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Alaskan Inuit food security conceptual framework : how to assess the Arctic from an Inuit perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295946
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Alaska. Technical report. 116 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Alaska. Technical report. 116 pp.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
12846313
Keywords
Alaska
Inuit
Traditional diet
Food security
Indigenous knowledge
Documents

InuitCircumpolarCouncilFoodSecurity-FullAssessmentReport.pdf

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Alaskan Inuit food security conceptual framework : how to assess the Arctic from an Inuit perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296240
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Alaska. Brochure. 2 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2015
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Alaska. Brochure. 2 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
6195361
Keywords
Alaska
Inuit
Traditional diet
Food security
Indigenous knowledge
Documents

alaskan_inuite_food_security_food_brochure.pdf

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Source
Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Winter 2002), pp. 30-40.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
  1 document  
Author
Spray, Zona
Source
Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Winter 2002), pp. 30-40.
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
407624
Keywords
Alaska
Traditional diet
Eskimo
Subsistence
Documents

alaska-s-vanishing-arctic-cuisine.pdf

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Aleut / Unangax Ethnobotany : an annotated bibliography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295944
Source
Aleut International Association, University of Alaska Anchorage, and Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, in cooperation with CAFF.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
Date
2006
  1 document  
Author
Veltre, D.W.
Pendleton, C.L.
Schively, S.A.
Hay, J.A.
Tararenkova, N.
Source
Aleut International Association, University of Alaska Anchorage, and Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, in cooperation with CAFF.
Date
2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Bibliography/Resource List
File Size
4179094
Keywords
Alaska
Traditional diet
Notes
CAFF Flora Technical Report No. 14, CAFF International Secretariat, Akureyri, Iceland.
ISBN No: 9979-9778-0-9
Documents

Aleut_Ethnobotany_Annotated_Bibliography_Oct_2006.pdf

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Assessment of "Traditional Foods" diets in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295346
Source
Makhteshim-Agan of North America, Inc. 4 pp.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2008
  1 document  
Author
Youngren, Susan Hunter
Source
Makhteshim-Agan of North America, Inc. 4 pp.
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
24735
Keywords
First Nations
Metis
Inuit
Traditional diet
Endosulfan
Alaska
Documents

08Hunter-Youngreen-2008-Traditional-Food-Diets-Assessment.pdf

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Biomonitoring in Greenland: Human biomarkers of exposure and effects - A short review

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96585
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1362
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Author
Bonefeld-Jorgensen, EC
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Denmark. ebj@mil.au.dk
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1362
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP)
Arctic ecosystem
Arctic populations
Bioaccumulation
Biomarkers
Biomonitoring
Exposure
Generation studies
Genetic polymorphisms
Greenland
Immune system
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Receptor effect studies
Traditional diet
Abstract
CONTEXT: Since 1997 the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) has produced integrated assessment reports on the status of and trends in environmental persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Arctic ecosystem. Three reports on biomonitoring POPs and their health risks for Arctic populations were published in 1998, 2002, and 2009. ISSUE: The present review summarizes data from Greenland on human monitoring of biomarkers of POP exposure and bioaccumulation and the determination of biomarkers for POP effects. The review focuses on hormone disruptive potentials and some genetic sensitivity biomarkers. The overview covers Greenlandic studies from 2000 to 2006. LESSONS LEARNED: The Greenland biomonitoring studies showed general geographical and gender differences of bioaccumulated serum POP levels, which were primarily related to diet and lifestyle. A high intake of traditional Greenlandic diet (eg seal, whale, polar bear, and seabirds) together with smoking caused higher blood concentrations of POPs. The highest POP values were found on the east coast of Greenland. The receptor effect studies showed a general inverse relationship between high serum POP concentration and estrogen receptor (ER) and Ah-receptor (AhR) transactivity; in addition for men in the two West Greenlandic districts, Nuuk and Sisimiut, a trend towards increased induced AR activity was found. An observed trend to an opposite direction between the dioxin-like AhR and ER activity supports the perception of that dioxins exert an antiestrogen effect. In conclusion, the actual mixtures of serum POPs in Greenlandic Inuit have an endocrine disrupting potential. Comparisons between European and Greenlandic male serum POP levels showed significantly higher levels in Inuit; however, in the same study Inuit had significantly lower sperm DNA damage. Further studies are required to elucidate whether the serum POP related effects on hormone receptors and/or AhR are explanatory factors. 'The Arctic dilemma' is that along with the intake of the Greenlandic traditional diet that contains POPs, there are also a number of important nutrients, such as trace elements/antioxidants and marine unsaturated fatty acids which have favorable effects on health. However, a number of studies suggest that an increase in Western food items in the diet can lead to other health risks, such as the metabolic syndrome and its sequels increase in weight, hypertension, diabetes type 2, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, including breast cancer. To elucidate these aspects further studies are required, including those into biomarkers for exposure and effects, epigenetic contexts and the determination of relevant genetic polymorphisms, case-control as well as generation studies. Finally, there is a need for the development of new biomarkers to study the potential POP effects that inhibit the immune system and affect the development of the central nervous system.
PubMed ID
20572746 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report II : 5 years of research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296442
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session X01.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2002
important to the traditional diets of northern Aboriginal peoples. Early studies indicated that there was a wide spectrum of substances – persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, and radionuclides – many of which had no Arctic or Canadian sources, but which were, nevertheless, reaching unexpectedly
  1 document  
Author
Shearer, Russel G.
Author Affiliation
Manager, Northern Contaminants Program, Northern Science and Contaminants Research Directorate, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Ottawa, Ontario
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session X01.
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
16059
Keywords
Fish
Wildlife
Traditional diets
Aboriginal peoples
Pollutants
Heavy metals
Radionuclides
Documents
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Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report II: Highlights

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297312
Source
Government of Canada, Minister of Indian and Northern Development. 118 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2003
of northern contaminants nationally and provides the research necessary to take action internationally. The NCP addresses concerns about exposure to elevated levels of contaminants in fish and wildlife species that are important to the traditional diets of northern Aboriginal peoples. In addition
  1 document  
Source
Government of Canada, Minister of Indian and Northern Development. 118 p.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
8264010
Keywords
Northern Canada
Contaminants
Humans
Wildlife
Health
Education
Climate change
Traditional diet
Abstract
CACAR II provides a comprehensive assessment of contaminants in Canada’s Arctic. This report not only reflects the work conducted by the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) over the last five years, but it is also a critical component of a long-term strategy to safeguard the northern environment and the general health of the North.
The NCP co-ordinates Canada’s action on the issue of northern contaminants nationally and provides the research necessary to take action internationally. The NCP addresses concerns about exposure to elevated levels of contaminants in fish and wildlife species that are important to the traditional diets of northern Aboriginal peoples.
The NCP has set new standards for Aboriginal and northern communities’ participation in scientific and government programs. The traditional knowledge of our northern Aboriginal partners is key in understanding how chemicals and pollutants, many of which had no Arctic or Canadian source, affect the lives of northerners.
Notes
ISBN 0-662-33466-3
Documents
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Climate change effects on traditional Inupiat food cellars.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297346
Source
Center for Climate and Health. CCH Bulletin no. 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
October 19, 2009
  1 document  
Author
Brubaker, Michael
Bell, Jacob
Rolin, Alicia
Source
Center for Climate and Health. CCH Bulletin no. 1.
Date
October 19, 2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
2524774
Keywords
Alaska
Point Hope
Thawing soil
Food cellars
Traditional diet
Abstract
This paper reports on a special health concern identified in Point Hope during the Climate Change Health Impacts Assessment performed in May 2009: the thawing of traditional food storage cellars due to warming soil temperature. This problem is reducing the quality and quantity of food available to the residents of Point Hope. Adaptive strategies are necessary to restore food security in Point Hope and in other Arctic communities that depend on traditional storage cellars.
Documents
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Climate change in the Arctic: current and future vulnerability in two Inuit communities in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295945
Source
The Geographical Journal , Vol. 174 , No. 1, March 2008, pp. 45–62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
  1 document  
Author
Ford, James D
Smit, Barry
Wandel, Johanna
Allurut, Mishak
Shappa, Kik
Ittusarjuat, Harry
Qrunnut, Kevin
Source
The Geographical Journal , Vol. 174 , No. 1, March 2008, pp. 45–62
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
343960
Keywords
Inuit
Climate change
Nunavut
Subsistence
Traditional diet
Vulnerability
Participatory research
Resource management
Abstract
Climate change is already occurring in the Arctic and the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment recently concluded that future climate change could be devastating for Inuit. This paper characterises vulnerability to climate change in two Inuit communities in the Canadian territory of Nunavut, focusing on the resource harvesting sector. In both communities, Inuit have demonstrated significant adaptability in the face of current changes in climatic conditions. This adaptability is facilitated by traditional Inuit knowledge, strong social networks, flexibility in resource use, and institutional support. Changing Inuit livelihoods, however, have undermined certain aspects of adaptive capacity and have resulted in emerging vulnerabilities. Global and regional climate projections indicate that climatic conditions which currently pose risks are expected to be negatively affected by future climate change. These projections are not without precedent and analysis of current vulnerability and identification of adaptation constraints by Inuit in the two communities indicate the continued importance of traditional coping mechanisms. The ability to draw on these coping mechanisms in light of future climate change, however, will be unequal and the research indicates that young Inuit and those without access to economic resources, in particular, are vulnerable.
Documents

Climate-change-in-the-Arctic---current-and-future-vulnerability-in-two-Inuit-communities-in-Canada.pdf

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31 records – page 1 of 4.