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1174 records – page 1 of 118.

5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference and Forum (2012) : "Resilience in a changing world". [Abstract book]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297025
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2012
NOTES 17 Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012 Local Alaska Native Traditional Knowledge in relation to marine mammals and our way of life or “Piciryaraq” (Yup’ik Eskimo) Helen M. Aderman, Marine Mammal Program
  1 document  
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
3624398
Keywords
Alaska
Fisheries
Marine science
Traditional knowledge
Subsistence
Sustainable energy
Waste disposal
Food security
Ecosystems
Education
Documents
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21st century rural nursing: Navajo Traditional and Western medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187143
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Barbara L O'Brien
Rosemary M Anslow
Wanda Begay
Sister Benvinda A Pereira
Mary Pat Sullivan
Author Affiliation
Magnetic Health Care Strategies, LLC, Middletown, New Jersey, USA.
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arizona
Case Management - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
New Mexico
Nurse practitioners
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
Past experiences enhance the future. Health care providers gaining expertise in creative thinking, traditional medicine, spirituality, and cultural sensitivity is an essential requirement for 21st century health care. We must stay mindful that poverty, isolation, and rural living may create new forms of social exclusion because of lack of communication and rapidly changing technology. Conversely, sensory overload resulting from a faster paced lifestyle and rapid enhancements in technology may cause increased tension and stress. This article reviews successes that may offer the reader ideas on coping with the provision of health care services in such a volatile changing environment, while honoring tradition and cultural competency.
PubMed ID
12515233 View in PubMed
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137 Cs concentrations in northern Alaskan Eskimos, 1962-79: effects of ecological, cultural and political factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1022
Source
Health Physics. 42(4):433-447.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
Hanson, WC
Author Affiliation
Battelle
Source
Health Physics. 42(4):433-447.
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Ambler
Anaktuvuk Pass
Barrow
Cesium-137
Diet, traditional
Food chain
Kotzebue
Point Hope
Radioactive fallout
Seasonal periodicity
Abstract
Concentrations of worldwide fallout 137Cs were measured in the lichen-caribou-Eskimo food chain of northern Alaska during the period 1962-79. Pronounced inputs of fallout occurred after major nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere and 137Cs was transmitted through the food chain to Eskimos with about a 2-yr delay due to environmental parameters. Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) meat sampled during spring harvest contained 4 times the 137Cs concentration of lichens obtained from their winter range. Calculated caribou meat ingestion rates of Anaktuvuk Pass Eskimos during winter ranged from approximately 1 kg/day in 1964 to 0.16 kg/day in 1977. Several environmental factors affected seasonal patterns and amounts of 137Cs transferred through the food chain. Maximum 137Cs concentrations of approximately 20 nCi/kg body weight in ESkimos occurred in 1964 and have now decreased to approximately 0.5 nCi/kg, largely because of cultural and political factors. Radiation doses from 137Cs body burdens during the study period ranged from 60 mrad/yr in 1962 to approximately 140 mrad/yr during the 1962-64 maxima and decreased to 8 mrad/yr in 1979.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 832.
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137Cs: seasonal patterns in native residents of three contrasting Alaskan villages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1023
Source
Health Physics. 21:585-591.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1971
Author
Hanson, W.C.
Author Affiliation
Battelle
Source
Health Physics. 21:585-591.
Date
1971
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Arctic Village
Ambler
Anaktuvuk Pass
Cesium-137
Diet, traditional
Food chain
Radioactive fallout
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage.
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Aboriginal Eskimo diet in modern perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature694
Source
American Anthropologist. 79:309-316.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
Draper, H.H.
Author Affiliation
University of Guelph
Source
American Anthropologist. 79:309-316.
Date
1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Point Hope
Wainwright
Nunapitchuk
Diet, traditional
Nutrition
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary protein
Acculturation
Lactose tolerance
Sucrose tolerance
Cholesterol
Blood pressure
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1122.
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Aboriginal Food Security in Northern Canada: An assessment of the state of knowledge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297086
Source
Expert Panel on the State of Knowledge of Food Security in Northern Canada, Council of Canadian Academies.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2014
task assigned to us. Rather, the trepidation resulted from knowing just how much evidence there is from scientific research and documentation, and also from a rich base of traditional knowledge and grey literature that informs the subject, but of which a comprehensive review has never been
  1 document  
Source
Expert Panel on the State of Knowledge of Food Security in Northern Canada, Council of Canadian Academies.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
4736035
Keywords
Canada, Northern
Naive Poeples
Nutrition
Food security
Traditional knowledge
Experience
Policies
Notes
ISBN 978-1-926558-73-8 (pbk.)
ISBN 978-1-926558-74-5 (pdf)
Documents

foodsecurity_fullreporten.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
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Aboriginal healing: regaining balance and culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171195
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Linda M Hunter
Jo Logan
Jean-Guy Goulet
Sylvia Barton
Author Affiliation
The Conference Board of Canada.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Spiritual Therapies
Urban Population
Abstract
This ethnographic study explored the question, How do urban-based First Nations peoples use healing traditions to address their health issues? The objectives were to examine how Aboriginal traditions addressed health issues and explore the link between such traditions and holism in nursing practice. Data collection consisted of individual interviews, participant observations, and field notes. Three major categories that emerged from the data analysis were: following a cultural path, gaining balance, and sharing in the circle of life. The global theme of healing holistically included following a cultural path by regaining culture through the use of healing traditions; gaining balance in the four realms of spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical health; and sharing in the circle of life by cultural interactions between Aboriginal peoples and non-Aboriginal health professionals. Implications for practice include incorporating the concepts of balance, holism, and cultural healing into the health care services for diverse Aboriginal peoples.
PubMed ID
16410432 View in PubMed
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Source
Pages 265-267 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
"civilisation". The resulting degradation of the physical environment has had far-reaching effects on the health of individuals and communities already suffering from several decades of suppression of traditional cultural practices. This paper discusses Canadian aboriginal approaches to health and the
  1 document  
Author
Wheatley, M.A
Author Affiliation
Ontario, Canada
Source
Pages 265-267 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Aboriginal health
Canada
Contamination
Degradation
Environment
First Nations
Health
Traditional practices
Abstract
The special relationship which Canadian aboriginal people have always had with the environment has been disrupted by the encroachment of "civilization." The resulting degradation of the physical environment has had far-reaching effects on the health of individuals and communities already suffering from several decades of suppression of traditional cultural practices. This paper discusses Canadian aboriginal approaches to health and the environment, examines some of the effects of environmental degradation on aboriginal health, and touches briefly on how traditional treatments and practices may help to improve the health of aboriginal individuals and communities.
Documents
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Aboriginal peoples, health and healing approaches: the effects of age and place on health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139688
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2011 Feb;72(3):355-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Kathi Wilson
Mark W Rosenberg
Sylvia Abonyi
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Mississauga, Department of Geography, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada. kathi.wilson@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2011 Feb;72(3):355-64
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Cohort Studies
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Female
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medicine, Traditional - methods
Middle Aged
Social Identification
Young Adult
Abstract
For demographic reasons and as a result of a number of high profile health incidents in recent years, much of the health research and policy focus is on the younger cohorts of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. A critical examination of recent demographic trends reveals, however, that older cohorts of the Aboriginal population are increasing at a faster rate than younger cohorts, primarily due to improvements in life expectancy and declining fertility rates. Yet, there are surprisingly few health studies that have recognized the aging of the Aboriginal population. The overall goal of this paper is to examine differences in health status, use of conventional health care and traditional approaches to healing between older and younger cohorts of the Aboriginal population as well as to examine the importance of age as a determinant of health and health care use. Using data from the 2001 Statistics Canada Aboriginal Peoples Survey and contingency tables and logistic regression, the results demonstrate that older Aboriginal people face unique challenges - e.g. loss of traditional approaches to healing, geographic isolation, identity politics, constitutional and legal divisions within the Aboriginal community - with respect to their health and access to health services. These outcomes result from a colonial past and contemporary policies that affect all Aboriginal people.
PubMed ID
21036444 View in PubMed
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Abortion in Thailand and Sweden: health services and short-term consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65618
Source
Ciba Found Symp. 1985;115:54-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
T N Singnomklao
Source
Ciba Found Symp. 1985;115:54-66
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Criminal
Abortion, Induced - methods - trends
Abortion, Legal
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Massage
Medicine, Traditional
Pregnancy
Risk
Rural Health - trends
Sweden
Thailand
Abstract
In Thailand, where abortion is still illegal, abortion services (health services) outside Bangkok, and outside hospitals or clinics, are provided by non-physician practitioners. In the studies reported here, those practitioners were interviewed in 1978 and 1981 about their methods and the characteristics of their clients. The first study revealed that massage is the method most widely used by rural practitioners and that uterine injection with different solutions comes second. The second study was in agreement with these findings. The health consequences of these induced abortions were studied by interviewing the clients of the rural practitioners in 1980 and 1981. In Sweden, where abortion has been legal for quite a long time, all women who need an abortion have access to safe and convenient health services throughout the country.
PubMed ID
3849419 View in PubMed
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1174 records – page 1 of 118.