Skip header and navigation

Refine By

50 records – page 1 of 5.

Alcohol intake correlated with serum trace elements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234064
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1988;23(4):279-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
P. Kärkkäinen
H. Mussalo-Rauhamaa
K. Poikolainen
J. Lehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1988;23(4):279-82
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Copper - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Magnesium - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Selenium - blood
Trace Elements - blood
Abstract
Alcohol intake and serum copper, selenium, magnesium, iron and zinc were investigated in 85 subjects, 48 males and 37 females. Alcohol intake was measured with a questionnaire probing alcohol intake during the preceding 30 days. Mean average daily intake among males was 119.7 g (range 0-622.3 g) and among females 32.1 g (range 0-378.5 g), and the mean consumption per drinking day among males was 208.5 g (range 0-666.7 g) and among females 63.8 g (range 0-63.8 g). Among males alcohol intake per drinking day correlated positively with serum copper (r = 0.50; P less than 0.001) and negatively with serum selenium (r = -0.49; P less than 0.001) and magnesium (r = 0.40; P less than 0.01). Likewise, among females alcohol intake per drinking day correlated positively with serum copper (r = 0.54; P less than 0.01) and negatively with serum magnesium (r = -0.36; P less than 0.05). Serum selenium concentration was negatively and significantly correlated with average daily intake (r = -0.34; P less than 0.05) but not with intake per drinking day. No significant correlations were found between alcohol intake and serum zinc or iron levels. Only two men, both abstainers, had abnormally low serum zinc level, and two other men (average daily alcohol intake less than 37 g) and two women (average daily alcohol intake less than 15 g) had abnormally high serum iron level. Alcohol intake was associated with high serum copper and low serum magnesium and selenium levels.
PubMed ID
3166627 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biomonitoring of 20 trace elements in blood and urine of occupationally exposed workers by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106550
Source
Talanta. 2013 Nov 15;116:764-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2013
Author
N B Ivanenko
A A Ivanenko
N D Solovyev
A E Zeimal'
D V Navolotskii
E J Drobyshev
Author Affiliation
Saint Petersburg State University, Universitetskiy pr. 26, 198504 Saint Petersburg, Russia; Institute of Toxicology, Federal Medico-Biological Agency, ul. Bekhtereva 1, 192019 Saint Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Talanta. 2013 Nov 15;116:764-9
Date
Nov-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aluminum - blood - urine
Beryllium - blood - urine
Chemical Industry
Chromium - blood - urine
Female
Humans
Limit of Detection
Male
Manganese - blood - urine
Mass Spectrometry - methods
Microwaves
Middle Aged
Nitric Acid - chemistry
Occupational Exposure
Risk assessment
Russia
Spectrophotometry, Atomic - methods
Trace Elements - blood - urine
Abstract
A sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for the determination of Ag, Al, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V and Zn in whole blood and urine was designed. Microwave-assisted digestion with concentrated nitric acid was used for blood samples. Urine samples were analyzed after 1/50 (v/v) dilution with 5% (v/v) nitric acid. For beryllium the necessity of medium resolution mode (R=4000) was shown. Method validation was performed using blood and urine reference materials and by analyzing of spiked samples. For the designed method relative standard deviation (RSD) for the concentration range 0.01-1.0 µg/L was 5-10%. RSD did not exceed 3% when trace elements concentrations were above 1.0 µg/L. Method detection limits (3s): Ag 0.7 ng/L, Al 16 ng/L, As 3.4 ng/L, Ba 0.02 ng/L, Be 1.5 ng/L, Cd 7.7 ng/L, Co 1.0 ng/L, Cr 2.8 ng/L, Cs 9.8 ng/L, Cu 27 ng/L, Fe 1.1 ng/L, Mn 1.8 ng/L, Ni 17 ng/L, Pb 13 ng/L, Se 0.07 ng/L, Sr 5.7 ng/L, Tl 0.2 ng/L, U 0.1 ng/L, V 0.7 ng/L and Zn 1.2 ng/L. A developed method was applied for trace element biomonitoring of occupationally exposed workers of a beryllium processing enterprise. For preliminary risk assessment technological surface dust had been analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Based upon results of 50 blood and 40 urine samples analyses occupational exposure evaluation was performed. Exposure risks were found not to exceed acceptable ranges. Possible health hazards were found for Be and also Al, Cr, Mn. Occupational health and safety recommendations for the biomonitored enterprise medical care unit were issued as a result of the current investigation.
PubMed ID
24148471 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Blood levels of trace elements in urban children with diffuse non-toxic goiter].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144386
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Jan-Feb;(1):27-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Savchenko
P A Tiupelev
S S Gololobova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Jan-Feb;(1):27-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Follow-Up Studies
Goiter, Endemic - blood - epidemiology
Humans
Prevalence
Prognosis
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Trace Elements - blood
Urban Population
Abstract
The blood concentrations of cadmium, cobalt, lead, manganese, copper, and zinc were studied in Vladivostok schoolchildren with diffuse non-toxic goiter followed up by an endocrinologist for 2-5years. It was established that the content of cadmium, cobalt, lead, and manganese significantly exceeded the relevant values in healthy adolescents and that of copper was lower. Zinc levels did not differ from those in healthy individuals.
PubMed ID
20373709 View in PubMed
Less detail

A blood survey of elements, viral antibodies, and hemoparasites in wintering Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) and Barrow's Goldeneyes (Bucephala islandica).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86030
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2008 Apr;44(2):486-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Heard Darryl J
Mulcahy Daniel M
Iverson Samuel A
Rizzolo Daniel J
Greiner Ellis C
Hall Jeff
Ip Hon
Esler Daniel
Author Affiliation
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610, USA. HeardD@mail.vetmed.ufl.edu
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2008 Apr;44(2):486-93
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Animals, Wild
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Ducks - blood
Erythrocytes - parasitology
Female
Influenza A virus - immunology
Male
Prevalence
Selenium - blood
Trace Elements - blood
Abstract
Twenty-eight Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) and 26 Barrow's Goldeneyes (Bucephala islandica) were captured in Prince William Sound, Alaska, between 1 and 15 March 2005. Blood was collected for quantification of element concentrations, prevalence of antibodies to several viruses, and hemoparasite prevalence and identification. Although we found selenium concentrations that have been associated with selenosis in some birds (>or=2.0 ppm ww), our findings contribute to a growing literature describing relatively high selenium in apparently healthy birds in marine environments. Avian influenza virus antibodies were detected in the plasma of 28% of the ducks. No antibodies against adenovirus, reovirus, or paramyxovirus 1 were detected. Several hemo-parasite species were identified in 7% of ducks. Our findings are similar to those in other free-living marine waterfowl and do not indicate unusual concerns for the health of these species in this area in late winter.
PubMed ID
18436685 View in PubMed
Less detail

Celiac disease in relation to immunologic serum markers, trace elements, and HLA-DR and DQ antigens in Swedish children with Down syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33184
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1999 Sep;29(3):286-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
T. Hansson
G. Annerén
O. Sjöberg
L. Klareskog
A. Dannaeus
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Immunology, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1999 Sep;29(3):286-92
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies - blood
Biopsy
Celiac Disease - complications - diagnosis - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Down Syndrome - complications
Female
Genotype
Gliadin - immunology
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Infant
Intestines - pathology
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Trace Elements - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: An association between Down syndrome and celiac disease has been reported. This study was conducted to determine the association between childhood celiac disease and Down syndrome in the county of Uppsala, Sweden. METHODS: All 76 children with Down syndrome (1-18 years) were screened for the occurrence of anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA) and anti-endomysium antibodies (EMA). Twelve children with suspected celiac disease were investigated further. RESULTS: Increased levels of both IgA and IgG AGA were found in 26% of the children and of EMA in and 5 of 76. Celiac disease was diagnosed in at least three of the children (3.9%; 95% confidence interval 0%-8.3%), and it could have been present in as many as eight. Three of the five EMA-positive children with suspected celiac disease had the HLA phenotype DR3, DQ2. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that determination of EMA is more useful as a screening test for celiac disease and for follow-up than is AGA in children with Down syndrome. The present study also confirms that celiac disease is overrepresented among Swedish children with Down syndrome and that celiac disease should be considered in all persons with Down syndrome.
PubMed ID
10467993 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in some blood micronutrients, leukocytes and neutrophil expression of adhesion molecules in periparturient dairy cows.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61740
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2001;42(1):139-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
G E Meglia
A. Johannisson
L. Petersson
K P Waller
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2001;42(1):139-50
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Nutrition
Animals
Antigens, CD18 - blood
Cattle - blood - physiology
Disease Susceptibility - veterinary
Female
L-Selectin - blood
Lactation
Leukocyte Count - veterinary
Leukocytes - metabolism
Minerals - blood
Neutrophils - metabolism
Pregnancy
Reference Values
Trace Elements - blood
Vitamins - blood
Abstract
Dairy cows are highly susceptible to infectious diseases, like mastitis, during the period around calving. Although factors contributing to increased susceptibility to infection have not been fully elucidated, impaired neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection and changes in the concentrations of some micronutrients related with the function of the immune defence has been implicated. Most of the current information is based on studies outside the Nordic countries where the conditions for dairy cows are different. Therefore, the aim of the study was to evaluate changes in blood concentrations of the vitamins A and E, the minerals calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P), and magnesium (Mg), the electrolytes potassium (K) and sodium (Na) and the trace elements selenium (Se), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn), as well as changes in total and differential white blood cell counts (WBC) and expression of the adhesion molecules CD62L and CD18 on blood neutrophils in Swedish dairy cows during the period around calving. Blood samples were taken from 10 cows one month before expected calving, at calving and one month after calving. The results were mainly in line with reports from other countries. The concentrations of vitamins A and E, and of Zn, Ca and P decreased significantly at calving, while Se, Cu, and Na increased. Leukocytosis was detected at calving, mainly explained by neutrophilia, but also by monocytosis. The numbers of lymphocytes tended to decrease at the same time. The mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) of CD62L and CD18 molecules on blood neutrophils remained constant over time. The proportion of CD62L+ neutrophils decreased significantly at calving. The animals were fed according to, or above, their requirements. Therefore, changes in blood levels of vitamins, minerals and trace elements were mainly in response to colostrum formation, changes in dry matter intake, and ruminal metabolism around calving. Decreased levels of vitamins A and E, and of Zn at calving might have negative implications for the functions of the immune defence. The lower proportion of CD62L+ neutrophils at calving may result in less migration of blood neutrophils into the tissues, and might contribute to the increased susceptibility to infections at this time.
PubMed ID
11455894 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Characteristics of the brain system activity and vegetative function formation in children under conditions of the European north (a problem study)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79179
Source
Ross Fiziol Zh Im I M Sechenova. 2006 Aug;92(8):905-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Soroko S I
Burykh E A
Bekshaev S S
Sidorenko G V
Sergeeva E G
Khovanskikh A E
Kormilitsyn B N
Moralev S N
Iagodina O V
Dobrodeeva L K
Maksimova I A
Protasova O V
Source
Ross Fiziol Zh Im I M Sechenova. 2006 Aug;92(8):905-29
Date
Aug-2006
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arctic Regions
Autonomic Nervous System - growth & development - physiology
Behavior - physiology
Brain - growth & development - physiology
Butyrylcholinesterase - metabolism
Child
Child Development
Climate
Cognition - physiology
Electroencephalography
Female
Humans
Male
Monoamine Oxidase - metabolism
Russia
Sexual Maturation
Trace Elements - blood
Abstract
Results of complex medical-physiological research performed during 10 scientific expeditions in Arkhangelsk region in 2003-2005 are presented. Influence of climatic-geographic, biogeochemical and social conditions of North-West region of Russia on sexual maturation, formation of the brain structural-functional organization, vegetative functions, immunological and biochemical status of schoolchildren was studied with the aid of modern neurophysiologic (computer electroencephalography, computer rheoencephalography, computed electric dipole origin tomography, etc.), psychophysiological and psychometric methods (evaluation of cognitive and mnestic functions, Vechsler 1Q estimation), biochemical assessment of monoamine oxidase and butyrylcholinesterase activity, physical-chemical analysis of macro- and microelements in the organism.
PubMed ID
17217243 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of individual-level vs. hypothetically pooled mercury biomonitoring data from the Maternal Organics Monitoring Study (MOMS), Alaska, 1999-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306987
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1726256
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2020
Author
Emily Mosites
Ernesto Rodriguez
Samuel P Caudill
Thomas W Hennessy
James Berner
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1726256
Date
12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Biological Monitoring - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Indians, North American
Mercury - blood
Pregnancy
Trace Elements - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Biomonitoring for heavy metals is important to assess health risks, especially in Arctic communities where rural residents rely on locally harvested foods. However, laboratory testing for blood contaminants is expensive and might not be sustainable for long-term monitoring. We assessed whether pooled specimen biomonitoring could be a part of a plan for blood contaminant surveillance among pregnant women in rural Alaska using existing blood mercury level data from three cross sectional studies of pregnant women. We applied a hypothetical pooled specimen template stratified into 8 demographic groups based on age, coastal or inland residence, and pre-pregnancy weight. The hypothetical geometric mean blood mercury levels were similar to the individual-level geometric means. However, the 95% confidence intervals were much wider for the hypothetical geometric means compared to the true geometric means. Although the variability that resulted from pooling specimens using a small sample made it difficult to compare demographic groups to each other, pooled specimen results could be an accurate reflection of the population burden of mercury contamination in the Arctic in the context of large numbers of biomonitoring samples.
PubMed ID
32039659 View in PubMed
Less detail

Concentrations of essential trace elements in maternal serum and the effect on birth weight and newborn body mass index in sub-arctic and arctic populations of Norway and Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4529
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 Aug;78(7):605-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
J O Odland
E. Nieboer
N. Romanova
Y. Thomassen
J. Brox
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 Aug;78(7):605-14
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Birth weight
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn - physiology
Norway
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy outcome
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Russia
Trace Elements - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This project is part of an assessment of the impact of environmental factors on human health in the Kola Peninsula of Russia and the neighboring arctic area of Norway. Pregnant women and their newborns were studied to explore a relationship between maternal status of essential metals and birth weight. METHODS: Life-style information and serum specimens were collected from at least 50 consecutive mother-infant pairs from hospital delivery departments in three Russian and three Norwegian communities (N=151 and 167, respectively). Pregnancy outcomes were verified by consulting medical records. Copper, selenium and zinc in serum were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry and ferritin by an automated analyzer method. RESULTS: Mean birth weight and child's body mass index (BMIC) were significantly lower in the Russian group (p
PubMed ID
10422907 View in PubMed
Less detail

50 records – page 1 of 5.