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Adult norms of the perceptual threshold of touch (PTT) in the hands and feet in relation to age, gender, and right and left side using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128549
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2012 Jul;28(5):373-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Elsy Eek
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Disa K Sommerfeld
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Danderyd, Sweden. elsy.eek@sll.se
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2012 Jul;28(5):373-83
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Female
Foot - innervation
Functional Laterality
Hand - innervation
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination - standards
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Sensory Thresholds
Sex Factors
Sweden
Touch
Touch Perception
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a lack of standardized and quantifiable measures of touch function, for clinical work. Furthermore, it is not possible to make accurate diagnostic judgments of touch function before normative values are estimated. The objectives of this study were to establish adult norms of the perceptual threshold of touch (PTT) for the hands and feet according to age and gender and to determine the effect of right/left side, handedness, height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) on the PTT. The PTT was assessed by using a high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator (Hf/TENS) with self-adhesive skin electrodes in 346 adults. The PTT was identified as the level registered in mA at which the participants perceived a tingling sensation. The PTT for all participants was a median of 3.75 mA (range 2.50-7.25) in the hands and a median of 10.00 (range 5.00-30.00) in the feet. With increasing age an increase of the PTT was found. Men reported higher PTT than women. The right hand had higher PTT than the left. Handedness, height, weight, and BMI did not affect the PTT. Adult norms of the PTT in the hands for age, gender, and right/left side are presented for four age groups. The present study's estimate of the PTT in the hands could be used as adult norms. Adult norms for the feet could not be estimated because the PTT values in the feet showed a great variance.
PubMed ID
22191416 View in PubMed
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[Affective touch and self esteem in the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167192
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Andréa Boudreault
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Infirmière clinicienne au Carrefour de santé de Jonquière, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Date
Sep-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing - organization & administration
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Negativism
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Prejudice
Quebec
Self Concept
Shame
Touch
Abstract
The hospital is an environment which accomodates the elderly persons and in which these last have to make trainings at one time when they are not in full possession with all their physical, psychological and cognitive capacities. They can then live there humiliating situations which generate feelings of discomfort, embarrassment and shame. The presence of interveners not very warm, lacking compassion lack and impressed negative prejudices towards the elderly patients, is another factor which is added to lead them not to feel at ease, involving, inter alia, consequences a fall of their self-esteem. However the affective touch is a strategy which would have the potential to act on the personal value of the elderly patients and to thus improve their self-esteem. It is with a view to popularize the use of the affective touch in practice nurse that a study was carried out in order to check its effects on the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The results confirm that the emotional touch influences positively the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The authors of the study thus recommend the systematization of the affective touch in nursing practice.
PubMed ID
17020239 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study on the prevalence of hallucinations in a general-population sample: Effects of age and sensory modality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300137
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2019 02; 272:707-714
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2019
Author
Frank Larøi
Josef J Bless
Julien Laloyaux
Bodil Kråkvik
Einar Vedul-Kjelsås
Anne Martha Kalhovde
Marco Hirnstein
Kenneth Hugdahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway; NORMENT - Norwegian Center of Excellence for Mental Disorders Research, University of Oslo, Norway; Psychology and Neuroscience of Cognition Research Unit, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium. Electronic address: Frank.Laroi@uib.no.
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2019 02; 272:707-714
Date
02-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hallucinations - epidemiology
Hearing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Smell
Touch
Vision, Ocular
Young Adult
Abstract
Epidemiological studies have repeatedly shown that a significant minority of the general population have experienced hallucinations, however, a potential effect of age on the prevalence of hallucinations in the general population has never been previously examined in a specific study. The aim of the present study was thus to examine the effects of age and sensory modality on hallucination prevalence in a general population sample. A large, randomly selected and representative sample of the Norwegian population completed measures assessing different hallucination modalities (auditory, visual, olfactory, and tactile) and types (sensed presence and hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations). Three age groups were identified and compared: young (19-30 years), middle (31-60) and old (61-96). There was a significant main-effect of age for all hallucination modalities and types, whereby hallucination prevalence significantly decreased with age. We also found that anxiety partially mediated the effect of age on hallucinations whilst depression was a partial suppressor. Concerning the co-occurrence of hallucination modalities, there was very little co-occurrence of auditory and visual hallucinations in all three age groups. In summary, a main-effect of age for hallucination prevalence was observed. Furthermore, individuals reported a more diverse variety of hallucination modalities compared to what is commonly reported in clinical populations.
PubMed ID
30832190 View in PubMed
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Application of metrics constructed from vibrotactile thresholds to the assessment of tactile sensory changes in the hands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158996
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Dec;122(6):3732-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
A J Brammer
P. Sutinen
U A Diva
I. Pyykkö
E. Toppila
J. Starck
Author Affiliation
Ergonomic Technology Center, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-2017 and Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canada. tony.brammer@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Dec;122(6):3732-42
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Equipment Design
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Forestry - instrumentation
Hand - innervation
Humans
Hypesthesia - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Mechanotransduction, Cellular
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Prospective Studies
Sensory Thresholds
Time Factors
Touch
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
Two tools for assessing tactile sensory disturbances in the hands have been constructed from mechanoreceptor-specific vibrotactile threshold shifts, and thresholds changes with time, and employed in a prospective study of forest workers (N=18). Statistically significant positive threshold shifts (i.e., reductions in sensitivity compared to the hands of healthy persons) were found in five hands at study inception (13.9%), and 15 hands at follow-up (41.7%). Four patterns of threshold shift could be identified, involving selectively the median and/or ulnar nerve pathways and/or end organs. Statistically significant positive threshold changes (i.e., reductions in sensitivity with time) were recorded in 69.4% of the hands over a five-year period, even though a majority of the workers remained symptom free. If the thresholds recorded from subjects not working with power tools are used to control for aging, lifestyle, and environmental factors during the five year period, then 40% of the remaining subjects are found to be experiencing work-related threshold changes in their hands. The ability of the threshold shift metric to predict the numbness reported by these subjects shows that it is closely associated with the tactile sensory changes occurring in their hands.
PubMed ID
18247781 View in PubMed
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Assessment of dose selection attributes with audible notification in insulin pen devices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46992
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2005 Aug;7(4):620-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Toshinari Asakura
Hiroaki Seino
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacy, Ohta Nishinouchi Hospital, 2-5-20 Nishinouchi, Koriyama, Fukushima-ken 963-8558, Japan. asa-mac@m7.dion.ne.jp
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2005 Aug;7(4):620-6
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automation
Blindness - prevention & control
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Diabetic Retinopathy - prevention & control
Equipment Design
Female
Humans
Injections, Subcutaneous - instrumentation
Insulin - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Touch
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients with type 2 diabetes often suffer from impairments in vision as well as manual dexterity. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of dose selection and setting of five insulin devices by patients using auditory and sensory confirmation. METHODS: A total of 48 patients (30 men, 18 women; mean +/- SD age 60.5 +/- 14.0 years; hemoglobin A(1c) 8.7 +/- 1.9%) were randomized to test the following devices: NovoPen 3 (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark), HumaPen Ergo (Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN), Humalog Pen (Eli Lilly), InnoLet (Novo Nordisk), and FlexPen(Novo Nordisk). RESULTS: Significantly more patients detected an auditory confirmation of dose setting when using the NovoPen 3 compared with the Humalog Pen (P
Notes
Comment In: Diabetes Technol Ther. 2005 Aug;7(4):627-816120037
PubMed ID
16120036 View in PubMed
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Best practice guidelines: an invitation to reflect on Therapeutic Touch practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176362
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2005 Jan-Mar;20(1):90-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Theresa Moore
Author Affiliation
theresamoore99@rogers.com
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2005 Jan-Mar;20(1):90-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Benchmarking - organization & administration
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Humans
Leadership
Models, Nursing
Nurse-Patient Relations
Ontario
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Philosophy, Nursing
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Societies, Nursing
Therapeutic Touch - nursing - standards
Abstract
Best practice guidelines can support nurses in providing consistent, evidence-based quality care. This article describes the values and beliefs underlying a best practice guideline for client-centered care and the process used by the author to translate this guideline into reflective questions specific to Therapeutic Touch practice. Applying best practice guidelines in this way, to enhance reflection on a particular aspect of practice, can "bring them to life," facilitating implementation and allowing new possibilities to emerge for improving client care.
PubMed ID
15686081 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
I. Rytömaa
V. Järvinen
R. Kanerva
O P Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, Institute of Dentistry, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):36-40
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bulimia - complications
Case-Control Studies
Cold Temperature - diagnostic use
Dental caries - etiology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Dentin Sensitivity - etiology - prevention & control
Eating Disorders - complications
Educational Status
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Gastroesophageal Reflux - etiology
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Interviews as Topic
Periodontal Index
Risk factors
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate - physiology
Tooth Abrasion - etiology
Tooth Attrition - etiology
Tooth Erosion - etiology - prevention & control
Touch
Xerostomia - physiopathology
Abstract
Eating disorders are often associated with regurgitation of gastric contents into the mouth and dental erosion. In this study the dental status was evaluated in bulimic patients. Thirty-five bulimics, diagnosed in the Outpatient Departments of Psychiatry and Adolescent Psychiatry of the University Central Hospital in Helsinki, and 105 controls matched for age, sex, and educational level were examined clinically, and the factors associated with dental erosion and caries were evaluated in an interview. Severe dental erosion and dental caries were significantly commoner among bulimics than controls. Bulimics commonly had a low salivary flow rate, but other apparent risk factors of dental erosion did not differ from those of controls. A feeling of dry mouth was commoner among bulimics than controls, and bulimics had an increased tooth sensitivity to cold and touch. More should be done to protect teeth from dental erosion among bulimics, because loss of tooth tissue remains even if the eating disorder disappears.
PubMed ID
9537733 View in PubMed
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Caring touch--patients' experiences in an anthroposophic clinical context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280475
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Dec;29(4):834-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Lise-Lotte Ozolins
Ulrica Hörberg
Karin Dahlberg
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Dec;29(4):834-42
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthroposophy
Attitude of Health Personnel
Caregivers - psychology
Empathy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patients - psychology
Sweden
Therapeutic Touch - psychology
Abstract
This study describes the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspective in an anthroposophic clinical context where caring touch is often used to promote health and alleviate suffering. The aim of the study was to explore and phenomenologically describe the phenomenon of caring touch from the patients' perspectives. The study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach in order to understand and describe human existential phenomena. Ten female patients were interviewed in an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden. The findings show how caring touch has multifaceted meanings and makes the patients' feel present and anchored in a meaningful context. The patients' feel that they are seen, accepted and confirmed. Furthermore, touch creates a caring space where the patients become receptive for care and has the power to alleviate the patients' suffering, as well as to frighten and cause or worsen the suffering. In order to take advantage of the caring potential, the patient needs to be invited to a respectful and sensitive form of touch. An interpersonal flexible space is necessary where the touch can be effective, and where a dynamic interplay can develop. In conclusion, caring touch is an opportunity for carers to support well-being and health. The carers need to approach their patients in both a sensitive and reflective way. A caring science perspective can serve as a help to further understand touch as a unique caring act.
PubMed ID
26178972 View in PubMed
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74 records – page 1 of 8.