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140 records – page 1 of 14.

Adolescents' perception of the quality of orthodontic treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29729
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):95-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Bodil Wilde Larsson
Kurt Bergström
Author Affiliation
Division for Health and Care, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. bodil.wilde@kau.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):95-101
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Attitude to Health
Bias (epidemiology)
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Orthodontics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Compliance - psychology
Patient Participation - psychology
Quality of Health Care - standards
Questionnaires
Sweden
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Urban health
Abstract
The aim was to describe quality of care from a patient perspective among adolescents receiving orthodontic treatment and to assess the relationship between quality of care and outcome-related aspects. The research design was cross-sectional. The sample consisted of 151 young people (mean age 17.1 years, SD: 2.2; 53% girls and 47% boys) receiving orthodontic treatment in the Stockholm region in Sweden (response rate 75%). Data were collected using the Quality from the Patient's Perspective questionnaire. The highest quality of care perceptions were noted on items dealing with receiving the best possible orthodontic treatment and being treated with respect. Less favourable perceptions of the quality of care were found regarding the opportunity to participate in the decisions related to the orthodontic treatment. In order to improve the quality of care a more active involvement of these patients in the decision-making process is suggested. The item 'I received the best possible orthodontic treatment' noted the highest subjective importance rating. The youngest participants reported the most favourable scores and the oldest the least. The majority (74%) reported that they were 'completely satisfied' with the result of the orthodontic treatment. However, 52% claimed that they had not followed all of the advice obtained during the treatment period, and 29% indicated some or more hesitation about attending the same dentist for future treatment.
PubMed ID
15877634 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative: improving the cardiac patient journey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146165
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:85-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Robyn Blackadar
Mishaela Houle
Author Affiliation
Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:85-90
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Benchmarking - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Coronary Artery Bypass
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Plan Implementation
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Heart Diseases - therapy
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Case Studies
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative (ACAC) is a joint initiative of Alberta's health system to improve access to adult cardiac services across the patient journey. ACAC has created new care delivery models and implemented best practices across Alberta in four streams across the continuum: heart attack, patient navigation, heart failure and arrhythmia. Emergency medical providers, nurses, primary care physicians, hospitals, cardiac specialists and clinicians are all working together to integrate services, bridge jurisdictions and geography with one aim--improving the patient journey for adults in need of cardiac care.
PubMed ID
20057256 View in PubMed
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Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146163
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sandra Delon
Blair Mackinnon
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease Prevention & Oral Health, Alberta Health Services.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Decision Support Techniques
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Humans
Long-Term Care
Models, organizational
National Health Programs
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Self Care
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.
PubMed ID
20057258 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the quality improvement of prehospital emergency care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199971
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 1998 Dec;5(4):407-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
B O Suserud
K A Wallman-C:son
H. Haljamäe
Author Affiliation
University of Borås, School of Health Sciences, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 1998 Dec;5(4):407-14
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence - standards
Emergency Medical Services - standards
Emergency Medical Technicians - education - supply & distribution
Health Services Research
Humans
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - statistics & numerical data
Physician Executives
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Sweden
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
The optimal competence level of personnel involved in prehospital emergency care is a matter for discussion. In Sweden a national quality improvement process has been initiated including strict regulation of the authorization of ambulance personnel to administer drugs and increased involvement of registered nurses. The aim of the present study was to assess from a national survey the present status of the ongoing quality improvement process in prehospital emergency care in Sweden. A questionnaire, detailing organizational, staffing, competence and functional aspects, was sent to all medical directors of prehospital EMS. The response frequency was 87.5%. Variations in the local organization of the prehospital care were observed. Only a limited number (20%) of the districts organized the ambulance services according to the competence level of the personnel. It was found that the competence level of the personnel involved in prehospital emergency care had improved considerably compared with the situation 5 years ago. A majority of the ambulancemen had increased their competence level by completing nurse assistant training and more registered nurses had been employed. The changes in the competence level and organization of the ambulance services and prehospital emergency care were considered to have had moderate (38.5%) or great (51.9%) impact on the quality of the services during the past 5 years. The effect was reported by 53.2% of the directors to be objectively verified from review of ambulance records, regular proficiency tests, patient survival data (cardiopulmonary resuscitation), and analyses of computer-based records. It is concluded that the present study clearly shows that quality improvement process initiated by the Swedish authorities has resulted in a considerable improvement of prehospital emergency care in Sweden during the past few years.
PubMed ID
10607408 View in PubMed
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The behavioural outcomes of quality improvement teams: the role of team success and team identification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195949
Source
Health Serv Manage Res. 2000 May;13(2):78-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
D M Irvine
P. Leatt
M G Evans
G R Baker
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. d.irvine@UTORONTO.CA
Source
Health Serv Manage Res. 2000 May;13(2):78-89
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Community - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Management Quality Circles
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Personnel Loyalty
Power (Psychology)
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
This study investigates the relationship between hospital quality improvement (QI) team success and changes in empowerment, 'organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behaviour' (OCB) and job behaviour related to QI. Data were collected from administrative staff, healthcare professionals and support staff from four community hospitals. The study involved a field investigation with two data collection points. Structured questionnaires and interviews with hospital management were used to collect data on the study variables. High scores were observed for organizational commitment, OCB and job behaviour related to QI when individuals identified with teams that were successful. Low scores were observed when individuals identified with teams that were unsuccessful. Empowerment was positively related to job behaviour associated with QI. It is concluded that participation on QI teams can lead to organizational learning, resulting in the inculcation of positive 'extra-role' and 'in-role' job behaviour.
PubMed ID
11184012 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Nurse. 2005 Oct;101(8):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Susan Bisaillon
Linda Kelloway
Kathryn LeBlanc
Nicole Pageau
Nadia Woloshyn
Author Affiliation
Neuroscience/Musculoskeletal Health System, Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga, Ontario.
Source
Can Nurse. 2005 Oct;101(8):25-9
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Deglutition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Emergency Treatment - nursing - standards
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Hospitals, Community - organization & administration
Humans
Mass Screening - standards
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Risk Assessment - standards
Stroke - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Time Factors
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - therapeutic use
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Triage - standards
Abstract
In 2001, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care introduced the Ontario Stroke Strategy by designating regional stroke centres across the province. The primary role of these centres is to coordinate stroke care within the region and across the care continuum in keeping with best practices. Concurrently, Trillium Health Centre was identifying best practice projects to support its ongoing quest for excellence. With Trillium designated as a regional stroke centre, acute ischemic stroke care was an obvious choice for a best practice project. The aim of the project was to improve access to care and quality of care for stroke patients from emergency through acute care to in-patient rehabilitation. The team chose the rapid cycle change methodology. This approach to quality improvement advocates the testing of a series of small changes (i.e., process improvement ideas) in tandem with measurements to assess the impact of the change to drive further process improvements. The project was deemed a success, resulting in significant improvements in the timeliness and quality of care.
PubMed ID
16295364 View in PubMed
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Building capacity to provide palliative care in rural and remote communities: does education make a difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176323
Source
J Palliat Care. 2004;20(4):308-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Mary Lou Kelley
Sonja Habjan
Joanna Aegard
Author Affiliation
Northern Educational Centre for Aging and Health, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2004;20(4):308-15
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Curriculum
Education, Continuing - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - education - psychology
Humans
Medically underserved area
Models, Educational
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Rural health services - organization & administration
Self Efficacy
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
One strategy for improving access to palliative care services in rural and remote communities is to educate community-based health professionals in the knowledge and skills required to provide end-of-life care. It is, therefore, important to evaluate palliative care educational initiatives. This article provides an evaluation of the interdisciplinary education program at Lakehead University which aims to: improve the knowledge and skills of individual providers; contribute to the development of palliative care programs in rural communities; and develop palliative care trainers to educate their co-workers in the workplace. A survey of 353 providers who participated in the education program was completed after eight years of providing education. Results confirm that the goals of the education program were met, and that rural and remote communities reported a greater capacity to deliver palliative care. Nevertheless, respondents identified a lack of resources, especially home care visits, as an obstacle to improving care.
PubMed ID
15690834 View in PubMed
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140 records – page 1 of 14.