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372 records – page 1 of 38.

Achieving clinical improvement: an interdisciplinary intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187771
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2002;27(4):42-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Diane M Irvine Doran
G Ross Baker
Michael Murray
John Bohnen
Catherine Zahn
Souraya Sidani
Jennifer Carryer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2002;27(4):42-56
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Group Processes
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Urban - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Team - standards
Problem Solving
Staff Development
Total Quality Management
Abstract
This study evaluates whether training health care teams in continuous quality improvement methods results in improvements in the care of and outcomes for patients. Nine of the 25 teams who participated in the study were successful in improving the care/outcomes for patients. Successful teams were more effective at problem solving, engaged in more functional group interactions, and were more likely to have physician participation.
PubMed ID
12433246 View in PubMed
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Adapting national and international leg ulcer practice guidelines for local use: the Ontario Leg Ulcer Community Care Protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173361
Source
Adv Skin Wound Care. 2005 Jul-Aug;18(6):307-18
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ian D Graham
Margaret B Harrison
Karen Lorimer
Tadeusz Piercianowski
Elaine Friedberg
Maureen Buchanan
Connie Harris
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, and Ottawa Health Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Adv Skin Wound Care. 2005 Jul-Aug;18(6):307-18
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
International Cooperation
Leg Ulcer - diagnosis - therapy
National Health Programs - standards
Ontario
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Severity of Illness Index
Total Quality Management
Abstract
Because of growing resources devoted to individuals requiring community care for leg ulcers, the authority responsible for home care in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, established and evaluated a demonstration leg ulcer service. In an effort to provide current and evidence-based care, existing leg ulcer clinical practice guidelines were identified and appraised for quality and suitability to the new service.
The Practice Guideline Evaluation and Adaptation Cycle guided development of a local protocol for leg ulcer care, which included: (1) systematically searching for practice guidelines, (2) appraising the quality of identified guidelines using a validated guideline appraisal instrument, (3) conducting a content analysis of guideline recommendations, (4) selecting recommendations to include in the local protocol, and (5) obtaining practitioner and external expert feedback on the proposed protocol. Updating the protocol followed a similar process.
Of 19 identified leg ulcer practice guidelines, 14 were not evaluated because they did not meet the criteria (ie, treatment-focused guidelines, written in English and developed after 1998). Of the 5 remaining guidelines, 3 were fairly well developed and made similar recommendations. The level of evidence supporting specific recommendations ranged from randomized clinical trial evidence to expert opinion. By comparing the methodologic quality and content of the guidelines, the Task Force reached consensus regarding recommendations appropriate for local application. Two additional guidelines were subsequently identified and incorporated into the local protocol during a scheduled update.
Local adaptation of international and national guidelines is feasible following facilitation of the Practice Guidelines Evaluation and Adaptation Cycle.
PubMed ID
16096396 View in PubMed
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Adherence to guidelines when positioning the defibrillation electrodes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180186
Source
Resuscitation. 2004 May;61(2):143-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Jouni Nurmi
Per Rosenberg
Maaret Castrén
Author Affiliation
Uusimaa EMS, Helsinki University Hospital, Eteläinen Hesperiankatu, 22A 26, Helsinki 00100, Finland. jouni.nurmi@helsinki.fi
Source
Resuscitation. 2004 May;61(2):143-7
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - instrumentation - standards
Clinical Competence
Confidence Intervals
Electric Countershock - instrumentation - standards
Electrodes
Emergency medical services
Female
Finland
Guideline Adherence
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Probability
Total Quality Management
Abstract
Placement of the defibrillation electrodes affects the transmyocardial current and thus the success of a defibrillation attempt. In the international guidelines 2000, the placement of the apical electrode was changed more laterally to the mid-axillary line. Finnish national guidelines, based on the international guidelines, were published in 2002.
The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent health care professionals adhere to the new guidelines when positioning the electrodes.
Professionals were recruited from emergency medical services, university hospitals and primary care. Not revealing the purpose of the test, participants were asked to place self-adhesive electrodes on a manikin as they would do in the resuscitation situation and to answer a questionnaire about resuscitation training and familiarity with the guidelines. The distance of electrodes from the recommended position was measured in horizontal and vertical planes.
One-hundred and thirty six professionals participated in the study, and only 25.4% (95% CI 18.5-32.9) of them placed both electrodes within 5 cm from the recommended position. The majority of the participants placed the apical electrode too anteriorly. Of the participants, 36.0% were not aware of the new guidelines. Awareness of the guidelines did not increase the accuracy in electrode placement.
The publication of the national evidence based resuscitation guidelines did not seem to have influenced the practice of placement of the defibrillation electrodes to any major extent. The correct placement of the electrodes needs be emphasized more in the resuscitation training.
PubMed ID
15135190 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' perception of the quality of orthodontic treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29729
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):95-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Bodil Wilde Larsson
Kurt Bergström
Author Affiliation
Division for Health and Care, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. bodil.wilde@kau.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):95-101
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Attitude to Health
Bias (epidemiology)
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Orthodontics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Compliance - psychology
Patient Participation - psychology
Quality of Health Care - standards
Questionnaires
Sweden
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Urban health
Abstract
The aim was to describe quality of care from a patient perspective among adolescents receiving orthodontic treatment and to assess the relationship between quality of care and outcome-related aspects. The research design was cross-sectional. The sample consisted of 151 young people (mean age 17.1 years, SD: 2.2; 53% girls and 47% boys) receiving orthodontic treatment in the Stockholm region in Sweden (response rate 75%). Data were collected using the Quality from the Patient's Perspective questionnaire. The highest quality of care perceptions were noted on items dealing with receiving the best possible orthodontic treatment and being treated with respect. Less favourable perceptions of the quality of care were found regarding the opportunity to participate in the decisions related to the orthodontic treatment. In order to improve the quality of care a more active involvement of these patients in the decision-making process is suggested. The item 'I received the best possible orthodontic treatment' noted the highest subjective importance rating. The youngest participants reported the most favourable scores and the oldest the least. The majority (74%) reported that they were 'completely satisfied' with the result of the orthodontic treatment. However, 52% claimed that they had not followed all of the advice obtained during the treatment period, and 29% indicated some or more hesitation about attending the same dentist for future treatment.
PubMed ID
15877634 View in PubMed
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AIDER: a model for social accountability in medical education and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115994
Source
Med Teach. 2013 Aug;35(8):e1403-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Gurjit Sandhu
Ivneet Garcha
Jessica Sleeth
Karen Yeates
G Ross Walker
Author Affiliation
Postgraduate Medical Education, Faculty of Health Sciences, 70 Barrie Street, Queen’s University, Kingston,ON K7L 3N6, Canada. sandhug@queensu.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2013 Aug;35(8):e1403-8
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada
Disabled Persons
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Physicians
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Sex
Sexism
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
Total Quality Management
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Social accountability in healthcare requires physicians and medical institutions to direct their research, services and education activities to adequately address health inequities. The need for greater social accountability has been addressed in numerous national and international healthcare reviews of health disparities and medical education.
The aim of this work is to better understand how to identify underserved populations and address their specific needs and also to provide physicians and medical institutions with a means by which to cultivate social accountability.
The authors reviewed existing literature and prominent models focusing on social accountability, as well as medical education frameworks, and identified the need to engage underserved stakeholders and incorporate education that includes knowledge translation and reciprocity. The AIDER model was developed to satisfy the need in medical education and practice that is not explicitly addressed in previous models.
The AIDER model (Assess, Inquire, Deliver, Educate, Respond) is a continuous monitoring process that explicitly incorporates reciprocal education and continuous collaboration with underserved stakeholders.
This model is an incremental step forward in helping physicians and medical institutions foster a culture of social accountability both in individual practice and throughout the continuum of medical education.
PubMed ID
23444886 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative: improving the cardiac patient journey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146165
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:85-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Robyn Blackadar
Mishaela Houle
Author Affiliation
Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:85-90
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Benchmarking - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Coronary Artery Bypass
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Plan Implementation
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Heart Diseases - therapy
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Case Studies
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative (ACAC) is a joint initiative of Alberta's health system to improve access to adult cardiac services across the patient journey. ACAC has created new care delivery models and implemented best practices across Alberta in four streams across the continuum: heart attack, patient navigation, heart failure and arrhythmia. Emergency medical providers, nurses, primary care physicians, hospitals, cardiac specialists and clinicians are all working together to integrate services, bridge jurisdictions and geography with one aim--improving the patient journey for adults in need of cardiac care.
PubMed ID
20057256 View in PubMed
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Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146163
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sandra Delon
Blair Mackinnon
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease Prevention & Oral Health, Alberta Health Services.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Decision Support Techniques
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Humans
Long-Term Care
Models, organizational
National Health Programs
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Self Care
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.
PubMed ID
20057258 View in PubMed
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The application of continuous quality improvement (CQI) principles to emergency medicine procedures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207435
Source
J Emerg Med. 1997 Sep-Oct;15(5):725-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Kollek
Source
J Emerg Med. 1997 Sep-Oct;15(5):725-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Humans
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration
Thrombolytic Therapy
Total Quality Management
Notes
Comment On: J Emerg Med. 1996 Nov-Dec;14(6):685-98969986
PubMed ID
9348067 View in PubMed
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372 records – page 1 of 38.