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Agricultural contamination of groundwater as a possible risk factor for growth restriction or prematurity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194907
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2001 Apr;43(4):377-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
J. Bukowski
G. Somers
J. Bryanton
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre, University of Prince Edward Island.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2001 Apr;43(4):377-83
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Case-Control Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nitrates - adverse effects - analysis
Obstetric Labor, Premature - chemically induced - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prince Edward Island - epidemiology
Risk factors
Topography, Medical
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - analysis
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
Agricultural activity on Prince Edward Island poses a potential hazard to groundwater, which is the sole source of drinking water on the island. This study investigates the potential impact of groundwater nitrate exposure on prematurity and intrauterine growth restriction on Prince Edward Island. A total of 210 intrauterine growth restriction cases, 336 premature births, and 4098 controls were abstracted from a database of all Island births. An ecological measure of groundwater nitrate level was used to gauge potential exposure to agriculturally contaminated drinking water. The higher nitrate exposure categories were positively associated with intrauterine growth restriction and prematurity, and significant dose-response trends were seen, even after adjustment for several important covariates. Nevertheless, these risks must be interpreted cautiously because of the ecological nature of this exposure metric. An investigation using nitrate levels for individual study subjects is needed to confirm this association.
PubMed ID
11322099 View in PubMed
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All-time high tularaemia incidence in Norway in 2011: report from the national surveillance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263869
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;33(11):1919-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
K W Larssen
K. Bergh
B T Heier
L. Vold
J E Afset
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;33(11):1919-26
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Francisella tularensis - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Seasons
Topography, Medical
Tularemia - epidemiology - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Tularaemia has mainly been a sporadic disease in Norway. In 2011, 180 persons (3.7 per 100,000 population) were diagnosed with tularaemia. This article describes the epidemiological and clinical features of tularaemia cases during a year with exceptionally high tularaemia incidence. Data from the national reference laboratory for tularaemia combined with epidemiological data from the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (MSIS) were used. The incidence of tularaemia varied greatly between counties, but almost every county was involved. The majority (77.8 %) of the cases were diagnosed during the autumn and winter months. The geographic distribution also showed seasonal patterns. Overall, oropharyngeal tularaemia (41.1 %) was the most common clinical presentation, followed by glandular (14.4 %), typhoidal (14.4 %), respiratory (13.3 %) and ulceroglandular (12.8 %) tularaemia. From January to April, oropharyngeal tularaemia dominated, from May to September, ulceroglandular tularaemia was most common, whereas from October to December, there was an almost even distribution between several clinical forms of tularaemia. Eighty-five (47.2 %) of all tularaemia cases were admitted to, or seen as outpatients in, hospitals. An unexpectedly high number (3.9 %) of the patients had positive blood culture with Francisella tularensis. The clinical manifestations of tularaemia in Norway in 2011 were diverse, and changing throughout the year. Classification was sometimes difficult due to uncharacteristic symptoms and unknown mode of transmission. In rodent years, tularaemia is an important differential diagnosis to keep in mind at all times of the year for a variety of clinical symptoms.
PubMed ID
24874046 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure phenotypes in relation to the beta-adducin C1797T polymorphism in the European Project on Genes in Hypertension (EPOGH).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183494
Source
Blood Press Monit. 2003 Aug;8(4):151-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Valérie Tikhonoff
Tatiana Kuznetsova
Katarzyna Stolarz
Giuseppe Bianchi
Edoardo Casiglia
Kalina Kawecka-Jaszcz
Yuri Nikitin
Laura Tizzone
Ji-Guang Wang
Jan A Staessen
Author Affiliation
Study Coordinating Centre, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Molecular and Cardiovascular Research, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. valerie.tikhonoff@unipd.it
Source
Blood Press Monit. 2003 Aug;8(4):151-4
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Pressure - genetics
Calmodulin-Binding Proteins - genetics
Demography
Europe - epidemiology
Family Health
Female
Genotype
Humans
Hypertension - genetics
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Phenotype
Poland - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Russia - epidemiology
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The association of blood pressure (BP) with the beta-adducin C1797 T polymorphism was investigated in 388 men and 456 women aged 18-60 years recruited from three European populations (Cracow, Poland, n=300; Novosibirsk, Russian Federation, n=274; Mirano, Italy; n=270). Phenotypes included conventional measurements of BP obtained at the second contact with the subjects and 24-h ambulatory BP. Subjects were genotyped for the beta-adducin C1797 T polymorphism. Both a population-based association study and a family-based analysis were performed.
Urinary sodium excretion was higher in Cracow than in Mirano (241 versus 185 mmol/day, P
PubMed ID
14517477 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit. Background information for Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3551
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):523-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage 99501, USA.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):523-5
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Demography
Diet
Family Characteristics
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Inuits
Life Style
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The cancer patterns among Inuit in the Circumpolar area have shown some marked differences from other populations in the world. The current paper summarizes important risk factors in Alaska including the physical environment, diet, alcohol, tobacco; the populations at risk; the health care delivery system; and cancer registration. This information is important for the interpretation of the incidence pattern for the Circumpolar Inuit collectively and for the understanding of differences between the various Inuit populations of the North.
PubMed ID
8813057 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit. Background information for cancer patterns in Canadian Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3550
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):527-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
L A Gaudette
S. Freitag
R. Dufour
M. Baikie
R N Gao
M. Wideman
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):527-33
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Diet
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life expectancy
Life Style
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Northwest Territories - epidemiology - ethnology
Quebec - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The cancer pattern among Inuit in the Circumpolar area is remarkably different from those of other populations in the world. The current paper summarizes the most important risk factors in Canadian Inuit residing in the Northwest Territories, northern Quebec (Nunavik) and Labrador, particularly during the time period 1969-1988 covered by the study. Factors considered include: the geographic area and physical environment; population and human environment, including fertility and life expectancy; lifestyle and diet, including tobacco and alcohol use; other lifestyle factors, and health conditions; and health services and cultural accessibility. Development of the cancer registry and population databases supporting the analysis of cancer rates is described. The information in the present paper is needed to interpret cancer incidence patterns and differences among the Circumpolar Inuit of Canada, Alaska and Greenland.
PubMed ID
8813058 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit. Background information for the cancer pattern in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3549
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):535-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):535-7
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Diet
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The cancer pattern among Inuit in the Circumpolar area have shown marked differences to other populations in the world. The current paper summarises important risk factors in Greenland, including the physical environment, diet, alcohol, tobacco and other lifestyle factors. Details on population structure and history, health care and cancer registration are also included. This information is important for the interpretation of the incidence pattern for the Circumpolar Inuit collectively and for the understanding of differences between the various Inuit populations of the North.
PubMed ID
8813059 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):617-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
Y P Nikitin
N S Boichenko
T I Astakhova
A T Dokuchaev
E V Shubnikov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, USSR.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):617-9
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Diet
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Male
Morbidity
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Russia - epidemiology - ethnology
Topography, Medical
Abstract
Using the framework of the Native Cancer Registry, cancer morbidity among Russian Inuit can be obtained from 1960 onwards. Earlier data are available, but have not been verified. Unfortunately, the absence of accurate demographic data for the Native population of about 16 000 people, including the increase from 1 149 to 1 452 Inuit between 1970 and 1989 prevents comparison and analysis of morbidity and mortality data with the non-Inuit population. Nevertheless, the number of cancers has risen in the Native population of Chukotka during the last decade (1979-1988), with a predominance of oesophagus, lung and stomach cancer among the Inuit. In contrast, no cases were observed of the salivary gland, nasopharyngeal and cervical cancers common in other Inuit populations.
PubMed ID
8813070 View in PubMed
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The case of Montréal's missing food deserts: evaluation of accessibility to food supermarkets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165206
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2007;6:4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Philippe Apparicio
Marie-Soleil Cloutier
Richard Shearmur
Author Affiliation
Spatial Analysis and Regional Economics Laboratory, Institut national de la recherche scientifique--Urbanisation, Culture et Société, Montréal, Québec, Canada. philippe_apparicio@ucs.inrs.ca
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2007;6:4
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Cluster analysis
Food Industry - economics
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Poverty
Quebec
Socioeconomic Factors
Topography, Medical
Abstract
Access to varied, healthy and inexpensive foods is an important public health concern that has been widely documented. Consequently, there is an increasing interest in identifying food deserts, that is, socially deprived areas within cities that have poor access to food retailers. In this paper we propose a methodology based on three measures of accessibility to supermarkets calculated using geographic information systems (GIS), and on exploratory multivariate statistical analysis (hierarchical cluster analysis), which we use to identify food deserts in Montréal.
First, the use of three measures of accessibility to supermarkets is very helpful in identifying food deserts according to several dimensions: proximity (distance to the nearest supermarket), diversity (number of supermarkets within a distance of less than 1000 metres) and variety in terms of food and prices (average distance to the three closest different chain-name supermarkets). Next, the cluster analysis applied to the three measures of accessibility to supermarkets and to a social deprivation index demonstrates that there are very few problematic food deserts in Montréal. In fact, census tracts classified as socially deprived and with low accessibility to supermarkets are, on average, 816 metres away from the nearest supermarket and within 1.34 kilometres of three different chain-name supermarkets.
We conclude that food deserts do not represent a major problem in Montréal. Since geographic accessibility to healthy food is not a major issue in Montréal, prevention efforts should be directed toward the understanding of other mechanisms leading to an unhealthy diet, rather than attempting to promote an even spatial distribution of supermarkets.
Notes
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2000 Mar;3(1):31-810786721
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2002 Jan;22(1):23-911777675
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jan;54(1):119-3211820676
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Aug 24;325(7361):436-812193363
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Mar;58(3):208-1514966233
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Apr;95(4):660-715798127
Cites: Appetite. 2005 Oct;45(2):195-715927303
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Feb;96(2):325-3116380567
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Feb;35(1):100-416338945
PubMed ID
17295912 View in PubMed
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Circulation and diagnostics of Puumala virus in Norway: nephropatia epidemica incidence and rodent population dynamics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284592
Source
APMIS. 2017 Aug;125(8):732-742
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Natacha Milhano
Lars Korslund
Magnus Evander
Clas Ahlm
Kirsti Vainio
Susanne G Dudman
Åshild Andreassen
Source
APMIS. 2017 Aug;125(8):732-742
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Arvicolinae - growth & development
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Female
Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Population Dynamics
Puumala virus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seasons
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology
Serum - virology
Topography, Medical
Young Adult
Abstract
Hantaviruses pose a public health concern worldwide causing haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Puumala virus (PUUV) is the most prevalent hantavirus in Central and Northern Europe, and causes a mild form of HFRS, also known as nephropathia epidemica (NE). In nature, the main host of PUUV is the bank vole (Myodes glareolus), and transmission to humans occurs through inhalation of aerosols from rodent excreta. Nephropathia epidemica is particularly prevalent in Nordic countries, however, few studies of PUUV have been performed in Norway. The aim of this study was to analyse the dynamics of PUUV in Norway and compare with bank vole population dynamics, and also to complement the current diagnostic methodology of NE in Norway. Our results showed a significant seasonal and geographical variation of NE, and a general parallel peak trend between bank vole population densities and human NE incidence. A real-time and a nested PCR were successfully established as an invaluable diagnostic tool, with detection and sequencing of PUUV in a human serum sample for the first time in Norway. Phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of the obtained human sample with previous Norwegian bank vole isolates.
PubMed ID
28585306 View in PubMed
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[Cleft lip and cleft palate birth rate in Bavaria before and after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58291
Source
Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir. 2004 Mar;8(2):106-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
H. Scherb
E. Weigelt
Author Affiliation
GSF-Forschungszentrum für Umwelt und Gesundheit, Neuherberg. scherb@gsf.de
Source
Mund Kiefer Gesichtschir. 2004 Mar;8(2):106-10
Date
Mar-2004
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Accidents, Radiation
Cleft Lip - epidemiology
Cleft Palate - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
English Abstract
Female
Germany
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Topography, Medical
Ukraine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cleft lip and palates (CLP) occur with a frequency of between 1 and 2 cases in 1000 live births and thus belong to the most frequent congenital anomalies. In the former German Democratic Republic (GDR), records covering 1967-1989 for CLP newborns show a 9.4% increase of the prevalence of CLP from 1987 to 1989, possibly due to Chernobyl. DATA AND STATISTICAL METHOD: In Bavaria, all congenital malformations in children's hospitals have been recorded from 1984 to 1991. Among these data, 1324 cases with CLP were found. A spatial-temporal analysis aimed at uncovering a possible association of the CLP occurrence with the Chernobyl fallout on a district level, as well as a synoptic analysis of the GDR and Bavarian data, were carried out. RESULTS: In Bavaria, from October 1986 to December 1990, the CLP frequency increased by 9.5% (p=0.10) relative to the trend as computed from the remaining years. The association of CLP rates with fallout on a district level is reflected by a significant relative risk (RR) per kBq/m(2) of RR=1.008 (p=0.03). A synoptic analysis of the Bavarian data and the GDR data restricted to the overlapping time window from 1984 to 1989 discloses a simultaneous significant jump of the CLP prevalence by 8.6% (p=0.02) after 1986. CONCLUSION: The presumption of a long-term increase of CLP after exposure to Chernobyl fallout is corroborated by the analysis of the Bavarian congenital malformation data.
PubMed ID
15045533 View in PubMed
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55 records – page 1 of 6.