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69 records – page 1 of 7.

Agricultural contamination of groundwater as a possible risk factor for growth restriction or prematurity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194907
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2001 Apr;43(4):377-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
J. Bukowski
G. Somers
J. Bryanton
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre, University of Prince Edward Island.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2001 Apr;43(4):377-83
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Case-Control Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nitrates - adverse effects - analysis
Obstetric Labor, Premature - chemically induced - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prince Edward Island - epidemiology
Risk factors
Topography, Medical
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - analysis
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
Agricultural activity on Prince Edward Island poses a potential hazard to groundwater, which is the sole source of drinking water on the island. This study investigates the potential impact of groundwater nitrate exposure on prematurity and intrauterine growth restriction on Prince Edward Island. A total of 210 intrauterine growth restriction cases, 336 premature births, and 4098 controls were abstracted from a database of all Island births. An ecological measure of groundwater nitrate level was used to gauge potential exposure to agriculturally contaminated drinking water. The higher nitrate exposure categories were positively associated with intrauterine growth restriction and prematurity, and significant dose-response trends were seen, even after adjustment for several important covariates. Nevertheless, these risks must be interpreted cautiously because of the ecological nature of this exposure metric. An investigation using nitrate levels for individual study subjects is needed to confirm this association.
PubMed ID
11322099 View in PubMed
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Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):492-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1968
mass of the state. The southern boundary of the state is 3,200 miles long; and the total length of the Alaskan coastline, including islands, is in excess of 32,000 miles--or 50% longer than the coastline of the conterminous 48 states. Topography and Climate.-The general land form of the state
  1 document  
Author
FitzGerald, J.H
Author Affiliation
Anchorage, Alaska
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):492-500
Date
Oct-1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic
Climate
Population trends
Resource development
Topography
Documents

67-10-Alaska the Land and the People.pdf

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All-time high tularaemia incidence in Norway in 2011: report from the national surveillance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263869
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;33(11):1919-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
K W Larssen
K. Bergh
B T Heier
L. Vold
J E Afset
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;33(11):1919-26
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Francisella tularensis - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Seasons
Topography, Medical
Tularemia - epidemiology - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Tularaemia has mainly been a sporadic disease in Norway. In 2011, 180 persons (3.7 per 100,000 population) were diagnosed with tularaemia. This article describes the epidemiological and clinical features of tularaemia cases during a year with exceptionally high tularaemia incidence. Data from the national reference laboratory for tularaemia combined with epidemiological data from the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (MSIS) were used. The incidence of tularaemia varied greatly between counties, but almost every county was involved. The majority (77.8 %) of the cases were diagnosed during the autumn and winter months. The geographic distribution also showed seasonal patterns. Overall, oropharyngeal tularaemia (41.1 %) was the most common clinical presentation, followed by glandular (14.4 %), typhoidal (14.4 %), respiratory (13.3 %) and ulceroglandular (12.8 %) tularaemia. From January to April, oropharyngeal tularaemia dominated, from May to September, ulceroglandular tularaemia was most common, whereas from October to December, there was an almost even distribution between several clinical forms of tularaemia. Eighty-five (47.2 %) of all tularaemia cases were admitted to, or seen as outpatients in, hospitals. An unexpectedly high number (3.9 %) of the patients had positive blood culture with Francisella tularensis. The clinical manifestations of tularaemia in Norway in 2011 were diverse, and changing throughout the year. Classification was sometimes difficult due to uncharacteristic symptoms and unknown mode of transmission. In rodent years, tularaemia is an important differential diagnosis to keep in mind at all times of the year for a variety of clinical symptoms.
PubMed ID
24874046 View in PubMed
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Anisometropia of spherical equivalent and astigmatism among myopes: a 23-year follow-up study of prevalence and changes from childhood to adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285954
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2017 Aug;95(5):518-524
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Olavi Pärssinen
Markku Kauppinen
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2017 Aug;95(5):518-524
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anisometropia - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Astigmatism - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Axial Length, Eye
Child
Cornea - pathology
Corneal Topography
Disease Progression
Eyeglasses
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Myopia - complications - physiopathology - therapy
Prevalence
Refraction, Ocular
Young Adult
Abstract
To study anisometropia of spherical equivalent and astigmatism from the onset of myopia at school age to adulthood.
A total of 240 myopic schoolchildren (mean age 10.9 years), with no previous spectacles, were recruited during 1983-1984 to a randomized 3-year clinical trial of bifocal treatment of myopia. Examinations with subjective cyclopedic refraction were repeated 3 years later (follow-up 1) for 238 subjects and thereafter at the mean ages of 23.2 (follow-up 2) and 33.9 years (follow-up 3) for 178 and 134 subjects. After exclusions, the 102 subjects who attended all three follow-ups were included in the analyses. Corneal refractive power and astigmatism and anterior chamber depth was measured with Pentacam topography and axial length with IOL master at study end. Prevalence and changes in anisometropia of spherical equivalent (AnisoSE) and astigmatism (AnisoAST) and their relationships with refractive and axial measures were studied.
Mean (±SD) of spherical equivalent (SE), AnisoSE and AnisoAST increased from baseline to follow-up end from -1.44 ± 0.57 D to -5.11 ± 2.23 D, from 0.28 ± 0.30 D to 0.68 ± 0.69 D and from 0.14 ± 0.18 D to 0.37 ± 0.36 D, respectively. Prevalence of AnioSE, =1 D, increased from 5% to 22.6% throughout follow-up. Higher AnisoSE was associated with SE in the less myopic eye at baseline and at follow-up 1, and with SE in the more myopic eye in follow-ups 2 and 3 in adulthood. At study end, AnisoSE was associated with the interocular difference in axial length (AL) (r = 0.612, p 
PubMed ID
28481050 View in PubMed
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Astigmatism among myopics and its changes from childhood to adult age: a 23-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268461
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2015 May;93(3):276-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Olavi Pärssinen
Markku Kauppinen
Anne Viljanen
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2015 May;93(3):276-83
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Astigmatism - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Axial Length, Eye
Child
Cornea - physiopathology
Corneal Topography
Disease Progression
Eyeglasses
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Myopia - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Prevalence
Refraction, Ocular - physiology
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
To study the prevalence of and changes in astigmatism from the onset of myopia at school age.
Two hundred and forty myopic schoolchildren (mean age 10.9 years), with no previous spectacles, were recruited during 1983-1984 to a randomized 3-year clinical trial of bifocal treatment of myopia. Three annual examinations with subjective cycloplegic refraction were performed for 237-238 subjects. Subsequent examinations were performed at the mean ages of 23.2 and 33.9 years for 178 and 163 subjects, and the last examination, including data from prescriptions of different ophthalmologists, for 32 subjects. Corneal topography was studied at baseline, at the 3-year follow-up and at the two adulthood follow-ups. Prevalence and changes in refractive astigmatism (RA), in its polar values J0 and J45, and corneal astigmatism (CA) were studied.
Mean RA of the right eye increased during follow-up from 0.26 D (SD) ± 0.30 to 0.79 D ± 0.74. Mean CA was 1.07 D ± 0.74 at study end. The prevalence of RA =0.25 or =1.00 D increased from 54.9 and 3.8% to 83.4 and 34.4%, respectively. The main direction of the axis of RA and its polar value J0 and CA changed mainly through sphericity, from against the rule (ATR) to with the rule during the follow-up. There was a negative correlation between RA and spherical refraction in the ATR group at end of follow-up. Changes in RA were associated with increase in myopia and with changes in CA.
The prevalence and mean amount of RA associated with CA increased, and the axis of astigmatism changed among myopics during the 23-year follow-up.
PubMed ID
25384542 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure phenotypes in relation to the beta-adducin C1797T polymorphism in the European Project on Genes in Hypertension (EPOGH).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183494
Source
Blood Press Monit. 2003 Aug;8(4):151-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Valérie Tikhonoff
Tatiana Kuznetsova
Katarzyna Stolarz
Giuseppe Bianchi
Edoardo Casiglia
Kalina Kawecka-Jaszcz
Yuri Nikitin
Laura Tizzone
Ji-Guang Wang
Jan A Staessen
Author Affiliation
Study Coordinating Centre, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Molecular and Cardiovascular Research, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. valerie.tikhonoff@unipd.it
Source
Blood Press Monit. 2003 Aug;8(4):151-4
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Pressure - genetics
Calmodulin-Binding Proteins - genetics
Demography
Europe - epidemiology
Family Health
Female
Genotype
Humans
Hypertension - genetics
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Phenotype
Poland - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Russia - epidemiology
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The association of blood pressure (BP) with the beta-adducin C1797 T polymorphism was investigated in 388 men and 456 women aged 18-60 years recruited from three European populations (Cracow, Poland, n=300; Novosibirsk, Russian Federation, n=274; Mirano, Italy; n=270). Phenotypes included conventional measurements of BP obtained at the second contact with the subjects and 24-h ambulatory BP. Subjects were genotyped for the beta-adducin C1797 T polymorphism. Both a population-based association study and a family-based analysis were performed.
Urinary sodium excretion was higher in Cracow than in Mirano (241 versus 185 mmol/day, P
PubMed ID
14517477 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit. Background information for Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3551
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):523-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
A P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage 99501, USA.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):523-5
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Demography
Diet
Family Characteristics
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Inuits
Life Style
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The cancer patterns among Inuit in the Circumpolar area have shown some marked differences from other populations in the world. The current paper summarizes important risk factors in Alaska including the physical environment, diet, alcohol, tobacco; the populations at risk; the health care delivery system; and cancer registration. This information is important for the interpretation of the incidence pattern for the Circumpolar Inuit collectively and for the understanding of differences between the various Inuit populations of the North.
PubMed ID
8813057 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit. Background information for cancer patterns in Canadian Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3550
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):527-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
L A Gaudette
S. Freitag
R. Dufour
M. Baikie
R N Gao
M. Wideman
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):527-33
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Diet
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life expectancy
Life Style
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Northwest Territories - epidemiology - ethnology
Quebec - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The cancer pattern among Inuit in the Circumpolar area is remarkably different from those of other populations in the world. The current paper summarizes the most important risk factors in Canadian Inuit residing in the Northwest Territories, northern Quebec (Nunavik) and Labrador, particularly during the time period 1969-1988 covered by the study. Factors considered include: the geographic area and physical environment; population and human environment, including fertility and life expectancy; lifestyle and diet, including tobacco and alcohol use; other lifestyle factors, and health conditions; and health services and cultural accessibility. Development of the cancer registry and population databases supporting the analysis of cancer rates is described. The information in the present paper is needed to interpret cancer incidence patterns and differences among the Circumpolar Inuit of Canada, Alaska and Greenland.
PubMed ID
8813058 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit. Background information for the cancer pattern in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3549
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):535-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):535-7
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Diet
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The cancer pattern among Inuit in the Circumpolar area have shown marked differences to other populations in the world. The current paper summarises important risk factors in Greenland, including the physical environment, diet, alcohol, tobacco and other lifestyle factors. Details on population structure and history, health care and cancer registration are also included. This information is important for the interpretation of the incidence pattern for the Circumpolar Inuit collectively and for the understanding of differences between the various Inuit populations of the North.
PubMed ID
8813059 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):617-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
Y P Nikitin
N S Boichenko
T I Astakhova
A T Dokuchaev
E V Shubnikov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk, USSR.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):617-9
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Diet
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Male
Morbidity
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Russia - epidemiology - ethnology
Topography, Medical
Abstract
Using the framework of the Native Cancer Registry, cancer morbidity among Russian Inuit can be obtained from 1960 onwards. Earlier data are available, but have not been verified. Unfortunately, the absence of accurate demographic data for the Native population of about 16 000 people, including the increase from 1 149 to 1 452 Inuit between 1970 and 1989 prevents comparison and analysis of morbidity and mortality data with the non-Inuit population. Nevertheless, the number of cancers has risen in the Native population of Chukotka during the last decade (1979-1988), with a predominance of oesophagus, lung and stomach cancer among the Inuit. In contrast, no cases were observed of the salivary gland, nasopharyngeal and cervical cancers common in other Inuit populations.
PubMed ID
8813070 View in PubMed
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69 records – page 1 of 7.