Skip header and navigation

Refine By

87 records – page 1 of 9.

[A 2% sodium monofluorophosphate toothpaste's caries preventive effect in a Danish fluoride area]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42520
Source
Tandlaegebladet. 1975 Nov;79(20):793-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1975

Acceptability of fluoride use in Finnish municipalities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239618
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1985;13(3):109-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
H. Tuutti
E. Honkala
J. Laurinkari
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1985;13(3):109-12
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Attitude to Health
Finland
Fluoridation
Health Surveys
Humans
Milk
Mouthwashes
Public Opinion
Sodium Chloride
Toothpastes
Water supply
Abstract
The aim of this study was, firstly, to determine what methods of delivering fluorides might be acceptable to Finnish municipalities and, secondly, to investigate which characteristics of the municipalities best explain the variation in acceptability of fluorides. A sample, composed of 46 Finnish municipalities and representing the communes according to number of inhabitants was drawn and a mail survey sent to decision-makers (n = 1922). In this survey we assessed the characteristics of each commune and its decision-makers and asked how acceptable various methods of fluoride delivery were. The acceptability of the various methods was: toothpaste 95%, gels and varnishes 81%, rinses 63%, salt 48%, piped water 33%, and milk 11%. In industrialized communes these methods of delivery were usually slightly better accepted than in non-industrialized areas. Acceptability of fluorides seemed to differ in the various regions of Finland, Uusimaa region being the most liberal towards use of fluorides. Members of the labour parties seemed to accept piped water containing fluoride and fluoridated milk significantly more often than did conservatives. Among decision-makers, the various methods of delivery were best accepted by dentists, physicians and members of health councils.
PubMed ID
3839595 View in PubMed
Less detail

An 11-year follow-up study of dental caries after discontinuation of school-based fluoride programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75812
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1990 Aug;48(4):257-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
O. Haugejorden
T. Lervik
J M Birkeland
L. Jorkjend
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1990 Aug;48(4):257-63
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
DMF Index
Dental Care
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Fluorides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mouthwashes
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
School Dentistry
Toothpaste
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the caries-preventive effect of school-based programs with fluoride (F) mouthrinsing or toothbrushing was evident at the end of a post-treatment follow-up period of 11 years. Two groups of subjects examined at 14 years of age (born in 1960), who had participated in fortnightly F rinsing (n = 52) or in F brushing 4-5 times a year at school (n = 50), were re-examined radiographically and completed a questionnaire at age 25 years. A comparison group of 25-year-olds (n = 51) was also included. Analyses of variance showed that the benefits of participation in school-based F programs seem to have been lost. It appears that these caries-preventive programs have delayed rather than prevented caries and that F toothpaste and other caries-preventive efforts have been insufficient to avert a substantial caries activity during the follow-up period.
PubMed ID
2220333 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appropriate uses of fluorides for children: guidelines from the Canadian Workshop on the Evaluation of Current Recommendations Concerning Fluorides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219619
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Dec 15;149(12):1787-93
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-15-1993
Author
D C Clark
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Dec 15;149(12):1787-93
Date
Dec-15-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Fluoridation - adverse effects - economics - standards
Fluorides - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Fluorosis, Dental - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Prevalence
Toothpastes
Abstract
To prevent fluorosis caused by excessive fluoride ingestion by revising recommendations for fluoride intake by children.
Limiting fluoride ingestion from fluoridated water, fluoride supplements and fluoride dentifrices.
Reduction in the prevalence of dental fluorosis and continued prevention of dental caries.
Before the workshop, experts prepared comprehensive literature reviews of fluoride therapies, fluoride ingestion and the prevalence and causes of dental fluorosis. The papers, which were peer-reviewed, revised and circulated to the workshop participants, formed the basis of the workshop discussions.
Recommendations to limit fluoride intake were vigorously debated before being adopted as the consensus opinion of the workshop group.
Decrease in the prevalence of dental fluorosis with continuing preventive effects of fluoride use. The only significant cost would be in preparing new, low-concentration fluoride products for distribution.
Fluoride supplementation should be limited to children 3 years of age and older in areas where there is less than 0.3 ppm of fluoride in the water supply. Children in all areas should use only a "pea-sized" amount of fluoride dentifrice no more than twice daily under the supervision of an adult.
These recommendations are almost identical to changes to recommendations for the use of fluoride supplements recently proposed by a group of European countries.
The workshop was organized by Dr. D. Christopher Clark, of the University of British Columbia, and Drs. Hardy Limeback and Ralph C. Burgess, of the University of Toronto, and funded by Proctor and Gamble Inc., Toronto, the Medical Research Council of Canada and Health Canada (formerly the Department of National Health and Welfare). The recommendations were formally adopted by the Canadian Dental Association in April 1993.
Notes
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1989 Spring;49(2):78-822619788
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1989;49(5 Spec No):279-892681730
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1988 Fall;48(4):233-403054080
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1988 Apr;116(4):490-53259956
Cites: J Dent Res. 1988 May;67(5):802-63284939
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1988 Feb;16(1):11-53422610
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1986 Fall;46(4):184-73465957
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1986 Jul;113(1):29-333461057
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1985 Oct;42(4):701-74050730
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1985 Jun;13(3):164-73860339
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1984 Jan;108(1):56-96582115
Cites: Swed Dent J. 1982;6(6):233-86963006
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1982 Dec;10(6):335-96961984
Cites: Arch Oral Biol. 1969 Jan;14(1):105-195250255
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1993 Jun;21(3):118-258348782
Cites: Br Dent J. 1992 May 9;172(9):3571356390
Cites: J Dent Res. 1992 May;71(5):1228-371607439
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1991 Fall;51(4):251-91941778
Cites: J Dent Res. 1991 Jul;70(7):1022-82066481
Cites: Caries Res. 1990;24(4):290-72276168
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 1990 Summer;50(4):276-812391676
Cites: Adv Dent Res. 1989 Sep;3(2):104-92701155
Cites: J Dent Res. 1990 Feb;69 Spec No:742-50; discussion 820-32179336
Cites: Int Dent J. 1989 Dec;39(4):263-82606563
Cites: Caries Res. 1990;24(1):72-92403486
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Dec;130(6):1199-2082589311
Comment In: CMAJ. 1994 Sep 1;151(5):5178069794
PubMed ID
8261348 View in PubMed
Less detail

Approximal caries development in adolescents with low to moderate caries risk after different 3-year school-based supervised fluoride mouth rinsing programmes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172262
Source
Caries Res. 2005 Nov-Dec;39(6):529-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ulla Moberg Sköld
Dowen Birkhed
Eva Borg
Lars G Petersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dental Care, Vastra Gotaland Region, Goteborg, Sweden.
Source
Caries Res. 2005 Nov-Dec;39(6):529-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Cariostatic Agents - administration & dosage
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Mouthwashes - administration & dosage - chemistry
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sodium Fluoride - administration & dosage
Sweden - epidemiology
Toothpastes - administration & dosage - chemistry
Abstract
The aim was to evaluate a 3-year randomised controlled trial of school-based fluoride mouth rinsing (FMR) on approximal caries development in 13- to 16-year-olds with low to moderate caries risk. The adolescents used F toothpaste at home and underwent prophylactic treatment at yearly check-ups at public dental clinics. Out of 788 randomly selected 13-year-olds, 622 completed the trial, carried out in 1999-2003. Supervised by a dental nurse, the subjects rinsed with a 0.2% NaF solution at different intervals. Group 1 rinsed their teeth on the first three schooldays every semester; group 2 on the first three and the last three schooldays every semester; group 3 on three consecutive days once a month during semesters; group 4 once every fortnight during semesters, and group 5 (control) did not rinse. Radiographic recording of approximal caries was performed. FMR on the three first and the three last schooldays every semester (group 2) had a prevented fraction of 59%, with approximal enamel lesions as a diagnostic threshold. Corresponding figures for groups 1, 3 and 4 were 30, 47 and 41%, respectively. The control group differed statistically from groups 2-4 for new enamel and dentin lesions and fillings (p
PubMed ID
16251800 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the risk of an excess fluoride intake among Swedish children in households with private wells--expanding static single-source methods to a probabilistic multi-exposure-pathway approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256480
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Jul;68:192-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Anna Augustsson
Tobias Berger
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. Electronic address: anna.augustsson@lnu.se.
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Jul;68:192-9
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Drinking Water - chemistry
Dust - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Fluorides - analysis - toxicity
Food analysis
Humans
Models, Theoretical
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Risk assessment
Soil Pollutants - chemistry
Sweden
Toothpastes - chemistry
Water supply
Abstract
It is often assumed that water consumption is the major route of exposure for fluoride and analysis of water fluoride content is the most common approach for ensuring that the daily intake is not too high. In the present study, the risk of excess intake was characterized for children in households with private wells in Kalmar County, Sweden, where the natural geology shows local enrichments in fluorine. By comparing water concentrations with the WHO drinking water guideline (1.5 mg/L), it was found that 24% of the ca. 4800 sampled wells had a concentration above this limit, hence providing a figure for the number of children in the households concerned assessed to be at risk using this straightforward approach. The risk of an excess intake could, alternatively, also be characterized based on a tolerable daily intake (in this case the US EPA RfD of 0.06 mg/kg-day). The exposure to be evaluated was calculated using a probabilistic approach, where the variability in all exposure factors was considered, again for the same study population. The proportion of children assessed to be at risk after exposure from drinking water now increased to 48%, and when the probabilistic model was adjusted to also include other possible exposure pathways; beverages and food, ingestion of toothpaste, oral soil intake and dust inhalation, the number increased to 77%. Firstly, these results show how the risk characterization is affected by the basis of comparison. In this example, both of the reference values used are widely acknowledged. Secondly, it illustrates how much of the total exposure may be overlooked when only focusing on one exposure pathway, and thirdly, it shows the importance of considering the variability in all relevant pathways.
PubMed ID
24747328 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of instrumental activities of daily living and handgrip strength with oral self-care among home-dwelling elderly 75+.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128053
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kaija Komulainen
Pekka Ylöstalo
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Piia Ruoppi
Matti Knuuttila
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. kaija.komulainen@uef.fi
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque Index
Dentition
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpastes - therapeutic use
Xerostomia - classification
Abstract
To study the associations of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and the handgrip strength with oral self-care among dentate home-dwelling elderly people in Finland.
The study analysed data for 168 dentate participants (mean age 80.6 years) in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study. Each participant received a clinical oral examination and structured interview in 2004-2005. Functional status was assessed using the IADL scale and handgrip strength was measured using handheld dynamometry.
Study participants with high IADL (scores 7-8) had odds ratios (ORs) for brushing their teeth at least twice a day of 2.7 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-6.8], for using toothpaste at least twice a day of 2.0 (CI 0.8-5.2) and for having good oral hygiene of 2.8 (CI 1.0-8.3) when compared with participants with low IADL (scores =6). Participants in the upper tertiles of the handgrip strength had ORs for brushing the teeth at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.9), for using the toothpaste at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.8) and for good oral hygiene of 1.1 (CI 0.5-2.4) in comparison with the study subjects in the lowest tertile of handgrip strength.
The results of this study suggest that the functional status, measured by means of the IADL scale, but not handgrip strength, is an important determinant of oral self-care among the home-dwelling elderly.
PubMed ID
22239745 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes to and experience of dental care among 50-year-olds in two Swedish counties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62826
Source
Swed Dent J. 1999;23(2-3):87-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
L. Unell
B. Söderfeldt
A. Halling
D. Birkhed
Author Affiliation
Community Dental Health Unit, Orebro County Council, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1999;23(2-3):87-96
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - economics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Health Behavior
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient satisfaction
Plants, Toxic
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Tobacco, Smokeless
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpaste - therapeutic use
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate attitudes to and experiences of dental care in a population, born 1942. The following items were studied: opinions of general and oral health, attitudes to and experiences of dental care, dental care habits, experiences of latest visit to a dentist, tobacco habits and use of various dental hygiene articles. A cross-sectional mail questionnaire was sent in 1992 to all 50-year-olds in two Swedish counties, Orebro and Ostergotland, totally 8888 persons; the response rate was 71%. Of the population 89%, indicated good health. Satisfaction with dental care was high, 94%. 26% stated attendance to a dentist twice or more per year, and 64% at least once a year. As to expenses, 78% paid less than 1000 SEK the last year. Concerning the latest visit, 38% reported painless treatment, 37% no inconvenience, and 55% good care. The duration of the latest visit included on an average 27 min in travel time, 7 min in waiting time and 27 min in treatment time. Information about oral hygiene was given to 29% and about cost for treatment to 47% of the interviewed. There were 28% daily smokers. Snuff was daily used by 10% of the males. Toothbrushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste seemed to be the standard oral hygiene procedure and was reported by 80% of the respondents.
PubMed ID
10431344 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caries decline before fluoride toothpaste was available: earlier and greater decline in the rural north than in southwestern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32235
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Feb;59(1):7-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
J M Birkeland
O. Haugejorden
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology-Cariology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway. jan.birkeland@odont.uib.no
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Feb;59(1):7-13
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Cariostatic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentists
Educational Status
Fluorides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Mouthwashes - therapeutic use
Norway - epidemiology
Population
Preventive Dentistry
Regression Analysis
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
School Dentistry
Socioeconomic Factors
Tablets
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Toothbrushing
Toothpaste - therapeutic use
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors related to caries in 6-17-year-olds in 2 groups of Norwegian counties between 1966 and 1983. The average number of surfaces filled and permanent teeth extracted due to caries declined in the 4 northern counties from 1967. An increase was recorded in the 7 southwestern counties until 1971, then a decline. In the 1960s significantly more surfaces were filled and teeth extracted in the north compared to the southwest. Based on intra-county comparisons, the decline in surfaces treated was greater in the north between 1967 and 1983; 5.4 +/- 0.4 vs 3.7 +/- 0.7, P
PubMed ID
11318045 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caries development after substitution of supervised fluoride rinses and toothbrushings by unsupervised use of fluoride toothpaste.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216788
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;22(6):421-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
S. Karjalainen
A L Eriksson
M. Ruokola
A. Toivonen
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Dentistry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;22(6):421-4
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
DMF Index
Dental Care
Dental caries - etiology - prevention & control
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mouthwashes
Oral Hygiene
Patient Care Planning
Schools, Dental
Self Administration
Sodium Fluoride - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Tooth Eruption
Toothbrushing
Toothpastes
Abstract
In a nonfluoridated community of Finland, where fortnightly fluoride rinsing with 0.2% sodium fluoride has been used for nearly two decades, a total of 313 children 7-8 yr old were recruited and randomly divided into two groups. 206 children completed the 3-yr trial. The control group (n = 94) participated in the rinsing program which included supervised toothbrushings, while the test group (n = 112) received a new fluoride toothpaste tube (0.15% F) for home use every second month. Annual dental recordings, treatment plannings and the treatment itself were all carried out by one clinician. At the end of the study the number of caries-free children of the toothpaste group was lower (P
PubMed ID
7882656 View in PubMed
Less detail

87 records – page 1 of 9.