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Adoption of fluoride-based caries preventive innovations in a public dental service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38556
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1988 Feb;16(1):5-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
O. Haugejorden
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1988 Feb;16(1):5-10
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Communication
Comparative Study
Decision Making
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dental Clinics
Diffusion of Innovation
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Humans
Mouthwashes
Norway
Retrospective Studies
School Dentistry
Toothbrushing
Abstract
In dentistry comparative studies of diffusion of disease preventive innovations are rare and usually atheoretical. For these reasons the present study was designed 1) to determine whether or not normal distribution assumptions applied to decisions to adopt caries preventive fluoride programs in a public dental service; 2) to compare rates of adoption of two school-based and one clinic-based fluoride program, and 3) to look for evidence indicating which type of decision-making may have been involved. The programs studied were school-based fluoride brushing 4-5 times per year, fluoride mouthrinsing at least once a month, and professional topical fluoride applications at least once a year. Data were collected by postal questionnaires from public dental officers in Norway in 1972, 1977 and 1982. To determine the length of time which had elapsed from the time of innovation of the technologies to adoption, the dental literature was reviewed. The adoption curves for school-based fluoride brushing and rinsing, as well as for clinic-based topical fluoride application did not comply with the normal distribution assumption. The time lapse from innovation to adoption was in excess of 10 yr and the rates of adoption differed between programs. Decision-making would appear to have been primarily individual or collective. It was concluded that generalization beyond the innovations studied and the social and organizational setting of this particular investigation is inadmissible. Consequently, there is a need for more and larger scale comparative analytical studies to increase our understanding of diffusion and adoption of innovations in dentistry.
PubMed ID
3422620 View in PubMed
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Age and condition of toothbrushes in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249853
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1977 Jun;73(3):133-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1977
Author
H. Murtomaa
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1977 Jun;73(3):133-7
Date
Jun-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Toothbrushing
PubMed ID
896734 View in PubMed
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Age and maintenance of removable dentures in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224270
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1992 Mar;19(2):123-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
H. Murtomaa
M. Könönen
P. Laine
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1992 Mar;19(2):123-8
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Dental Care
Dental Technicians
Dentists
Denture Design
Denture Rebasing
Denture Repair
Denture Retention
Denture, Complete
Denture, Partial, Removable
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Time Factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
The age and maintenance of dentures, and denture-cleaning habits, were studied by an interview survey. The material represented nation-wide the Finnish population aged greater than or equal to 15 years old, and there were 957 interviewees, of whom 328 were denture wearers. In total, 45% of the upper and 40% of the lower dentures were over 10 years old. More than one-third of the dentures more than 5 years old had never been maintained during that time. Individuals whose dentures had been made and fitted by dental technicians visited dentists less frequently than individuals whose dentures had been made by dentists. Over 80% of the denture wearers reported cleaning their dentures by brushing at least once a day, and women cleaned them more frequently than men. The present findings suggest that denture wearers should be a special target group for dental health education, for the development of the latter, and for the development of dental health care services in the future.
PubMed ID
1517873 View in PubMed
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Source
Int Dent J. 1973 Jun;23(2):364-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1973

Are the barriers to good oral hygiene in nursing homes within the nurses or the patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130225
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e748-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Tril Willumsen
Line Karlsen
Richard Naess
Sissel Bjørntvedt
Author Affiliation
Dental Health Services' Competence East (TKØ), Norway. tiril@odont.uio.no
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e748-55
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - classification
Dental Plaque Index
Education, Nursing
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Nurses' Aides - education - psychology
Nursing Homes
Oral Hygiene - education - nursing
Patient compliance
Periodontal Index
Time Factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
To explore nursing home patients' oral hygiene and their nurses' assessments of barriers to improvement.
In nursing homes, nurses are responsible for patients' oral hygiene.
This study assessed the oral hygiene of 358 patients in 11 Norwegian nursing homes. 494 nurses in the same nursing homes participated in a questionnaire study.
More than 40% of patients had unacceptable oral hygiene. 'More than 10 teeth' gave OR = 2, 1 (p = 0.013) and 'resist being helped' OR = 2.5 (p = 0.018) for unacceptable oral hygiene. Eighty percent of the nurses believed knowledge of oral health was important, and 9.1% often considered taking care of patients' teeth unpleasant. Half of the nurses reported lack of time to give regular oral care, and 97% experienced resistant behaviour in patients. Resistant behaviour often left oral care undone. Twenty-one percent of the nurses had considered making legal decisions about use of force or restraints to overcome resistance to teeth cleaning.
Oral hygiene in the nursing homes needed to be improved. Resistant behaviour is a major barrier. To overcome this barrier nurses' education, organisational strategies to provide more time for oral care, and coping with resistant behaviour in patients are important factors.
PubMed ID
22023222 View in PubMed
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Association between smoking intensity and duration and tooth loss among Finnish middle-aged adults: The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273682
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:1141
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Toni Similä
Jorma I Virtanen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:1141
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Dental Care
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Toothbrushing
Abstract
Smoking is a risk factor for oral diseases and tooth loss. Our aim was to analyze the association between smoking intensity and duration and tooth loss among middle-aged Finnish adults who have enjoyed access to subsidized dental care since childhood.
This study was based on the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (NFBC1966) Project, a representative sample of Finnish 46-year-olds. Altogether 1946 46-year-olds participated in a survey and comprehensive clinical oral examinations. We measured smoking exposure in pack-years (intensity) and years of smoking (duration) combined with recent smoking status (current, former, occasional or never). We used negative binomial regression models to estimate the unadjusted and adjusted relative risks (RR) with corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for tooth loss as an outcome. Gender, education, tooth brushing frequency, dental plaque, diabetes and alcohol use served as explanatory variables for the adjusted models.
Smoking intensity associated with tooth loss in an exposure-dependent manner: those with a high number of pack-years had a significantly greater probability of tooth loss than never smokers: 11-20 pack-years (RR?=?1.55, 95 % CI?=?1.15-2.08) and 21 or more pack-years (RR?=?1.78, 95 % CI?=?1.36-2.33). Smoking duration also associated with tooth loss: those who had smoked for several years had a significantly higher probability of tooth loss than never smokers: 21-30 years of smoking (RR?=?1.66, 95 % CI?=?1.29-2.12) and 31 or more years of smoking (RR?=?1.72, 95 % CI?=?1.20-2.45).
We found a clear intensity- and duration-dependent relation between smoking and tooth loss among adults with access to subsidized dental care and in good oral health.
Notes
Cites: Int J Dent Hyg. 2015 Nov;13(4):292-30026294114
Cites: J Clin Periodontol. 2005;32 Suppl 6:180-9516128837
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 2002 Summer;62(3):163-912180044
Cites: Med Princ Pract. 2003;12 Suppl 1:22-3212707498
Cites: Eur J Oral Sci. 2004 Apr;112(2):121-615056108
Cites: Stroke. 2004 Sep;35(9):2029-3515256677
Cites: J Dent Res. 1997 Oct;76(10):1653-99326897
Cites: J Dent Res. 2007 Apr;86(4):373-717384035
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:31317976246
Cites: J Oral Rehabil. 2008 Nov;35(11):827-3518482342
Cites: Stroke. 2008 Dec;39(12):3179-8418832741
Cites: Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2011 Oct;39(5):398-40821241349
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Mar;144(3):252-6523449901
Cites: Quintessence Int. 2013 Apr;44(4):327-3823479583
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e6813223874521
Cites: J Aging Health. 2014 Feb;26(1):54-7124584260
Cites: Geriatr Gerontol Int. 2014 Jul;14(3):526-4024697929
Cites: BMC Oral Health. 2015;15:3425884467
Cites: Int J Dent Hyg. 2016 May;14(2):151-826074207
PubMed ID
26576994 View in PubMed
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Association between soft drink consumption, oral health and some lifestyle factors in Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269469
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1039-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Agneta Hasselkvist
Anders Johansson
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1039-46
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages
Computers
DMF Index
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Meals
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Index
Sex Factors
Snacks
Sports
Sweden
Television
Tooth Erosion - classification
Toothbrushing
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the relationship between soft drink consumption, oral health and some lifestyle factors in Swedish adolescents.
A clinical dental examination and a questionnaire concerning lifestyle factors, including drinking habits, oral hygiene, dietary consumption, physical activity and screen-viewing habits were completed. Three hundred and ninety-two individuals completed the study (13-14 years, n = 195; 18-19 years, n = 197). The material was divided into high and low carbonated soft drink consumption groups, corresponding to approximately the highest and the lowest one-third of subjects in each age group. Differences between the groups were tested by the Mann-Whitney U-test and logistic regression.
Intake of certain dietary items, tooth brushing, sports activities, meal patterns, screen-viewing behaviors, BMI and parents born outside Sweden differed significantly between high and low consumers in one or both of the two age groups. Dental erosion (both age groups) and DMFT/DMFS (18-19 years group) were significantly higher in the high consumption groups. Logistic regression showed predictive variables for high consumption of carbonated soft drinks to be mainly gender (male), unhealthy dietary habits, lesser physical activity, higher BMI and longer time spent in front of TV/computer.
High soft drink consumption was related to poorer oral health and an unhealthier lifestyle.
PubMed ID
25183250 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to and knowledge about oral health care among nursing home personnel--an area in need of improvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130967
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e787-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Inger Wårdh
Margareta Jonsson
Maude Wikström
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Dental Medicine, Huddinge, Sweden. inger.wardh@ki.se
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e787-92
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Dental Hygienists
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Nursing Care
Nursing Homes - manpower
Nursing Staff - education
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - education
Patient care team
Patient compliance
Sweden
Toothbrushing
Abstract
In 1999, a dental reform became law in Sweden that regulated both dental care to dependent individuals and training in oral health care for nursing home personnel. Substantial resources have been channelled into these efforts, but the outcome of these efforts has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes to and knowledge about oral health care among nursing home personnel more than 5 years after the law was adopted, that being 2005.
A total of 454 individuals employed at nursing homes answered a questionnaire of 16 multiple-choice items concerning attitudes to and knowledge about oral health care.
Eighty-nine per cent considered oral health care to be an important part of good nursing. The answers indicated problems, however, when it came to its implementation and knowledge, and 35% stated that they had had no formal education in oral health care.
Despite generally positive oral health care attitudes, it is important that oral health care education is available to and made of interest for all nursing home personnel, especially in light of the increase in number of natural teeth and frequency of crowns and bridges among dependent elderly.
PubMed ID
21950522 View in PubMed
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158 records – page 1 of 16.