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Association between periodontal condition and hypertension in a non-smoking population aged 30-49 years: results of the Health 2000 Survey in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268493
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2014 Dec;41(12):1132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Emilia Ollikainen
Tuomas Saxlin
Tellervo Tervonen
Anna Liisa Suominen
Matti Knuuttila
Antti Jula
Pekka Ylöstalo
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2014 Dec;41(12):1132-8
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Diabetes mellitus
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Smoking
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether periodontal condition is associated with hypertension and systolic blood pressure.
The study population consisted of dentate, non-diabetic, non-smoking individuals aged 30-49 years (n = 1296) in the national Health 2000 Survey in Finland. The number of teeth with deepened (=4 mm) and deep (=6 mm) periodontal pockets and the number of sextants with gingival bleeding were used as explanatory variables. Hypertension and systolic blood pressure were used as outcome variables.
There was no consistent association between the number of teeth with deepened (=4 mm) (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.95-1.01) or deep (=6 mm) (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.90-1.12) periodontal pockets and hypertension after adjusting for confounding factors. Nor was there any essential association between the number of bleeding sextants and hypertension.
Periodontal pocketing and gingival bleeding did not appear to be related to hypertension in non-diabetic, non-smoking individuals aged 30-49 years. Further studies using experimental study designs would be required to determine the role of infectious periodontal diseases in the development or progression of hypertension.
PubMed ID
25256004 View in PubMed
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Association between smoking intensity and duration and tooth loss among Finnish middle-aged adults: The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273682
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:1141
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Toni Similä
Jorma I Virtanen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:1141
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Dental Care
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Toothbrushing
Abstract
Smoking is a risk factor for oral diseases and tooth loss. Our aim was to analyze the association between smoking intensity and duration and tooth loss among middle-aged Finnish adults who have enjoyed access to subsidized dental care since childhood.
This study was based on the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (NFBC1966) Project, a representative sample of Finnish 46-year-olds. Altogether 1946 46-year-olds participated in a survey and comprehensive clinical oral examinations. We measured smoking exposure in pack-years (intensity) and years of smoking (duration) combined with recent smoking status (current, former, occasional or never). We used negative binomial regression models to estimate the unadjusted and adjusted relative risks (RR) with corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for tooth loss as an outcome. Gender, education, tooth brushing frequency, dental plaque, diabetes and alcohol use served as explanatory variables for the adjusted models.
Smoking intensity associated with tooth loss in an exposure-dependent manner: those with a high number of pack-years had a significantly greater probability of tooth loss than never smokers: 11-20 pack-years (RR?=?1.55, 95 % CI?=?1.15-2.08) and 21 or more pack-years (RR?=?1.78, 95 % CI?=?1.36-2.33). Smoking duration also associated with tooth loss: those who had smoked for several years had a significantly higher probability of tooth loss than never smokers: 21-30 years of smoking (RR?=?1.66, 95 % CI?=?1.29-2.12) and 31 or more years of smoking (RR?=?1.72, 95 % CI?=?1.20-2.45).
We found a clear intensity- and duration-dependent relation between smoking and tooth loss among adults with access to subsidized dental care and in good oral health.
Notes
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Cites: BMC Oral Health. 2015;15:3425884467
Cites: Int J Dent Hyg. 2016 May;14(2):151-826074207
PubMed ID
26576994 View in PubMed
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Association of lifestyle with periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11391
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1995 Jun;23(3):155-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
T K Sakki
M L Knuuttila
S S Vimpari
M S Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Geriatric Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1995 Jun;23(3):155-8
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dental Care - utilization
Diet
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Toothbrushing - utilization
Abstract
All the 1012, 55-yr-old citizens of Oulu (a medium-sized Finnish town) were invited to a clinical examination, and 780 of them participated. The associations of lifestyle with periodontal health were analyzed in the 527 dentate subjects. Periodontal pockets deeper than 3 mm were recorded as a percentage of the surfaces at risk. Lifestyle was measured by questions about dietary habits, smoking habits, alcohol consumption and physical activity. Lifestyle had an independent association with periodontal health. Periodontal pocketing increased with an unhealthier lifestyle. Lifestyle could explain some of the social and sex differences in periodontal health.
PubMed ID
7634770 View in PubMed
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Association of smoking and snuffing with dental caries occurrence in a young male population in Finland: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269471
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1017-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Tarja Tanner
Antti Kämppi
Jari Päkkilä
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Pertti Patinen
Leo Tjäderhane
Vuokko Anttonen
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1017-24
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Energy Drinks - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Oral Health
Prevalence
Smoking - epidemiology
Snacks
Tobacco Use - epidemiology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of smoking and snuffing habits in association with dental caries occurrence in a male cohort born in the early 1990s in Finland. The impact of health behaviours and factors related to the place of residence were included in analyses.
Oral health of 8537 conscripts was screened in a cross-sectional study. In the same occasion they also answered a questionnaire covering their smoking and snuffing habits and other background factors. The residence-related factors were obtained from the Defence Forces' database. Cross-tabulation together with chi-squared test and generalized linear mixed models were used for analyses.
Almost forty per cent (39.4%) of the men reported smoking daily and 9.0% reported daily snuffing. Restorative treatment need of those who reported frequent smoking was more than 2-fold (mean DT = 2.22) compared to the non-smokers (mean DT = 1.07). Smoking was statistically significantly associated with other harmful health behaviours. The snuffers reported more snacking than the non-smokers, but were most frequent brushers. The result from the statistical modelling showed that smoking, low tooth brushing frequency, eating sweets and consuming energy drinks frequently were significantly associated with restorative treatment need.
In this cross-sectional study, association between smoking and dental caries was distinct. The high rate of restorative treatment need among smokers may be explained by their poor health behaviours. Dietary habits of the snuffers seem harmful too, but are compensated by good tooth brushing frequency.
PubMed ID
25141188 View in PubMed
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Background factors affecting dental caries in permanent teeth of Finnish and Soviet children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224747
Source
ASDC J Dent Child. 1992 Jan-Feb;59(1):28-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Honkala
S. Kolmakow
V. Nyyssönen
E. Kuzmina
S. Vasina
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dentistry and Cariology, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
ASDC J Dent Child. 1992 Jan-Feb;59(1):28-33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Beverages
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Education
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Moscow - epidemiology
Mothers
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Russia - epidemiology
Toothbrushing
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze the association between some general background factors and caries experience in two groups of Finnish children (from Helsinki and Kuopio) and Soviet children (Moscow and Leningrad). A total of 1187 schoolchildren, ages seven, nine and twelve years, were examined and information about their health habits was gathered by questionnaire. Questions included use of sweets, cakes, soft drinks, sugar-sweetened coffee and tea, toothbrushing frequency and mother's education. Except for age, the factors that explain caries experience clearly differ in Finnish and Soviet children.
PubMed ID
1531661 View in PubMed
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Background factors of enamel focal demineralization in groups of Finnish and Russian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227278
Source
J Clin Pediatr Dent. 1991;15(3):174-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
V. Nyyssonen
E. Honkala
E V Borovsky
T A Smirnova
Author Affiliation
Department of Community dentistry, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pediatr Dent. 1991;15(3):174-8
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Dental Caries - epidemiology - etiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Dietary Carbohydrates - adverse effects
Educational Status
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Questionnaires
Toothbrushing
USSR - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze the occurrence of EFD lesions in relation to some background factors in Finnish and Soviet children. Children aged 7, 9 and 12 years (n = 1187) were examined clinically in Helsinki, Kuopio (Finland), Moscow and Leningrad (USSR). A questionnaire sent to the parents was used to collect data on toothbrushing frequency, use of sweets, cakes, soft drinks, sugar-sweetened tea/coffee and mother's education. In addition to bivariate analysis, log-linear regression models were used for comparing the simultaneous association in two ethnic groups. In general, the Finnish children had more EFD lesions than the Soviet children did. Among the Finns no consistent associations were found between the number of EFD lesions and the use of different sugar products or differences in toothbrushing habits. The number of EFD lesions decreased consistently according to mother's education with the Finnish children, but not with the Soviet children. The final multivariate model for Finnish children included age, toothbrushing frequency, place of residence (Kuopio) and use of soft drinks. The respective model for the Soviet children included age and place of residence (Leningrad). Evidently, the demineralization process or tooth resistance differs in these two ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
1878328 View in PubMed
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Chewing of xylitol gum--a well adopted practice among finnish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213339
Source
Caries Res. 1996;30(1):34-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
E. Honkala
A. Rimpelä
S. Karvonen
M. Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dentistry and Cariology, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Caries Res. 1996;30(1):34-9
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Attitude to Health
Cariostatic Agents - adverse effects
Chewing Gum - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Preventive Dentistry
Social Class
Sucrose - adverse effects
Toothbrushing
Urban health
Xylitol - adverse effects
Abstract
The adoption of xylitol chewing gum in Finland was studied using data from two comparable postal surveys for national samples of 12- to 18-year-olds in 1977 (response rate 79%, n = 2,528) and 1991 (77%, n = 7,672). In 1977 only 12% of this age group used xylitol chewing gum but, by 1991 it had become common (64% of boys, 81% of girls). Daily use increased from 1 to 15% among boys and from 1 to 32% among girls. Use of sucrose chewing gum decreased; in 1991 only 2% used it daily. Daily use of xylitol chewing gum did not vary according to socioeconomic status or level of urbanization. The increase in use of xylitol chewing gum is an example of the positive effect of health education given by a comprehensive, preventively oriented system of dental health care in association with commercial interests.
PubMed ID
8850581 View in PubMed
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Dental erosion and associated factors among factory workers exposed to inorganic acid fumes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227625
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1991;87(3):359-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
M. Tuominen
R. Tuominen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1991;87(3):359-64
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acids - adverse effects - analysis
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Beverages
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Smoking - epidemiology
Sucrose - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Tooth Erosion - epidemiology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The occurrence of dental erosion and the relative importance of some related factors were explored in a cross-sectional study, using blind dental examinations. A sample of 186 workers from four factories was drawn. Among the 157 dentate participants 76 were working in departments containing acid fumes and 81 controls had never worked under such conditions. Out of the dentate participants, 20 (12.7% had erosion). Anterior teeth were affected more often than posterior ones. Exposure to acid fumes, increasing age and frequency of intake of fruits increased the probability of dental erosion. It can be concluded that exposure to acid fumes in the work environment is associated with dental erosion especially on anterior teeth.
PubMed ID
1749782 View in PubMed
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Dental fear and oral health and family characteristics of Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30063
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2004 Aug;62(4):207-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Kari Rantavuori
Satu Lahti
Hannu Hausen
Liisa Seppä
Sakari Kärkkäinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2004 Aug;62(4):207-13
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Candy
Child
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Diet, Cariogenic
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Toothbrushing - utilization
Abstract
Objectives: Our aim was to describe the occurrence of dental fear among Finnish children of different ages and to ascertain how oral health and family characteristics are associated with dental fear. Methods: The subject groups were aged 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 years in two middle-sized cities, and the 1474 participants were distributed over fairly equal samples of each age. A questionnaire given to each child to be filled out at home enquired about social background, oral hygiene habits, diet, and dental fear. Oral health status was examined clinically and radiographically by two calibrated dentists. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed for each age group in order to study the associations between dental fear and selected factors. Results: Dental fear was higher among 12- and 15-year-old children than among the younger ones. Pain, drilling, and local anesthesia were reported to be the most frightening aspects. Excluding the 12-year-olds, children whose family members reported dental fear were more likely to report dental fear than children whose family members did not report dental fear. Six- and 12-year-olds who had experienced caries were more likely to report dental fear than were caries-free children. Among 6-year-olds, father's education modified the effect of a child's caries experience on child dental fear. Frequent intake of sugary items and a limit on eating candies to only one day per week were associated with higher dental fear. Conclusions: Fear of dental treatment is still fairly common among Finnish children, and the factors associated with it differ with the age of the child.
PubMed ID
15513417 View in PubMed
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Dental health and dental treatment needs among recruits of the Finnish Defence Forces, 1919-91.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208290
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1997 Jun;55(3):192-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
O. Ankkuriniemi
J. Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1997 Jun;55(3):192-7
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Calculus - epidemiology
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Plaque - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Physical Examination
Social Class
Tooth Diseases - epidemiology
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Toothache - epidemiology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The first two surveys of the dental health of young Finnish men were conducted in 1919 and 1965. The objective of four subsequent surveys (1976, 1981, 1986, and 1991) was to collect both interview and clinical examination data for the monitoring of changes in the oral health status of the recruits. A significant reduction in self-reported toothache, gingival bleeding, and number of decayed teeth was observed from 1976 to 1991. At examination, the numbers of decayed teeth, teeth indicated for extraction, teeth in need of fillings, and missing teeth decreased substantially, as did the teeth with visible plaque, subgingival calculus, and teeth with 4-mm or deeper periodontal pockets. This comprehensive series of successive cross-sectional oral health surveys clearly shows that since 1976 a significant decrease in oral disease and treatment needs has taken place among the Finnish population of young men.
PubMed ID
9226431 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.