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Are the barriers to good oral hygiene in nursing homes within the nurses or the patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130225
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e748-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Tril Willumsen
Line Karlsen
Richard Naess
Sissel Bjørntvedt
Author Affiliation
Dental Health Services' Competence East (TKØ), Norway. tiril@odont.uio.no
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e748-55
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - classification
Dental Plaque Index
Education, Nursing
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Nurses' Aides - education - psychology
Nursing Homes
Oral Hygiene - education - nursing
Patient compliance
Periodontal Index
Time Factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
To explore nursing home patients' oral hygiene and their nurses' assessments of barriers to improvement.
In nursing homes, nurses are responsible for patients' oral hygiene.
This study assessed the oral hygiene of 358 patients in 11 Norwegian nursing homes. 494 nurses in the same nursing homes participated in a questionnaire study.
More than 40% of patients had unacceptable oral hygiene. 'More than 10 teeth' gave OR = 2, 1 (p = 0.013) and 'resist being helped' OR = 2.5 (p = 0.018) for unacceptable oral hygiene. Eighty percent of the nurses believed knowledge of oral health was important, and 9.1% often considered taking care of patients' teeth unpleasant. Half of the nurses reported lack of time to give regular oral care, and 97% experienced resistant behaviour in patients. Resistant behaviour often left oral care undone. Twenty-one percent of the nurses had considered making legal decisions about use of force or restraints to overcome resistance to teeth cleaning.
Oral hygiene in the nursing homes needed to be improved. Resistant behaviour is a major barrier. To overcome this barrier nurses' education, organisational strategies to provide more time for oral care, and coping with resistant behaviour in patients are important factors.
PubMed ID
22023222 View in PubMed
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Association of smoking and snuffing with dental caries occurrence in a young male population in Finland: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269471
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1017-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Tarja Tanner
Antti Kämppi
Jari Päkkilä
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Pertti Patinen
Leo Tjäderhane
Vuokko Anttonen
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1017-24
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Energy Drinks - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Oral Health
Prevalence
Smoking - epidemiology
Snacks
Tobacco Use - epidemiology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of smoking and snuffing habits in association with dental caries occurrence in a male cohort born in the early 1990s in Finland. The impact of health behaviours and factors related to the place of residence were included in analyses.
Oral health of 8537 conscripts was screened in a cross-sectional study. In the same occasion they also answered a questionnaire covering their smoking and snuffing habits and other background factors. The residence-related factors were obtained from the Defence Forces' database. Cross-tabulation together with chi-squared test and generalized linear mixed models were used for analyses.
Almost forty per cent (39.4%) of the men reported smoking daily and 9.0% reported daily snuffing. Restorative treatment need of those who reported frequent smoking was more than 2-fold (mean DT = 2.22) compared to the non-smokers (mean DT = 1.07). Smoking was statistically significantly associated with other harmful health behaviours. The snuffers reported more snacking than the non-smokers, but were most frequent brushers. The result from the statistical modelling showed that smoking, low tooth brushing frequency, eating sweets and consuming energy drinks frequently were significantly associated with restorative treatment need.
In this cross-sectional study, association between smoking and dental caries was distinct. The high rate of restorative treatment need among smokers may be explained by their poor health behaviours. Dietary habits of the snuffers seem harmful too, but are compensated by good tooth brushing frequency.
PubMed ID
25141188 View in PubMed
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Associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and periodontal pocketing and gingival bleeding: results of a study in a non-smoking population in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277832
Source
J Periodontol. 2015 Jun;86(6):755-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Georgios N Antonoglou
Anna Liisa Suominen
Matti Knuuttila
Pekka Ylöstalo
Meeri Ojala
Satu Männistö
Jukka Marniemi
Annamari Lundqvist
Tellervo Tervonen
Source
J Periodontol. 2015 Jun;86(6):755-65
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Plaque Index
Dietary Supplements
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Gingival Hemorrhage - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Pocket - blood
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamins - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Apart from the effects of vitamin D on bone metabolism, it is also known for its immunomodulatory properties. However, so far, it is not clear whether serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] exerts any beneficial effect on the periodontium. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether the serum level of 25(OH)D is related to periodontal condition, measured by means of pocketing and gingival bleeding.
This cross-sectional study is based on a non-smoking subpopulation without diabetes of the Finnish Health 2000 Survey (N = 1,262). Periodontal condition was measured as the number of teeth with deep (=4 mm) periodontal pockets and the number of bleeding sextants per individual. Serum 25(OH)D level was determined by means of a standard laboratory measurement. Prevalence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Poisson regression models.
There were practically no associations between serum 25(OH)D level and teeth with deep (=4 mm) periodontal pockets or bleeding sextants. A somewhat lower proportion of teeth with deep periodontal pockets was found in higher serum 25(OH)D quintiles among individuals with a good oral hygiene level.
Serum 25(OH)D did not seem to be related to periodontal condition, measured as periodontal pocketing and gingival bleeding in this low-risk, low-25(OH)D status population.
PubMed ID
25762358 View in PubMed
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Associations of instrumental activities of daily living and handgrip strength with oral self-care among home-dwelling elderly 75+.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128053
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kaija Komulainen
Pekka Ylöstalo
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Piia Ruoppi
Matti Knuuttila
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. kaija.komulainen@uef.fi
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque Index
Dentition
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpastes - therapeutic use
Xerostomia - classification
Abstract
To study the associations of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and the handgrip strength with oral self-care among dentate home-dwelling elderly people in Finland.
The study analysed data for 168 dentate participants (mean age 80.6 years) in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study. Each participant received a clinical oral examination and structured interview in 2004-2005. Functional status was assessed using the IADL scale and handgrip strength was measured using handheld dynamometry.
Study participants with high IADL (scores 7-8) had odds ratios (ORs) for brushing their teeth at least twice a day of 2.7 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-6.8], for using toothpaste at least twice a day of 2.0 (CI 0.8-5.2) and for having good oral hygiene of 2.8 (CI 1.0-8.3) when compared with participants with low IADL (scores =6). Participants in the upper tertiles of the handgrip strength had ORs for brushing the teeth at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.9), for using the toothpaste at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.8) and for good oral hygiene of 1.1 (CI 0.5-2.4) in comparison with the study subjects in the lowest tertile of handgrip strength.
The results of this study suggest that the functional status, measured by means of the IADL scale, but not handgrip strength, is an important determinant of oral self-care among the home-dwelling elderly.
PubMed ID
22239745 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to and experience of dental care among 50-year-olds in two Swedish counties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62826
Source
Swed Dent J. 1999;23(2-3):87-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
L. Unell
B. Söderfeldt
A. Halling
D. Birkhed
Author Affiliation
Community Dental Health Unit, Orebro County Council, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1999;23(2-3):87-96
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - economics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Health Behavior
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient satisfaction
Plants, Toxic
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Tobacco, Smokeless
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpaste - therapeutic use
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate attitudes to and experiences of dental care in a population, born 1942. The following items were studied: opinions of general and oral health, attitudes to and experiences of dental care, dental care habits, experiences of latest visit to a dentist, tobacco habits and use of various dental hygiene articles. A cross-sectional mail questionnaire was sent in 1992 to all 50-year-olds in two Swedish counties, Orebro and Ostergotland, totally 8888 persons; the response rate was 71%. Of the population 89%, indicated good health. Satisfaction with dental care was high, 94%. 26% stated attendance to a dentist twice or more per year, and 64% at least once a year. As to expenses, 78% paid less than 1000 SEK the last year. Concerning the latest visit, 38% reported painless treatment, 37% no inconvenience, and 55% good care. The duration of the latest visit included on an average 27 min in travel time, 7 min in waiting time and 27 min in treatment time. Information about oral hygiene was given to 29% and about cost for treatment to 47% of the interviewed. There were 28% daily smokers. Snuff was daily used by 10% of the males. Toothbrushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste seemed to be the standard oral hygiene procedure and was reported by 80% of the respondents.
PubMed ID
10431344 View in PubMed
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Buccal attachment loss in Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69092
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1992 Aug;19(7):485-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
C. Källestål
S. Uhlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1992 Aug;19(7):485-91
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Calculus - epidemiology
Dental Plaque - epidemiology
Gingiva - pathology
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Gingival Recession - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Labial Frenum - pathology
Logistic Models
Malocclusion - epidemiology
Plants, Toxic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco, Smokeless
Toothbrushing - methods
Abstract
A case referent study was performed to identify factors connected with loss of buccal attachment in adolescents. The study group was identified among 18-year-olds who had participated 2 years earlier in a study of periodontal conditions in adolescents. The criterion for inclusion in the case group was buccal attachment loss (greater than or equal to 1 mm) in one or more sites. Information on 28 variables, identified earlier as being related to recessions, was collected in a clinical examination, interview and observation. The referent group consisted of 66 subjects and the case group of 71 subjects. The case group comprised 2 subgroups, one identified as having buccal attachment loss in 1987 and the other with attachment loss occurring in the years 1987-89. Statistical analyses, using the chi 2 test, logistic regression and a variance component model, were performed to detect factors related to buccal attachment loss. These factors were thin alveolar tissue, narrow width of the attached gingiva and presence of teeth with buccal displacement. The results indicate that the anatomy of the buccal alveolar process is related to the presence of buccal attachment loss in populations with a high level of oral hygiene. To evaluate the importance of possible risk factors or etiological factors for development of buccal loss of tooth support, prospective epidemiological or experimental studies are needed.
PubMed ID
1430284 View in PubMed
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Caries decline before fluoride toothpaste was available: earlier and greater decline in the rural north than in southwestern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32235
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Feb;59(1):7-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
J M Birkeland
O. Haugejorden
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology-Cariology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway. jan.birkeland@odont.uib.no
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Feb;59(1):7-13
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Cariostatic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentists
Educational Status
Fluorides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Mouthwashes - therapeutic use
Norway - epidemiology
Population
Preventive Dentistry
Regression Analysis
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
School Dentistry
Socioeconomic Factors
Tablets
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Toothbrushing
Toothpaste - therapeutic use
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors related to caries in 6-17-year-olds in 2 groups of Norwegian counties between 1966 and 1983. The average number of surfaces filled and permanent teeth extracted due to caries declined in the 4 northern counties from 1967. An increase was recorded in the 7 southwestern counties until 1971, then a decline. In the 1960s significantly more surfaces were filled and teeth extracted in the north compared to the southwest. Based on intra-county comparisons, the decline in surfaces treated was greater in the north between 1967 and 1983; 5.4 +/- 0.4 vs 3.7 +/- 0.7, P
PubMed ID
11318045 View in PubMed
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Caries experience and background factors in 4-year-old children: time trends 1967-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30526
Source
Caries Res. 2004 Mar-Apr;38(2):149-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Stecksén-Blicks
K. Sunnegårdh
E. Borssén
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Paediatric Dentistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. christina.stecksen.blicks@vll.se
Source
Caries Res. 2004 Mar-Apr;38(2):149-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Humans
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth, Deciduous - pathology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In cross-sectional studies conducted in 1967, 1971, 1976, 1980, 1987, 1992, 1997 and 2002, 4-year-old children in Umeå, a city in northern Sweden, were examined for dental caries and background factors such as oral hygiene habits, use of fluorides, and sugar consumption. The same methods and criteria have been used in each of the studies from 1967 to 2002. The number of children with caries had declined from 87% in 1967 to 42% in 1987, but then the decline levelled out. In 2002, 46% of the children had caries with a mean dmfs value of 2.0 +/- 3.6. Six percent of the children had 10 or more dmfs. Immigrant children had a higher caries prevalence (p
PubMed ID
14767172 View in PubMed
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Dental anxiety, concomitant factors and change in prevalence over 50 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275900
Source
Community Dent Health. 2016 Jun;33(2):121-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
L. Svensson
M. Hakeberg
U Wide Boman
Source
Community Dent Health. 2016 Jun;33(2):121-6
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Devices, Home Care - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Exercise
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Self Report
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To analyse the prevalence of Dental Anxiety (DA) in the general adult population of Sweden, to study concomitant factors of DA and also to compare the prevalence of DA in 1962 with that in 2013.
The national study for 2013 included 3,500 individuals, randomly selected from the Swedish population. The data sampling was performed as a telephone survey including 38 questions and this report is a selection of those questions with the focus on DA. The national study from 1962 was a face-to-face survey of 1,331 individuals randomly selected from the Swedish population. Both surveys were conducted by the same company.
In 2013, severe DA was reported in 4.7%, moderate DA in 4.5%, low DA in 9.8% and no DA in 80.9% of the subjects. Most (72.9%) of the subjects who reported severe DA attended dental care regularly. Important predictive factors of DA were age, gender, education, and self-rated poor oral and general health. The analysis showed a decrease in the prevalence of DA between 1962 and 2013, specifically a change towards more individuals reporting no dental anxiety (38.5% vs. 80.9%) but also smaller proportions of individuals having low and high DA (46.4% vs 9.8% and 15.1% vs 9.2%, respectively).
In this national representative sample of Swedish adults the prevalence of severe DA was 4.7%. The main finding revealed a significant decrease of the prevalence of DA over 50 years.
PubMed ID
27352466 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.