Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Behavioural and demographic factors during early childhood and poor dental health at 10 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175959
Source
Caries Res. 2005 Mar-Apr;39(2):85-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
M-L Mattila
P. Rautava
M. Aromaa
A. Ojanlatva
P. Paunio
L. Hyssälä
H. Helenius
M. Sillanpää
Author Affiliation
Public Health Centre, Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. malema@utu.fi
Source
Caries Res. 2005 Mar-Apr;39(2):85-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Child Behavior
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - complications - prevention & control
Dental Plaque - complications
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Fathers
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Mothers - education
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
The aim was to elucidate whether variables recorded in early childhood would have a long-lasting predictive value of poor dental health at the age of 10 years in a prospectively followed Finnish population-based cohort setting. The second aim was to find new tools for preventive work in order to improve dental health among children. Poor dental health (dmft + DMFT >or= 5) at 10 years of age was associated with child's nocturnal juice drinking at 18 months. It was associated with the following factors at age 3 years: frequent consumption of sweets; infrequent tooth brushing; plaque and caries on teeth. Of family factors, the following were significant: father's young age at birth of the child; mother's basic 9-year education; mother's caries (i.e. several carious teeth per year), and father's infrequent tooth brushing. Early childhood risk factors of poor dental health seem to be stable even after 10 years of life and the changing of teeth from primary to permanent ones. In preventive work, dental health care staff could offer support to those parents with risk factors in their child rearing tasks.
PubMed ID
15741719 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in dental health and dental health habits from 3 to 5 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201649
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1998;58(4):270-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
M L Mattila
P. Paunio
P. Rautava
A. Ojanlatva
M. Sillanpää
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1998;58(4):270-4
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - pathology - prevention & control
Dental Caries Susceptibility
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dental Plaque Index
Dentin - pathology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Health Education, Dental
Health status
Humans
Male
Mothers - education
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Risk factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
This study sought to determine how dental health and dental health habits change from 3 to 5 years of age and to consider whether preventive dental health care helped in preventing or halting caries in children.
The study included 67 maternity health care clinics, 72 well-baby clinics, and 69 dental health care clinics. Of the 1,292 newborn children, 1,003 (90.8%) were included in this study.
Preventive dental health care contributed to dental caries being halted in only 13.2 percent of those children who had enamel caries at 3 years of age. The dmft index did not increase in 22.6 percent of those children who had dentinal caries at 3 years of age. For all others, the disease became more severe. Toothbrushing habits of 3-year-old children were very consistent over the two years studied. Children were at a risk for caries when their mothers had nine years of basic education, when they already had plaque and caries at 3 years of age, and when the frequency of eating sweets increased the most during the two-year study period.
Among 3-year-old children, plaque is an indicator of caries risk and therefore should be a key element in health education. Those children who already have evidence of caries at 3 years of age should be the target of preventive dental services because of their increased risk.
PubMed ID
10390708 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dental health habits of 3-year-old Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221788
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1993 Feb;21(1):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
P. Paunio
P. Rautava
M. Sillanpää
O. Kaleva
Author Affiliation
Public Health Center, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1993 Feb;21(1):4-7
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Bottle Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fluorides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - education
Oral Hygiene
Socioeconomic Factors
Sucrose - administration & dosage
Toothbrushing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim was to study whether 3-yr-old children's toothbrushing habits are associated with the child's other dental health habits and whether the mother's background influences the child's toothbrushing frequency. The survey used stratified randomized cluster sampling, confidential questionnaires and clinical dental examinations. A random sample of 1443 (91.2%) of a Finnish province's 1582 primiparous women participated in the study at the onset of their pregnancy. Dental health care clinics of the public health care system carried out dental examinations in 1018 (83.5%) 3-yr-old children born of these pregnancies. The variables used in the study included consumption of juice at night and sugar at the age of 1.5 yr and the use of fluoride tablets and sweets at the age of 3. The mother's background factors included age, basic education and occupation. Daily toothbrushing was practised by 78.2% of the children. Addition of sugar to the diet and frequent use of sweets at the age 3 were more common in those who brushed their teeth only occasionally, whereas the use of fluoride tablets was less frequent in them than in those brushing their teeth every day. Of the mothers' background factors, age was the most significant. The youngest mothers paid the least attention to their children's toothbrushing habits. The proportion of those brushing their teeth was 67.9% in rural areas, 78.6% in semi-urban population centers and 80.1% in towns (P = 0.02). The results indicate that the health education provided by dental health care clinics should be focussed on young mothers and rural families.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8432104 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Finnish family competence study: dental oral self-care behaviour and awareness of gingivitis/calculus in fathers of young families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37416
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1991;87(3):365-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
L. Hyssälä
K. Oikarinen
P. Rautava
P. Paunio
M. Sillanpää
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1991;87(3):365-71
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Dental Calculus - epidemiology
Dental Devices, Home Care
Education
Family Health
Fathers
Finland - epidemiology
Gingivitis - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Oral Health
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Self Care
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine oral self-care behaviour and the prevalence of gingivitis and dental calculus in fathers of young families using a questionnaire. The participation rate at 18 months after the birth of the first child was 73.1%. The mean age of the respondents (n = 917) was 28.1 years (range 17-49; SD 4.6). Dental health and dental care were assessed by asking about the existence of gingivitis and dental calculus. Oral hygiene habits were analysed by asking about the use of toothpicks and dental floss and the regularity of toothbrushing. Gingivitis and dental calculus were found to be related to age and to educational and occupational status. The older respondents used dental floss and toothpicks more often and brushed their teeth more regularly than those in the younger age group. When the wife's knowledge was poor, the respondent's oral hygiene habits were also poor. If the wife's knowledge level was good, the young father's oral hygiene was good, too. Parents transfer their own oral health care habits to their children. Respondents whose parents had a high socio-economic status exhibited good oral hygiene habits. The Maternity Health Care Clinic and Well-Baby Clinic network can also influence oral health care habits. The relevant parts of general prophylactic guidance given at these clinics should be included in dental health programmes.
PubMed ID
1749783 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Finnish Family Competence Study: the effects of living conditions on sucking habits in 3-year-old Finnish children and the association between these habits and dental occlusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221737
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1993 Feb;51(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
P. Paunio
P. Rautava
M. Sillanpää
Author Affiliation
Public Health Centre, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1993 Feb;51(1):23-9
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Airway Obstruction - etiology
Breast Feeding
Child care
Child, Preschool
Family
Family Health
Female
Fingersucking - adverse effects - psychology
Finland
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Male
Malocclusion - etiology
Maternal Age
Social Class
Social Environment
Toothbrushing
Abstract
Sucking habits and their connection with family background was investigated in 3-year-old Finnish children. The association between sucking habits and malocclusion was also studied. The study was based on a survey with stratified randomized cluster sampling, confidential questionnaires, and clinical dental examinations. Dummy (pacifier) use was often associated with a negligent attitude towards the child's toothbrushing. This may imply that these parents need more support, encouragement, and counseling from the well-baby clinic than others. Sucking habits were strongly associated with malocclusion.
PubMed ID
8451920 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Finnish Family Competence Study: the relationship between caries, dental health habits and general health in 3-year-old Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222211
Source
Caries Res. 1993;27(2):154-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
P. Paunio
P. Rautava
H. Helenius
P. Alanen
M. Sillanpää
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Caries Res. 1993;27(2):154-60
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Beverages
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Disease
Family Health
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fluorides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Health
Humans
Infant
Male
Oral Health
Sucrose - administration & dosage
Tablets
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine how dental health related habits, infectious diseases and long-term illness are associated with dental health at the age of 3 in first-born children resident in a Finnish province. The study was designed as a survey using stratified randomised cluster sampling, confidential questionnaires and clinical dental examinations. The results were analysed using polytomous logistic models. In the stepwise analysis the only statistically significant explanatory factors were the use of juice at night and dental cleanliness. Antibiotic treatment or long-term illness was not significantly associated with dental health.
PubMed ID
8319260 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of dental health care on dental health of children with long-term diseases: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193690
Source
J Clin Dent. 2001;12(3):77-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
M L Mattila
P. Rautava
P. Paunio
L. Hyssälä
H. Helenius
M. Sillanpää
A. Ojanlatva
Author Affiliation
Dental Health Care Clinic and Public Health Center of Turku, Department of Public Health University of Turku, Finland. malema@utu.fi
Source
J Clin Dent. 2001;12(3):77-82
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child
Consumer Satisfaction
DMF Index
Dental Care for Chronically Ill
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Diet
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Malocclusion - epidemiology
Marital status
Maternal-Child Health Centers - utilization
Oral Health
Parents
Questionnaires
Statistics, nonparametric
Toothbrushing - utilization
Abstract
The objective was to study dental health among nine-year-old long-term ill and disabled children and their matched controls using DMFT/dmft-indices (decayed-missing-filled-teeth, of both permanent and deciduous teeth); to analyze similarities and differences of their family factors; the children's dental health habits which include dietary factors; to assess capabilities of the health care personnel in the identification of the risk groups and in the provision of services; and finally to investigate family satisfaction with the dental health care services provided. One dentist (M-L M) routinely carried out the clinical examinations of the children using the DMFT(dmft)-index. Only cavities extending to dentin were included in the DMF and dmf indices. X-rays were also used. It was found that less than half of the children (46%) had healthy teeth (DMFT and dmft both = 0), with 41% among the study group and 51% among the controls. The DMFS index of the longterm ill children was slightly, but not significantly greater than that of the controls, and these children used dental health care services more but their families were less satisfied with the services. The long-term ill children had less orthodontic care than the controls although they needed it more frequently, and they had a designated candy day significantly more often than the controls. Special diets were associated with long-term ill children, as were the sociodemographic factors of marital status, divorce, or stepfather present. No significant differences existed between the groups in toothbrushing and the use of fluoride products. In the status and health of teeth as measured with the DMFT/dmft indices, there were no statistically significant differences between the group of the long-term-ill children and healthy controls. Estimation of the focusing of care was considered successful concerning dental health, but resource limitations emerged and contributed to parents not being satisfied with the frequency dental care services offered.
PubMed ID
11505965 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.