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Dental health habits in Austria, England, Finland and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38477
Source
Int Dent J. 1988 Jun;38(2):131-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988
Author
E. Honkala
L. Kannas
M. Rimpela
B. Wold
L E Aaro
P. Gilles
Source
Int Dent J. 1988 Jun;38(2):131-8
Date
Jun-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Austria
Child
Diet, Cariogenic
England
Female
Finland
Fluorides
Humans
Male
Norway
Oral Hygiene
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Toothbrushing
Abstract
Individually, people can prevent dental caries by sugar restriction and periodontal disease by toothbrushing. The aim of this study was to determine the toothbrushing frequency and consumption of sweets and soft drinks in some European countries. The data were obtained during the winter of 1983-84 from schoolchildren aged 11.5, 13.5 and 15.5 in Austria, England, Finland and Norway. Except for England, the samples were nationally representative. The questionnaires were completed at school. Dental health habits apparently were best in Norway, as the toothbrushing frequency was highest and the consumption of sweets and soft drinks was lowest. The toothbrushing frequency of boys was lowest in Finland. The consumption of sweets and soft drinks was very high in Austria and England. Such international comparisons should be used when evaluating and directing national programmes of preventive dentistry.
PubMed ID
3165965 View in PubMed
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Determinants of dental health behaviors in Nordic schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37257
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1991 Feb;19(1):14-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1991
Author
J. Rise
B. Wold
L E Aarö
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1991 Feb;19(1):14-9
Date
Feb-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Carbonated Beverages
Child
Comparative Study
Dental Devices, Home Care
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Education
Female
Finland
Fluorides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mouthwashes
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - instrumentation
Sweden
Tablets
Toothbrushing
Toothpaste
Abstract
As part of the comprehensive study "Health Behavior in Schoolchildren. A WHO Cross National Survey", this paper set out to identify determinants of four dental health behavioral dimensions in Finnish, Norwegian, and Swedish schoolchildren aged 11, 13, and 15. The data were collected by means of self-administered questionnaires, and the results are considered to be representative of each country. The total sample size approximated 3000 pupils in each country. The four dependent variables, fluoride, interdental cleaning, sugar, and brushing behavior, were all based upon sum-scores of several questions, and were subsequently regressed upon five predictors: school achievement, sex, time spent with friends, educational plans, and family meal pattern. This model provided a far better fit to the data on sugar and brushing behavior than to fluoride and interdental cleaning behavior. However, brushing seems to be different from sugar behavior, being influenced by different factors. While brushing is closely linked to the prevailing sex-role pattern, sugar behavior is stronger related to peer group norms. Thus, the symbolic function of sweet consumption of the youth culture should have implications for the design of intervention strategies. For example, the provision of alternative behaviors will only be successful if the behaviors serve the same function as sugar consumption.
PubMed ID
2019083 View in PubMed
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Distribution of dental health behaviors in Nordic schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37255
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1991 Feb;19(1):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1991
Author
J. Rise
O. Haugejorden
B. Wold
L E Aarö
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1991 Feb;19(1):9-13
Date
Feb-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Carbonated Beverages
Child
Dental Devices, Home Care
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Fluorides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Mouthwashes
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - instrumentation
Sweden
Tablets
Toothbrushing
Toothpaste
Abstract
The present study was part of the project "Health Behavior in Schoolchildren. A WHO Cross National Survey". The distribution of eight dental health behaviors among Finnish, Norwegian, and Swedish schoolchildren aged 11, 13, and 15 yr was studied separately for boys and girls. The sample size approximated 3000 individuals for each country, and the samples are considered to be representative for whole countries. The distinction between individual and collective behavior was empirically supported in this study. Thus collective behaviors (supervised fluoride rinsing and distribution of fluoride tablets) did not vary according to sex but declined with increasing age. On the other hand, individual behaviors varied according to sex and tended to increase in frequency with increasing age. The levels of the studied dental health behaviors were different among the three countries. This may be related to country-specific preventive policies as well as social and cultural norms.
PubMed ID
2019094 View in PubMed
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Oral hygiene habits of 11-year-old schoolchildren in 22 European countries and Canada in 1993/1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34162
Source
J Dent Res. 1997 Sep;76(9):1602-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
S. Kuusela
E. Honkala
L. Kannas
J. Tynjälä
B. Wold
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Dent Res. 1997 Sep;76(9):1602-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior
Dental Devices, Home Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Health Surveys
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Social Class
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
World Health Organization
Abstract
This study is part of the Cross-National Survey on Health Behaviour in School-aged Children--a WHO Collaborative Study, which started in 1982. The aim of the study was to describe the oral hygiene habits (toothbrushing and flossing) of 11-year-old schoolchildren in 22 European countries (Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, FInland, France, Germany, Greenland, Hungary, Israel, Latvia, Lithuania, Northern Ireland, Norway, Poland, Russia, Scotland, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, and Wales) and Canada. The data were collected from standardized anonymous questionnaires in school classrooms during the 1993-1994 school year. At least 1300 school children, representing the whole country, participated in the study in each country. Oral hygiene habits were analyzed according to gender, age, country, school performance, and family economy. The children brushed most favorably in Sweden, Denmark, German, Austria, and Norway (83-73% brushed twice a day). More-than-once-a-day toothbrushing was especially uncommon (from 26 to 33%) among boys in Finland, Lithuania, Russia, Estonia, and Latvia. Toothbrushing frequency differed significantly according to school performance in Canada, the Czech Republic, Scotland, Poland, Northern Ireland, and Wales and between different socio-economic groups in Northern Ireland, Wales, the Czech Republic, Scotland, Poland, and Russia. Use of dental floss was rare. In general, flossing was less frequent among boys than among girls. Daily flossing was most common among Canadian adolescents (25%). In conclusion, there are considerable differences in toothbrushing frequency among children in European countries.
PubMed ID
9294495 View in PubMed
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