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Inequality in oral health-related quality of life before and after a major subsidization reform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278667
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2015 Aug;123(4):267-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Eero Raittio
Satu Lahti
Urpo Kiiskinen
Sari Helminen
Arpo Aromaa
Anna L Suominen
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2015 Aug;123(4):267-75
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Anxiety - psychology
Dental Care - utilization
Dentures
Educational Status
Employment
Female
Finland
Health Care Reform
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Income
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life
Social Determinants of Health
Tooth Loss - psychology
Toothbrushing
Urban health
Abstract
In Finland, a dental subsidization reform, implemented in 2001-2002, abolished age restrictions on subsidized dental care. We investigated income-related inequality in oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and its determinants among adult Finns before and after the reform. Three cross-sectional postal surveys, focusing on perceived oral health and the use of dental services among people born before 1971, were conducted in 2001 (n = 2,046), 2004 (n = 1,728), and 2007 (n = 1,560). Five measures, based on the Oral Health Impact Profile-14, were used as indicators of OHRQoL. Income-related inequality and associated factors were analysed using the concentration index and its decomposition. Prevalence, extent, and severity of oral health impacts were slightly lower in 2007 than in 2001. The oral health impacts were concentrated, at all study time points, among individuals with lower income. Most of the inequality was related to self-perceived general health, tooth loss, and income. Contributions of time since the last dental visit and satisfaction with the last treatment period to the inequality decreased from 2001 to 2007. However, the contributions of these factors were already small (10-20%) in 2001. In general, OHRQoL improved slightly; however, no clear or dramatic change in inequality in OHRQoL was seen after the reform.
PubMed ID
26015152 View in PubMed
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Overweight and obesity weakly predict the development of periodontal infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139869
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2010 Dec;37(12):1059-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Tuomas Saxlin
Pekka Ylöstalo
Liisa Suominen-Taipale
Arpo Aromaa
Matti Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology and Geriatric Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. tuomas.saxlin@oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2010 Dec;37(12):1059-67
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque Index
Disease Progression
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Risk factors
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the association between body weight and periodontal infection in a longitudinal setting.
This study was based on a subpopulation of the Health 2000 Survey that included dentate, non-diabetic subjects aged 30-59 years, who had never smoked and who had participated in the Follow-Up Study on Finnish Adults' Oral Health approximately 4 years later (n=396). The number of new teeth with deepened (4 mm deep or deeper) periodontal pockets in the follow-up examination was used as the outcome variable. Body weight was measured using body mass index, categorized into three categories:
PubMed ID
20969609 View in PubMed
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The role of behaviour in inequality in increments of dental caries among Finnish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269905
Source
Caries Res. 2015;49(1):34-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Wael Sabbah
Anna L Suominen
Miira M Vehkalahti
Arpo Aromaa
Eduardo Bernabé
Source
Caries Res. 2015;49(1):34-40
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Candy - statistics & numerical data
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Smoking - epidemiology
Snacks
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpastes - therapeutic use
Abstract
Evidence from cross-sectional studies implies that dental behaviours partially explain inequalities in oral health.
To assess whether dental behaviours completely eliminate inequality in increments of dental caries in a sample of Finnish adults.
The baseline data were collected from the Health 2000 survey, a nationally representative survey of 8,028 individuals aged 30 years or older living in mainland Finland. Four years later, 1,248 subjects were invited for oral re-examination, and 1,049 agreed to participate (84% response rate). At baseline, participants provided information on demographics, education and dental behaviours (dental attendance, tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste, sugar consumption and daily smoking). Oral examinations at baseline and follow-up were identical.
Adults with basic education had significantly greater increments of DMFT (incidence rate ratio 1.41, 95% CI 1.07-1.85) and DT (incidence rate ratio 2.23, 95% CI 1.27-3.90) than those with high education. Adjusting for single behaviours attenuated but did not eliminate education inequality in DMFT and DT increments, tooth brushing having the greatest impact on inequality. Simultaneous adjustment for all behaviours eliminated the significant relationship between education and caries increment.
Accounting for important dental behaviours appears to explain all education inequality in dental caries in Finnish adults. The results should be interpreted with caution when applied to less egalitarian populations.
PubMed ID
25401295 View in PubMed
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