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Behavioural and demographic factors during early childhood and poor dental health at 10 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175959
Source
Caries Res. 2005 Mar-Apr;39(2):85-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
M-L Mattila
P. Rautava
M. Aromaa
A. Ojanlatva
P. Paunio
L. Hyssälä
H. Helenius
M. Sillanpää
Author Affiliation
Public Health Centre, Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. malema@utu.fi
Source
Caries Res. 2005 Mar-Apr;39(2):85-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Child Behavior
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - complications - prevention & control
Dental Plaque - complications
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Fathers
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Mothers - education
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
The aim was to elucidate whether variables recorded in early childhood would have a long-lasting predictive value of poor dental health at the age of 10 years in a prospectively followed Finnish population-based cohort setting. The second aim was to find new tools for preventive work in order to improve dental health among children. Poor dental health (dmft + DMFT >or= 5) at 10 years of age was associated with child's nocturnal juice drinking at 18 months. It was associated with the following factors at age 3 years: frequent consumption of sweets; infrequent tooth brushing; plaque and caries on teeth. Of family factors, the following were significant: father's young age at birth of the child; mother's basic 9-year education; mother's caries (i.e. several carious teeth per year), and father's infrequent tooth brushing. Early childhood risk factors of poor dental health seem to be stable even after 10 years of life and the changing of teeth from primary to permanent ones. In preventive work, dental health care staff could offer support to those parents with risk factors in their child rearing tasks.
PubMed ID
15741719 View in PubMed
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Changes in dental health and dental health habits from 3 to 5 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201649
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1998;58(4):270-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
M L Mattila
P. Paunio
P. Rautava
A. Ojanlatva
M. Sillanpää
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1998;58(4):270-4
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - pathology - prevention & control
Dental Caries Susceptibility
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dental Plaque Index
Dentin - pathology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Health Education, Dental
Health status
Humans
Male
Mothers - education
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Risk factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
This study sought to determine how dental health and dental health habits change from 3 to 5 years of age and to consider whether preventive dental health care helped in preventing or halting caries in children.
The study included 67 maternity health care clinics, 72 well-baby clinics, and 69 dental health care clinics. Of the 1,292 newborn children, 1,003 (90.8%) were included in this study.
Preventive dental health care contributed to dental caries being halted in only 13.2 percent of those children who had enamel caries at 3 years of age. The dmft index did not increase in 22.6 percent of those children who had dentinal caries at 3 years of age. For all others, the disease became more severe. Toothbrushing habits of 3-year-old children were very consistent over the two years studied. Children were at a risk for caries when their mothers had nine years of basic education, when they already had plaque and caries at 3 years of age, and when the frequency of eating sweets increased the most during the two-year study period.
Among 3-year-old children, plaque is an indicator of caries risk and therefore should be a key element in health education. Those children who already have evidence of caries at 3 years of age should be the target of preventive dental services because of their increased risk.
PubMed ID
10390708 View in PubMed
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Impact of dental health care on dental health of children with long-term diseases: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193690
Source
J Clin Dent. 2001;12(3):77-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
M L Mattila
P. Rautava
P. Paunio
L. Hyssälä
H. Helenius
M. Sillanpää
A. Ojanlatva
Author Affiliation
Dental Health Care Clinic and Public Health Center of Turku, Department of Public Health University of Turku, Finland. malema@utu.fi
Source
J Clin Dent. 2001;12(3):77-82
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child
Consumer Satisfaction
DMF Index
Dental Care for Chronically Ill
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Diet
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Malocclusion - epidemiology
Marital status
Maternal-Child Health Centers - utilization
Oral Health
Parents
Questionnaires
Statistics, nonparametric
Toothbrushing - utilization
Abstract
The objective was to study dental health among nine-year-old long-term ill and disabled children and their matched controls using DMFT/dmft-indices (decayed-missing-filled-teeth, of both permanent and deciduous teeth); to analyze similarities and differences of their family factors; the children's dental health habits which include dietary factors; to assess capabilities of the health care personnel in the identification of the risk groups and in the provision of services; and finally to investigate family satisfaction with the dental health care services provided. One dentist (M-L M) routinely carried out the clinical examinations of the children using the DMFT(dmft)-index. Only cavities extending to dentin were included in the DMF and dmf indices. X-rays were also used. It was found that less than half of the children (46%) had healthy teeth (DMFT and dmft both = 0), with 41% among the study group and 51% among the controls. The DMFS index of the longterm ill children was slightly, but not significantly greater than that of the controls, and these children used dental health care services more but their families were less satisfied with the services. The long-term ill children had less orthodontic care than the controls although they needed it more frequently, and they had a designated candy day significantly more often than the controls. Special diets were associated with long-term ill children, as were the sociodemographic factors of marital status, divorce, or stepfather present. No significant differences existed between the groups in toothbrushing and the use of fluoride products. In the status and health of teeth as measured with the DMFT/dmft indices, there were no statistically significant differences between the group of the long-term-ill children and healthy controls. Estimation of the focusing of care was considered successful concerning dental health, but resource limitations emerged and contributed to parents not being satisfied with the frequency dental care services offered.
PubMed ID
11505965 View in PubMed
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