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A 5-year follow-up study on the prosthetic rehabilitation of the elderly in Helsinki, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179539
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2004 Jul;31(7):647-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
M J Nevalainen
T O Närhi
A. Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2004 Jul;31(7):647-52
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denture, Partial, Fixed - utilization
Denture, Partial, Removable - adverse effects - utilization
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Root Caries - etiology
Saliva - microbiology
Sex Factors
Tooth Loss - epidemiology - etiology - rehabilitation
Abstract
In 1990, 364 elderly (76-86 years) inhabitants of Helsinki, Finland, attended a dental and oral examination study that was conducted as part of the Helsinki Aging Study. In spring 1996, these subjects were recalled for a 5-year follow-up. Between the baseline and follow-up examinations, 114 (31%) subjects had deceased (86 women and 28 men), whereas 134 had either moved, were too ill, or refused to participate in the follow-up. Follow-up examination was conducted for 113 subjects (79 women and 34 men), with the participating rate being 46%. Five subjects became edentulous during the follow-up. Of the subjects, 61% had 1-32 teeth at follow-up. In these subjects, the mean number of teeth decreased from 14.9 (+/-8.3) to 13.5 (+/-8.6) (P
PubMed ID
15210024 View in PubMed
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A 9-year longitudinal study of reported oral problems and dental and periodontal status in 70- and 79-year-old city cohorts in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62838
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):76-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
G. Nordström
B. Bergman
K. Borg
H. Nilsson
A. Tillberg
J H Wenslöv
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):76-84
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Dental Care for Aged - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dentures - statistics & numerical data
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance, Dental - utilization
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Periodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Before 1981 no representative studies of oral health in an elderly population in northern Sweden had been presented, and longitudinal studies of oral health in the aging person were in general rare. Thus the aim of this study was to investigate longitudinal changes in oral health in a representative sample of an elderly city population in northern Sweden. Reported oral problems and treatment needs were noted, and dental and periodontal status was registered in clinical examinations. The frequency of reported annual dental visits and of being called by the dentist increased in the younger but not in the older cohort during the 9-year period. In 1990 all the 79- and 88-year-olds with annual visits reported that they were recalled by the dentist. The clinical investigation showed an increasing amount of tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease with increasing age. Among dentulous persons 1.7 teeth per subject were lost from 1981 to 1990 in the younger cohort, compared with 2.6 teeth per subject in the older cohort. The number of sound teeth decreased very little in the younger cohort (from 3.44 to 3.34) but more evidently in the older cohort (from 3.47 to 2.65) during the 9-year period. The frequency of surfaces with attachment level > 3 mm increased statistically significantly from 1981 to 1990 in the older cohort. Subjects with annual visits had in general fewer oral problems.
PubMed ID
9669457 View in PubMed
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A 15-year series analysis of caries development related to a socioeconomic variable. A study of the year group leaving the organised dental care in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75752
Source
Swed Dent J. 2003;27(3):151-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Yngve Swedberg
Jörgen G Norén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg, Sweden. ynsw@home.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2003;27(3):151-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Prevalence
State Dentistry
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
In a long-term series analysis the study had the aim of detecting how the used socioeconomic variables were related to the caries status development in the year group leaving the organised dental care. The study included caries epidemiological records of individuals at the Public Dental Service of Göteborg, leaving the organised dental care during 1986-2000. The City of Göteborg was divided into four districts. One incidence and one prevalence caries index was used, each presented in two subgroups: individuals with no caries record and patients with 20% of the highest index values. The socio-economical variable was individuals 18-64 years of age, seeking employment, as a percentage of the corresponding group of all inhabitants. The registered values were divided into three time sections of five years each. In the first, the socio-economic value curves were almost horizontal, in the second they showed a considerable increasing and in the third a declining tendency. The result curves for the caries-free patient groups and for patients with 20% of the highest caries index values compared to the three socioeconomical time sector results, showed an almost horizontal level concerning the incidence index values, and for the prevalence index values an inclined curve structure to the incidence curves. The result curves for the incidence index with respect to the caries-free patient group showed an almost horizontal structure, while the prevalence curves inclined towards the incidence curves during the study period. The linear structure of these curves deviated considerably from the result curves for the socio-economic time series. No correlation existed between the socio-economic data and the studied caries index values. The need for determining the time length concerning caries index observations was discussed. It must be of special interest to maintain the dental health of the studied patient group and the individuals' relation to regular dental care, when as adults they meet the dental care economy.
PubMed ID
14608971 View in PubMed
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20-year follow-up of patients receiving high-cost dental care within the Swedish Dental Insurance System: 1977-1978 to 1998-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81267
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(2):77-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Petersson Kerstin
Pamenius Madeleine
Eliasson Alf
Narby Birger
Holender Frieda
Palmqvist Sigvard
Håkansson Jan
Author Affiliation
Dept of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Sweden. kerstin.petersson@od.mah.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(2):77-86
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denture, Partial, Fixed - economics
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Insurance, Dental - economics
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Periodontitis - diagnosis
Prognosis
Root Canal Therapy - economics
Sweden
Tooth Loss - diagnosis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective was to perform a long-term follow-up study of patients that had received high cost dental care within the Swedish National Dental Insurance System in 1977-1978 with special focus on remaining teeth, periodontal disease progression, change in the prevalence of root-filled teeth and teeth with apical periodontitis as well as the survival of fixed prosthetic reconstructions. All 262 patients who had had their treatment plans sent for approval for high-cost dental care in 4 local health insurance districts and who were sampled for base-line studies in 1977-1978, were offered a free clinical examination including radiographs in 1998. 177 patients (68 % of the original sample) could be reached for telephone interview and 104 of them (40 % of the original sample) were examined clinically and radiographically. Comparisons were made with records and radiographs from 1977-1978. The analyses were performed with the individual patient as the studied unit. The low progression of severe periodontal disease during the 20-23 year follow-up period and the decrease in number of teeth with apical periodontitis among a majority of the patients examined, indicated that the dental care received resulted in a limitation of dental disease on the individual level. Furthermore 63 % of the patients had the fixed prosthetic reconstructions, received after approval 1977-1978, in full extention after 20-23 years. However, more tooth losses were observed among the patients in this study than in similar studies in Swedish general populations over the same decades. Furthermore multiple tooth extractions were significantly more frequent in patients with severe periodontitis at baseline and in patients with less apical periodontitis at follow-up in this study. Thus it seems that tooth extraction not seldom was a treatment choice for teeth with severe periodontitis and apical periodontitis among the patients examined clinically in this study.
PubMed ID
16878683 View in PubMed
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A 24-year follow-up of root filled teeth and periapical health amongst middle aged and elderly women in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70741
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Apr;38(4):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
F. Frisk
M. Hakeberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Endodontology/Oral Diagnosis, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. fredrik.frisk@lio.se
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Apr;38(4):246-54
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Periapical Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Radiography, Panoramic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Tooth, Nonvital - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: To describe the endodontic status amongst middle-aged and elderly women longitudinally and cross-sectionally over 24 years. METHODOLOGY: A random sample of 1462 women 38, 46, 50, 54 and 60 years old, living in Göteborg, Sweden, were sampled in 1968 for medical and dental examinations with a participation rate of 90.1%. The same women were re-examined in 1980 and 1992 together with new 38- and 50-year-old women. The dental examination consisted of questionnaires, clinical and panoramic radiological survey (OPG). The number of teeth, number of root filled teeth (RF) and number of teeth with periapical radiolucencies (PA) were registered. The RF and PA ratios were calculated. Cross-sectional data were analysed by means of anova and longitudinal data by a general linear model for repeated measures. Sample prevalences were compared and statistical inferences were made with the chi-squared test. In all analysis, the confidence interval (CI) regarded mean difference between groups (95% CI). RESULTS: The RF and PA ratio decreased over time as well as the frequency of edentulous subjects. Cross-sectional analysis revealed a minor increase in frequency of RF and PA and loss of teeth with age. Longitudinally, loss of teeth was evident in all cohorts. In addition, there was a trend of lower number of teeth with PA, and the RF ratio increased with age. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of periapical disease did not increase with age, probably as a result of root canal treatment and extractions. Data showed that the prevalence of RF teeth and teeth with PA decreased for comparable age cohorts during the 24-year follow-up.
PubMed ID
15810975 View in PubMed
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A 57-year follow-up of occlusal changes, oral health, and attitudes toward teeth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135775
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Arild Stenvik
Lisen Espeland
Rolf E Berg
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011 Apr;139(4 Suppl):S102-8
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Child
Dental Care - utilization
Esthetics, Dental
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Malocclusion - complications - pathology - psychology
Malocclusion, Angle Class III - etiology
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - utilization
Photography, Dental
Self-Assessment
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - etiology
Tooth Loss - etiology
Abstract
Very few studies have addressed long-term development and risks associated with untreated malocclusion. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in occlusion in a lifelong perspective and to compare oral health and attitudes toward teeth among persons with malocclusion with those having normal occlusion.
In 1950 an epidemiologic survey of 2349 8-year-olds was conducted and included 4 intraoral photographs. Three selected samples with different malocclusions (deep bite, crossbite, or irregular teeth) and 1 sample with normal occlusion (a total of 183 subjects) were, 57 years later, invited for examination and an extensive interview about dental experiences and attitudes. Sixty-nine responded (38%) and constitute the subjects studied.
Malocclusion remained the same or worsened except in subjects having deep bite in childhood, which in some improved and in others became worse. Crowding generally increased. Sixteen persons reported moderate or severe temporomandular joint (TMJ) problems, and of these 7 belonged to the group with crossbite in childhood. With few exceptions, the subjects in all samples had good oral hygiene, visited the dentist regularly, and had well-preserved dentitions. Mean number of missing teeth was significantly lower among those with normal occlusion compared with the malocclusion groups. Individuals with normal occlusion responded favorably to all questions related to attitudes and experiences about their teeth, while responses in the malocclusion groups varied.
Persons with the particular malocclusions examined experienced more problems related to teeth later in life compared with those having normal occlusion in childhood.
PubMed ID
21435527 View in PubMed
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A 57-year follow-up study of occlusion : part 1: oral health and attitudes to teeth among individuals with normal occlusion at the age of 8 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157006
Source
J Orofac Orthop. 2008 May;69(3):201-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Rolf Elling Berg
Arild Stenvik
Lisen Espeland
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, University of Oslo, Norway. rolfell@start.no
Source
J Orofac Orthop. 2008 May;69(3):201-12
Date
May-2008
Language
English
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Dental Occlusion
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Health
Prevalence
Reference Values
Self Concept
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
To analyze occlusal changes between the ages of 8 and 65 years in 18 persons with normal occlusion at the age of 8 (N-group), to describe their attitudes toward dental esthetics and their experiences regarding their dentition.
The N-group is considered as the reference group in comparison with malocclusion groups that will be presented in subsequent articles. Documentation is based on intraoral photographs and personal interviews.
In general, the occlusal changes were moderate. The probands were all satisfied with their teeth and tooth position. They were all examined at regular intervals by their dentists and practiced generally good oral hygiene. The average number of missing teeth was 1.4 (0-6) and the number of prosthodontically -restored or replaced teeth was 6.4 (0-24). Fifteen persons reported well-positioned teeth to be important. However, 17 found that visibly poor oral hygiene, discolored or missing teeth or the "total impression", to be more important than malpositioned front teeth.
Generally speaking, occlusal changes were moderate and satisfaction with the dentition was good. Discolored or missing teeth and poor oral hygiene were found to be the most disturbing negative traits with respect to dental esthetics.
PubMed ID
18506405 View in PubMed
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1970 preventive dentistry program. Immediate and long-term results of a control program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6316
Source
Alaska Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;42(3):88-90
Publication Type
Article

Addressing the obesity epidemic: what is the dentist's role?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160732
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Oct;73(8):707-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Jean-Philippe Chaput
Jo-Anne Gilbert
Christian Caron
Belinda Nicolau
Angelo Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Division of Kinesiology (PEPS), Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Oct;73(8):707-9
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Dentists
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Professional Role
Risk factors
Tooth Loss - complications
PubMed ID
17949536 View in PubMed
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Age-period-cohort analysis of trends in toothache prevalence among 15- to 64-yr-old Finns over a 25-yr period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307526
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2020 02; 128(1):66-73
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-2020
Author
Eero Raittio
Satu Helakorpi
Anna L Suominen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2020 02; 128(1):66-73
Date
02-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Tooth loss
Toothache - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Information on long-term trends in toothache prevalence is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess age-, period-, and cohort-related changes in toothache prevalence among 15- to 64-yr-old adults in Finland between 1990 and 2014 by using annual, representative postal surveys, albeit with decreasing response rates from 76% (n = 3,812) to 53% (n = 2,630). Age-period-cohort analysis of toothache prevalence during the past month was performed. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to account for other factors contributing to toothache. Toothache prevalence increased from 7% to 12% during the time period 1990 to 2014. Age-period-cohort analysis revealed that toothache prevalence increased from cohort to cohort, especially from the 1960 birth cohorts onwards (cohort effect). Adults under 30 yr of age had the highest toothache prevalence (~17%), while, in those over 30 yr of age, toothache prevalence decreased steadily according to age (to ~5% at age 64 yr, age effect). Toothache prevalence peaked at ~ 11% in the mid-2000s (period effect). Toothache was strongly associated with poorer perceived health and lower toothbrushing frequency and less strongly associated with higher educational level, a higher number of missing teeth, history of smoking, being single, separated, or divorced, and female gender. The increase in toothache prevalence occurred especially from 1990 to the mid-2000s, and mainly among younger age groups and more recent cohorts.
PubMed ID
31876338 View in PubMed
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277 records – page 1 of 28.