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154 records – page 1 of 16.

A 5-year follow-up study on the prosthetic rehabilitation of the elderly in Helsinki, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179539
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2004 Jul;31(7):647-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
M J Nevalainen
T O Närhi
A. Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2004 Jul;31(7):647-52
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denture, Partial, Fixed - utilization
Denture, Partial, Removable - adverse effects - utilization
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Root Caries - etiology
Saliva - microbiology
Sex Factors
Tooth Loss - epidemiology - etiology - rehabilitation
Abstract
In 1990, 364 elderly (76-86 years) inhabitants of Helsinki, Finland, attended a dental and oral examination study that was conducted as part of the Helsinki Aging Study. In spring 1996, these subjects were recalled for a 5-year follow-up. Between the baseline and follow-up examinations, 114 (31%) subjects had deceased (86 women and 28 men), whereas 134 had either moved, were too ill, or refused to participate in the follow-up. Follow-up examination was conducted for 113 subjects (79 women and 34 men), with the participating rate being 46%. Five subjects became edentulous during the follow-up. Of the subjects, 61% had 1-32 teeth at follow-up. In these subjects, the mean number of teeth decreased from 14.9 (+/-8.3) to 13.5 (+/-8.6) (P
PubMed ID
15210024 View in PubMed
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A 9-year longitudinal study of reported oral problems and dental and periodontal status in 70- and 79-year-old city cohorts in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62838
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):76-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
G. Nordström
B. Bergman
K. Borg
H. Nilsson
A. Tillberg
J H Wenslöv
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):76-84
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Dental Care for Aged - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dentures - statistics & numerical data
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance, Dental - utilization
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Periodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Before 1981 no representative studies of oral health in an elderly population in northern Sweden had been presented, and longitudinal studies of oral health in the aging person were in general rare. Thus the aim of this study was to investigate longitudinal changes in oral health in a representative sample of an elderly city population in northern Sweden. Reported oral problems and treatment needs were noted, and dental and periodontal status was registered in clinical examinations. The frequency of reported annual dental visits and of being called by the dentist increased in the younger but not in the older cohort during the 9-year period. In 1990 all the 79- and 88-year-olds with annual visits reported that they were recalled by the dentist. The clinical investigation showed an increasing amount of tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease with increasing age. Among dentulous persons 1.7 teeth per subject were lost from 1981 to 1990 in the younger cohort, compared with 2.6 teeth per subject in the older cohort. The number of sound teeth decreased very little in the younger cohort (from 3.44 to 3.34) but more evidently in the older cohort (from 3.47 to 2.65) during the 9-year period. The frequency of surfaces with attachment level > 3 mm increased statistically significantly from 1981 to 1990 in the older cohort. Subjects with annual visits had in general fewer oral problems.
PubMed ID
9669457 View in PubMed
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A 15-year series analysis of caries development related to a socioeconomic variable. A study of the year group leaving the organised dental care in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75752
Source
Swed Dent J. 2003;27(3):151-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Yngve Swedberg
Jörgen G Norén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg, Sweden. ynsw@home.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2003;27(3):151-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Prevalence
State Dentistry
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
In a long-term series analysis the study had the aim of detecting how the used socioeconomic variables were related to the caries status development in the year group leaving the organised dental care. The study included caries epidemiological records of individuals at the Public Dental Service of Göteborg, leaving the organised dental care during 1986-2000. The City of Göteborg was divided into four districts. One incidence and one prevalence caries index was used, each presented in two subgroups: individuals with no caries record and patients with 20% of the highest index values. The socio-economical variable was individuals 18-64 years of age, seeking employment, as a percentage of the corresponding group of all inhabitants. The registered values were divided into three time sections of five years each. In the first, the socio-economic value curves were almost horizontal, in the second they showed a considerable increasing and in the third a declining tendency. The result curves for the caries-free patient groups and for patients with 20% of the highest caries index values compared to the three socioeconomical time sector results, showed an almost horizontal level concerning the incidence index values, and for the prevalence index values an inclined curve structure to the incidence curves. The result curves for the incidence index with respect to the caries-free patient group showed an almost horizontal structure, while the prevalence curves inclined towards the incidence curves during the study period. The linear structure of these curves deviated considerably from the result curves for the socio-economic time series. No correlation existed between the socio-economic data and the studied caries index values. The need for determining the time length concerning caries index observations was discussed. It must be of special interest to maintain the dental health of the studied patient group and the individuals' relation to regular dental care, when as adults they meet the dental care economy.
PubMed ID
14608971 View in PubMed
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A 24-year follow-up of root filled teeth and periapical health amongst middle aged and elderly women in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70741
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Apr;38(4):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
F. Frisk
M. Hakeberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Endodontology/Oral Diagnosis, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. fredrik.frisk@lio.se
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Apr;38(4):246-54
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Periapical Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Radiography, Panoramic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Tooth, Nonvital - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: To describe the endodontic status amongst middle-aged and elderly women longitudinally and cross-sectionally over 24 years. METHODOLOGY: A random sample of 1462 women 38, 46, 50, 54 and 60 years old, living in Göteborg, Sweden, were sampled in 1968 for medical and dental examinations with a participation rate of 90.1%. The same women were re-examined in 1980 and 1992 together with new 38- and 50-year-old women. The dental examination consisted of questionnaires, clinical and panoramic radiological survey (OPG). The number of teeth, number of root filled teeth (RF) and number of teeth with periapical radiolucencies (PA) were registered. The RF and PA ratios were calculated. Cross-sectional data were analysed by means of anova and longitudinal data by a general linear model for repeated measures. Sample prevalences were compared and statistical inferences were made with the chi-squared test. In all analysis, the confidence interval (CI) regarded mean difference between groups (95% CI). RESULTS: The RF and PA ratio decreased over time as well as the frequency of edentulous subjects. Cross-sectional analysis revealed a minor increase in frequency of RF and PA and loss of teeth with age. Longitudinally, loss of teeth was evident in all cohorts. In addition, there was a trend of lower number of teeth with PA, and the RF ratio increased with age. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of periapical disease did not increase with age, probably as a result of root canal treatment and extractions. Data showed that the prevalence of RF teeth and teeth with PA decreased for comparable age cohorts during the 24-year follow-up.
PubMed ID
15810975 View in PubMed
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A 57-year follow-up study of occlusion : part 1: oral health and attitudes to teeth among individuals with normal occlusion at the age of 8 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157006
Source
J Orofac Orthop. 2008 May;69(3):201-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Rolf Elling Berg
Arild Stenvik
Lisen Espeland
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, University of Oslo, Norway. rolfell@start.no
Source
J Orofac Orthop. 2008 May;69(3):201-12
Date
May-2008
Language
English
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Dental Occlusion
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Health
Prevalence
Reference Values
Self Concept
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
To analyze occlusal changes between the ages of 8 and 65 years in 18 persons with normal occlusion at the age of 8 (N-group), to describe their attitudes toward dental esthetics and their experiences regarding their dentition.
The N-group is considered as the reference group in comparison with malocclusion groups that will be presented in subsequent articles. Documentation is based on intraoral photographs and personal interviews.
In general, the occlusal changes were moderate. The probands were all satisfied with their teeth and tooth position. They were all examined at regular intervals by their dentists and practiced generally good oral hygiene. The average number of missing teeth was 1.4 (0-6) and the number of prosthodontically -restored or replaced teeth was 6.4 (0-24). Fifteen persons reported well-positioned teeth to be important. However, 17 found that visibly poor oral hygiene, discolored or missing teeth or the "total impression", to be more important than malpositioned front teeth.
Generally speaking, occlusal changes were moderate and satisfaction with the dentition was good. Discolored or missing teeth and poor oral hygiene were found to be the most disturbing negative traits with respect to dental esthetics.
PubMed ID
18506405 View in PubMed
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Amount and type of alcohol consumption and missing teeth among community-dwelling older adults: findings from the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127155
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karen Heegaard
Kirsten Avlund
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Allan Bardow
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.heegaard@mail.tele.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - classification - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study if an association between total weekly intake of alcohol, type-specific weekly alcohol intake, alcoholic beverage preference, and the number of teeth among older people exists.
A cross-sectional study including a total of 783 community-dwelling men and women aged 65-95 years who were interviewed about alcohol drinking habits and underwent a clinical oral and dental examination. Multiple regression analyses were applied for studying the association between total weekly alcohol consumption, beverage-specific alcohol consumption, beverage preference (defined as the highest intake of one beverage type compared with two other types), and the number of remaining teeth (= 20 versus >20 remaining teeth).
The odds ratio (OR) of having a low number of teeth decreased with the total intake of alcohol in women, with ORs for a low number of teeth of 0.40 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.76] in women drinking 1-14 drinks per week and 0.34 (95 percent CI 0.16-0.74) in women with an intake of more than 14 drinks per week compared with abstainers. Similar relations could also be obtained for type-specific alcohol intake of wine and for wine and spirits preference among women. Men who preferred beer showed a decreased risk for a low number of teeth compared with men with other alcohol preferences.
In this study, alcohol consumption, wine drinking, and wine and spirits preference among women were associated with a higher number of teeth compared with abstainers. Among men, those who preferred beer also had a higher number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22320290 View in PubMed
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An oral health survey of Head Start children in Alaska: oral health status, treatment needs, and cost of treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6187
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1992;52(2):86-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
D B Jones
C M Schlife
K R Phipps
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage 99501.
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1992;52(2):86-93
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Child Day Care Centers
Child Health Services - economics - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Costs and Cost Analysis
DMF Index
Dental Care - economics - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Medical Indigency - economics - statistics & numerical data
Oral Health
Regression Analysis
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to obtain information on the oral health status, treatment needs, and cost of treatment for Head Start children in Alaska. Twenty communities, representing five regions within the state, were selected for participation. The study consisted of three distinct parts: a caries status exam, a sociodemographic questionnaire, and a treatment needs examination. A total of 544 children between three and five years old were examined. The mean dmft and dmfs scores were 3.91 and 8.73, respectively. When stratified by race, the Alaska Native children had significantly higher mean dmft and dmfs scores. When stratified by community of residence, those children residing in the rural communities had higher rates of dental caries than the urban children. Forty-five percent of the total sample was in need of dental restorative treatment, excluding examinations, radiographs, and preventive services. The proportion of rural children needing care was much higher than the urban children (59% vs 27%). On average, each urban child needed treatment on 0.7 teeth, while each rural child needed treatment on 2.8 teeth. When all treatment factors including sedation and transportation costs are considered, the potential cost of treatment for the 1,475 children enrolled in the Alaska Head Start programs was $601,624.
PubMed ID
1564696 View in PubMed
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Association between clinical and subjective indicators of oral health status in an older adult population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216839
Source
Gerodontology. 1994 Dec;11(2):108-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
D. Locker
G. Slade
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry and Community, Dental Health Services Research Unit, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Gerodontology. 1994 Dec;11(2):108-14
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
DMF Index
Dental Care for Aged - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Periodontal Index
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sickness Impact Profile
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Tooth Loss - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Since the mid-1970s a number of investigators have developed measures of the extent to which oral disorders compromise functional, social and psychological well-being. They have also examined the associations between clinical indicators of oral health status and these subjective indicators. In general, these associations have been inconsistent and weak. One reason for this might be that the subjective indicators employed were rudimentary and insensitive to the health outcomes of oral disorders. The development of the Oral Health Impact Profile, a more sophisticated measure of the health outcomes of oral disorders, provided a method to examine this hypothesis. Using data from an oral health survey of older adults, we examined the associations between OHIP scores and a variety of clinical indicators of tooth loss, caries and periodontal disease. Even with this measure the associations were predominantly weak, the strongest of the correlations being 0.53. We also examined the influence of personal and sociodemographic characteristics on the relationship between tooth loss and its psychosocial outcomes. Five variables reflecting expectations and resources explained as much variance in OHIP scores as did the number of missing teeth. This analysis illustrates the essential distinction between disease and health and the way in which measures of oral health can be used to pursue fundamental issues in behavioural science and health services research.
PubMed ID
7750964 View in PubMed
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Association between moderate to severe psoriasis and periodontitis in a Scandinavian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266915
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:139
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Rasa Skudutyte-Rysstad
Ellen Margrethe Slevolden
Bjørn Frode Hansen
Leiv Sandvik
Hans Ragnar Preus
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:139
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Periodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Periodontitis - epidemiology
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage
Prevalence
Psoriasis - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare the prevalence of periodontitis and alveolar bone loss among individuals with psoriasis and a group of randomly selected controls.
Fifty individuals with psoriasis and 121 controls completed a structured questionnaire, and were examined clinically and radiographically. Oral examination included numbers of missing teeth, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), presence of dental plaque and bleeding on probing, as well as alveolar bone loss from radiographs. Questionnaires requested information on age, gender, education, dental care, smoking habits, general diseases and medicament use. For adjustment for baseline differences between psoriasis individuals and controls the propensity score based on gender, age and education was computed using multivariate logistic regression. A subsample analysis for propensity score matched psoriasis individuals (n?=?50) and controls (n?=?50) was performed.
When compared with controls, psoriasis individuals had significantly more missing teeth and more sites with plaque and bleeding on probing. The prevalence of moderate and severe periodontitis was significantly higher among psoriasis individuals (24%) compared to healthy controls (10%). Similarly, 36% of psoriasis cases had one or more sites with radiographic bone loss =3 mm, compared to 13% of controls. Logistic regression analysis showed that the association between moderate/severe periodontitis and psoriasis remained statistically significant when adjusted for propensity score, but was attenuated when smoking was entered into the model. The association between psoriasis and one or more sites with bone loss =3 mm remained statistically significant when adjusted for propensity score and smoking and regularity of dental visits. In the propensity score (age, gender and education) matched sample (n?=?100) psoriasis remained significantly associated with moderate/severe periodontitis and radiographic bone loss.
Within the limits of the present study, periodontitis and radiographic bone loss is more common among patients with moderate/severe psoriasis compared with the general population. This association remained significant after controlling for confounders.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25427764 View in PubMed
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Association between periodontal disease and ischemic heart disease among Swedish women: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151946
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(4):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Ulrika Stenman
Anette Wennström
Margareta Ahlqwist
Calle Bengtsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Lauren Lissner
Magnus Hakeberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Ulrika.Stenman@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2009;67(4):193-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Chronic Periodontitis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gingival Pocket - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology
Personal Satisfaction
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to analyze the relationship between chronic periodontitis and ischemic heart disease (IHD).
A cross-section of women aged 38 to 84 years were examined in 1992-93 (analysis based on n=1056). Medical and dental examinations were included in the analysis specifically with regard to IHD and periodontitis. Other well-known risk factors for IHD were used as covariates in multivariable statistical analysis.
Among the dentate women in this study (n=847), 74 had IHD and 773 did not. There was no statistically significant difference between numbers of pathological gingival pockets between these groups (58.1% had one or more pathological pockets in the IHD group compared to 57.6% in the non-IHD group). Bivariate analysis of dentate individuals showed significant associations between IHD and number of missing teeth, age, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, life satisfaction, hypertension, and levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. However, in the final multivariable logistic regression model, with the exception of age, only number of teeth (
PubMed ID
19301159 View in PubMed
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154 records – page 1 of 16.