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139 records – page 1 of 14.

[Acceleration of the physical development of Moscow schoolchildren].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109607
Source
Gig Sanit. 1970 Mar;35(3):31-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1970

Accuracy of the Third Molar Eruption Predictor in predicting eruption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194372
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2001 Jun;91(6):638-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
I. Ventä
S. Schou
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. irja.venta@helsinki.fi
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2001 Jun;91(6):638-42
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bayes Theorem
Calibration
Denmark
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting - methods
Humans
Male
Molar - radiography
Molar, Third - physiology - radiography
Observer Variation
Odontometry
Probability
Radiography, Panoramic
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Tooth Crown - radiography
Tooth Eruption
Tooth, Impacted - physiopathology
Tooth, Unerupted - physiopathology - radiography
Abstract
To evaluate the possibility of applying the Third Molar Eruption Predictor to all panoramic radiographs.
Panoramic radiographs were retrospectively analyzed from a 4-year follow-up study of third molars carried out at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. The radiographs, taken at a mean age of 20.6 years, included 45 unerupted or partially erupted mandibular third molars in 28 subjects. Because the device was calibrated both with simple proportions and by use of the methods of Bayes' Decision Theory, the separation point of the device was therefore adjusted at 12 mm from the distal surface of the second molar.
The predictions of future eruption or impaction made with the calibrated device and the actual clinical outcome 4 years later were in conformity for 80% of the mandibular third molars.
The Third Molar Eruption Predictor may be applied to all panoramic radiographs, but it seems to require calibration before use.
PubMed ID
11402274 View in PubMed
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Advanced dental maturity in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198064
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2000 Jun;108(3):184-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
A. Lehtinen
T. Oksa
H. Helenius
O. Rönning
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2000 Jun;108(3):184-8
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Arthritis, Juvenile - physiopathology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Observer Variation
Radiography, Bitewing
Random Allocation
Reproducibility of Results
Single-Blind Method
Statistics, nonparametric
Tooth - growth & development
Tooth Calcification - physiology
Tooth Eruption - physiology
Abstract
The subjects of the investigation comprised 95 girls and 73 boys with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), and 102 girls and 66 boys representing healthy controls, all with a chronological age from 6.3 to 14.4 yr. The dental development was assessed from panoramic radiographs using a seven-tooth model. The radiographs were evaluated on three separate occasions with a minimum interval of one month in a randomized order, and blind with respect to absence or presence of JRA. In both JRA patients and healthy controls, dental maturity was ahead of chronological age. In addition, dental maturity was significantly advanced in JRA patients with 0.26 yr in girls and 0.28 yr in boys. It is tentatively suggested that the advanced dental development in JRA patients compared with healthy children was partly an effect of treatment with cortisone, while the influence of the disorder per se remains to be elucidated.
PubMed ID
10872987 View in PubMed
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Age estimation in small children: reference values based on counts of deciduous teeth in Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198357
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2000 Jun 5;110(3):179-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-2000
Author
M. Nyström
L. Peck
E. Kleemola-Kujala
M. Evälahti
M. Kataja
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, P.O. Box 41, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland. marjatta.nystrom@helsinki.fi
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2000 Jun 5;110(3):179-88
Date
Jun-5-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Determination by Teeth
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Reference Values
Tooth Eruption
Tooth, Deciduous
Abstract
The eruption of teeth in the mouth is suitable for age estimations during the period when teeth are actively emerging, in the deciduous dentition phase approximately from the age of 6 months to 2.5 years. Estimations of age can be performed simply by counting the number of teeth in the mouth. Reliability of the estimates depends on the reference data available and each population group should preferably have its own standards. In the present study timing of eruption of successive deciduous teeth was studied longitudinally in 129 Finns. The dates of clinical eruption of deciduous teeth were recorded by mothers and checked by dentists. In 40 of the 129 children emergence ages of at the most the four last teeth were based only on semiannual registrations performed by dentists. The main purpose was to provide normal timetables of tooth eruption in small children in forms that are practical in estimations of dental age. No sexual dimorphism existed in the timing of clinical eruption of successive deciduous teeth. The mean age corresponding to the presence of one tooth in the mouth was 7.1 months (S.D.=1.78) and that corresponding to tooth count 19 was 27.8 months (S.D.=3.99). If the chronological age is known, the presented distributions and means with variations make it possible to estimate the degree of advancement or delay in a child's dental development. If the age of the child is not known, the mean and median ages can be used for estimations of chronological age. However, estimations of age should not be based only on tooth counts because of marked variation also within this homogeneous group.
PubMed ID
10842029 View in PubMed
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[Age of eruption of the permanent teeth]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42972
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1974 Jul-Aug;(4):29-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Udovitskaia
L B Leporskaia
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1974 Jul-Aug;(4):29-30
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Dentition
Humans
Tooth Eruption
PubMed ID
4463323 View in PubMed
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[Age variations for the eruption of teeth in Norwegian school children. A cross investigation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43380
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1973 Feb;83(2):42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1973

[An epidemiologic investigation of the occurrence of caries, plaque and gingivitis in children going to kindergarten in Horsholm Community]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43592
Source
Tandlaegebladet. 1972 Jul;76(7):626-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1972

Applying modern survival analysis methods to longitudinal dental caries studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191663
Source
J Dent Res. 2002 Feb;81(2):144-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
T. Härkäne
M A Larmas
J I Virtanen
E. Arjas
Author Affiliation
Rolf Nevanlinna Institute, University of Helsinki, Finland. Tommi.Harkanen@RNI.helsinki.fi
Source
J Dent Res. 2002 Feb;81(2):144-8
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Algorithms
Bayes Theorem
Child
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - etiology
Dental Caries Susceptibility
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Male
Molar - pathology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Tooth - pathology
Tooth Eruption
Abstract
Before the 1960s, tooth-specific caries risk was reported to be highest at 2 to 4 years after eruption. We studied the tooth-specific caries risk in three contemporary age cohorts in Finland. All together, 4072 boys and girls were followed annually from age 6 to age 18+ years in three age cohorts born in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. We used a survival model and Bayesian inferential methods in the statistical analyses to establish the secular changes during this period. The analysis was based on the caries risk in individual teeth as a function of tooth age instead of summary measures, such as DMFS values. Our first finding was a marked overall decrease of caries. Moreover, analyses of the 1960 and 1970 cohorts revealed that the risk in molar teeth was highest immediately after eruption; in the youngest cohort, however, the risks of individual teeth were so low that no such dependencies on tooth age could be established.
PubMed ID
11827260 View in PubMed
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Canadian Eskimo permanent tooth emergence timing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1610
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 1978 Aug; 49(2):211-216.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
Mayhall, J.T.
Belier, P.L.
Mayhall, M.F.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 1978 Aug; 49(2):211-216.
Date
1978
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Igloolik
Hall Beach
Probit analysis
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Bicuspid - physiology
Canada
Cuspid - physiology
Female
Humans
Incisor - physiology
Inuits
Male
Molar - physiology
Sex Factors
Statistics
Tooth Eruption
Tooth, Deciduous - physiology
Abstract
To identify the times of emergence of the permanent teeth of Canadian Eskimos (Inuit), 368 children and adolescents were examined. The presence or absence of all permanent teeth except the third molars was recorded and these data subjected to probit analysis. Female emergence times were advanced over males. Generally, the Inuit of both sexes showed statistically significant earlier emergence times than Montreal children, except for the incisors. The present results do not support hypotheses indicating that premature extraction of the deciduous teeth advances the emergence of their succedaneous counterparts. There is some indication the controls of deciduous tooth emergence continue to play some part in emergence of the permanent dentition, especially the first permanent teeth that emerge.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1263.
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Can crown-root ratio predict premolar eruption?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6587
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2006 Mar;129(3):331-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Paul Rowlands
Rebecca Poling
Dina Slater
Ross Hobson
Nick Steen
Author Affiliation
St Helen's Dental Practice, Cockermouth, Cumbria, United Kingdom.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2006 Mar;129(3):331-6
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicuspid - physiology
Child
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Mandible
Odontometry - methods
Radiography, Panoramic
Tooth Crown - anatomy & histology - radiography
Tooth Eruption - physiology
Tooth Root - anatomy & histology - radiography
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to establish a method to prospectively predict the eruption of mandibular second premolars with panoramic radiographs. This technique could be used clinically to optimize the timing of comprehensive treatment, detect abnormalities of development and eruption, or effectively estimate eruption timing and determine the need for early intervention because of caries or defects of the deciduous dentition. METHODS: Three hundred one white children from an orthodontic practice in Alaska between the ages of 6 and 16 years were examined and monitored with serial panoramic radiographs until all premolars had erupted. Eruption of the mandibular second premolar was predicted at the first examination based on the panoramic radiograph. When the mandibular second premolar erupted, a researcher measured the crown length to crown-plus-root length ratio on the radiograph using the Simpson and Kunos scale, and the prospectively predicted timing of eruption was compared with the actual timing. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The Simpson and Kunos scale allowed a rapid assessment for predicting the time of eruption of mandibular second premolars. The mean age of eruption of the mandibular second premolar in these children was 12.5 years.
PubMed ID
16527627 View in PubMed
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139 records – page 1 of 14.