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279 records – page 1 of 28.

A 2-year community-randomized controlled trial of fluoride varnish to prevent early childhood caries in Aboriginal children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157658
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;36(6):503-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Herenia P Lawrence
Darlene Binguis
Jan Douglas
Lynda McKeown
Bonita Switzer
Rafael Figueiredo
Audrey Laporte
Author Affiliation
Community Dentistry Discipline, Department of Biological and Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. herenia.lawrence@utoronto.ca
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;36(6):503-16
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - education
Cariostatic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Health Education, Dental
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sodium Fluoride - administration & dosage
Tooth, Deciduous
Abstract
To measure the effectiveness of fluoride varnish (FV) (Duraflor), 5% sodium fluoride, Pharmascience Inc., Montréal, QC, Canada) and caregiver counseling in preventing early childhood caries (ECC) in Aboriginal children in a 2-year community-randomized controlled trial.
Twenty First Nations communities in the Sioux Lookout Zone (SLZ), Northwest Ontario, Canada were randomized to two study groups. All caregivers received oral health counseling, while children in one group received FV twice per year and the controls received no varnish. A total of 1275, 6 months to 5-year-old children from the SLZ communities were enrolled. In addition, a convenience sample of 150 primarily non-Aboriginal children of the same age were recruited from the neighboring community of Thunder Bay and used as comparisons. Longitudinal examinations for the dmft/s indices were conducted by calibrated hygienists in 2003, 2004 and 2005.
Aboriginal children living in the SLZ or in Thunder Bay had significantly higher caries prevalence and severity than non-Aboriginal children in Thunder Bay. FV treatment conferred an 18% reduction in the 2-year mean 'net' dmfs increment for Aboriginal children and a 25% reduction for all children, using cluster analysis to adjust for the intra-cluster correlation among children in the same community. Adjusted odds ratio for caries incidence was 1.96 times higher in the controls than in the FV group (95% CI = 1.08-3.56; P = 0.027). For those caries-free at baseline, the number (of children) needed to treat (NNT) equaled 7.4.
Findings support the use of FV at least twice per year, in conjunction with caregiver counseling, to prevent ECC, reduce caries increment and oral health inequalities between young Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children.
PubMed ID
18422711 View in PubMed
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[90 Strontium in milk-teeth, diet and bones. A comparative study of levels in Denmark, Faeroe Islands and Greenland]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44580
Source
Nord Med. 1968 Feb 29;79(9):280-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-29-1968

[Acute dental trauma in children (a structural statistical analysis)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234283
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1988 Jan-Feb;67(1):62-4
Publication Type
Article

Age estimation in small children: reference values based on counts of deciduous teeth in Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198357
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2000 Jun 5;110(3):179-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-2000
Author
M. Nyström
L. Peck
E. Kleemola-Kujala
M. Evälahti
M. Kataja
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, P.O. Box 41, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland. marjatta.nystrom@helsinki.fi
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2000 Jun 5;110(3):179-88
Date
Jun-5-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Determination by Teeth
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Reference Values
Tooth Eruption
Tooth, Deciduous
Abstract
The eruption of teeth in the mouth is suitable for age estimations during the period when teeth are actively emerging, in the deciduous dentition phase approximately from the age of 6 months to 2.5 years. Estimations of age can be performed simply by counting the number of teeth in the mouth. Reliability of the estimates depends on the reference data available and each population group should preferably have its own standards. In the present study timing of eruption of successive deciduous teeth was studied longitudinally in 129 Finns. The dates of clinical eruption of deciduous teeth were recorded by mothers and checked by dentists. In 40 of the 129 children emergence ages of at the most the four last teeth were based only on semiannual registrations performed by dentists. The main purpose was to provide normal timetables of tooth eruption in small children in forms that are practical in estimations of dental age. No sexual dimorphism existed in the timing of clinical eruption of successive deciduous teeth. The mean age corresponding to the presence of one tooth in the mouth was 7.1 months (S.D.=1.78) and that corresponding to tooth count 19 was 27.8 months (S.D.=3.99). If the chronological age is known, the presented distributions and means with variations make it possible to estimate the degree of advancement or delay in a child's dental development. If the age of the child is not known, the mean and median ages can be used for estimations of chronological age. However, estimations of age should not be based only on tooth counts because of marked variation also within this homogeneous group.
PubMed ID
10842029 View in PubMed
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Aluminum concentration in deciduous teeth is dependent on tooth type and dental status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31742
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Dec;59(6):356-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
A. Halling
O. Löfman
A R Nosratabadi
C. Tagesson
B. Oster
Author Affiliation
Unit of Community Dentistry, Center for Public Health Sciences, and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Sweden. Arne.Halling@lio.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Dec;59(6):356-60
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - analysis
Analysis of Variance
Child
Dental Caries - metabolism
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Molar - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Statistics, nonparametric
Time Factors
Tooth Root - chemistry
Tooth, Deciduous - chemistry
Abstract
Aluminum (Al) concentration was assessed in deciduous teeth in relation to sex, year of birth, tooth type, and the presence of caries and roots. Three hundred and twenty-three deciduous teeth from children born during the period 1952 93 in a county in southeast Sweden were sampled, and the Al content determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The arithmetic mean of the Al concentration was 0.58 +/- 0.64 ppm dry weight (mean +/- standard deviation) and differed significantly between incisors (1.05 +/- 1.04 ppm) and canines (0.48 +/- 0.50 ppm) and between incisors and molars (0.53 +/- 0.55 ppm). A significant difference was found between teeth with and without caries. No significant differences were found between sexes. The Al concentration correlated significantly with tooth weight for incisors (r = -0.47) and canines (r = -0.45) but not for molars (r = 0.03). No significant change in Al concentration was found over time. Caries-free deciduous molars are suggested as the most useful teeth for biological monitoring of aluminum.
PubMed ID
11831484 View in PubMed
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An enigmatic hypoplastic defect of the deciduous canine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237799
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1986 Jan;69(1):59-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1986
Author
M F Skinner
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1986 Jan;69(1):59-69
Date
Jan-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Cuspid - abnormalities
Dental Enamel Hypoplasia - epidemiology
Fossils
History, Ancient
Humans
India
Paleodontology
Tooth, Deciduous - abnormalities
Abstract
A roughly circular hypoplastic defect restricted to the labial enamel surface of the deciduous canine is described. This pathology is quite common in available samples of Upper Paleolithic and Neolithic children and a cadaver sample of recent Calcuttans, affecting 44% to 70% of individuals. It is rare in a Neanderthal sample and in children from a clinical practice in Vancouver. The lesion occurs twice as commonly in the lower jaw. The defect appears to commence at or after birth owing to localized pressure on thin or nonexistent alveolar bone overlying the bulging crypt of the deciduous canine. Population differences in the incidence of the pathology probably reflect innate and acquired variation in hard and soft tissue thicknesses in this region.
PubMed ID
3511731 View in PubMed
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[An epidemiological study of caries in Dental Service District patients]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43522
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1973 Jan;83(1):2-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1973

[An epidemiological study of caries in Gloppen dental district, Sogn and Fjordane]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43521
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1973 Jan;83(1):7-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1973

[An epidemiologic investigation of the occurrence of caries, plaque and gingivitis in children going to kindergarten in Horsholm Community]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43592
Source
Tandlaegebladet. 1972 Jul;76(7):626-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1972

279 records – page 1 of 28.