Skip header and navigation

Refine By

28 records – page 1 of 3.

Assessment of clinical features predicting streptococcal pharyngitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36410
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(2):177-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
E. Meland
A. Digranes
R. Skjaerven
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Gade Institute, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(2):177-83
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Humans
Infant
Norway - epidemiology
Pharyngitis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Probability
Sensitivity and specificity
Streptococcal Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Tonsillitis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
A total of 133 patients who consulted 4 general practitioners in Bergen 1988/89 for sore throat were examined. 8 clinical parameters with expected predictive value for identifying streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis were recorded. Clinical examination was validated against bacteriologic examination at a microbiological laboratory. The prevalence of streptococcal infection (group A, C and G) was 29%. An algorithm was constructed which identifies 3 groups with varying probabilities of streptococcal infection. A positive predictive value of 62% in the group with highest prevalence and a negative predictive value of 90% in the group with lowest prevalence was found. The consequences of performing a confirmative test only on patients in the group with uncertain prediction for streptococcal disease was elaborated. Although slightly reduced accuracy was demonstrated, due to diminished sensitivity, selective testing is recommended. Another algorithm was constructed for use in situations where no confirmative testing is available. The positive predictive value in the group with highest probability of streptococcal infection was 51%, and the negative predictive value in the group with lowest probability was 84%.
PubMed ID
8511511 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Chronic tonsillitis in the students of a humanitarian higher school: incidence, diagnostics, and therapeutic strategies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108446
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2013;(3):48-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
N L Kunel'skaia
L Iu Skriabina
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2013;(3):48-51
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Russia - epidemiology
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Student Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Tonsillitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of the present work was to study peculiar features of the nosological structure of chronic ENT pathology in the applicants and students of a higher education institution and perform a thorough analysis of the prevalence of various forms of chronic pharyngeal diseases. The study was based at the Polyclinic of Moscow State Institute of International Relations, Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and lasted from 1998 to 2011. A total of 42 829 subjects aged between 15-30 years were examined including 32 186 applicants undergoing physical qualification by the medical evaluation board and 10 643 students subjected to routine annual medical examination. The latter group was characterized by the high prevalence of chronic ENT diseases predominated by pharyngeal pathology (39.6-59.8%). Chronic pharyngeal pathology was prevailed by chronic tonsillitis (32.7-50.6%) followed in the descending order by chronic pharyngitis (16.9-25.2%), papillomas affecting the soft palate, palatine arches and tonsils (0.8-1.5%), and adenoid vegetations (0.05-0.4%). It is concluded that regular medical check-up and treatment provide an effective tool for the prevention of CT progression and the development of its complications in the young subjects. 93.81% of the students were removed from dispensary observation due to improvement of health conditions or recovery. It is concluded that the surgical treatment of CT (bilateral tonsillectomy) should be more extensively applied in the absence of the desired effect of its conservative therapy.
PubMed ID
23887375 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differences in antibiotic prescribing patterns between general practitioners in Scandinavia: a questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31381
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(8):602-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Inga Odenholt
Anita Bylander-Groth
Niels Frimodt-Möller
Kirsten Skinlo Rokstad
Sigvard Mölstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. inga.odenholt@inf.mas.lu.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(8):602-9
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bronchitis
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Drug Utilization - standards - trends
Family Practice - standards - trends
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Norway
Otitis Media - diagnosis - drug therapy
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - trends
Physicians, Family
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sinusitis - diagnosis - drug therapy
Sweden
Tonsillitis - diagnosis - drug therapy
Urinary Tract Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Abstract
There has been a dramatic increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria worldwide. In the Scandinavian countries at least 90% of total antibiotic use relates to outpatients and therefore it has become increasingly important to know the antibiotic prescription pattern of general practitioners (GPs) in order to implement and monitor changes in antibiotic prescribing. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prescription patterns of GPs in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. In order to achieve a reasonable comparison, a questionnaire consisting of 7 case reports concerning upper and lower respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections and skin and soft tissue infections was sent to 1,000 GPs in the 3 countries. In general, the guidelines for the treatment of bacterial infections in the individual countries were followed by the responders. In all 3 countries, penicillin V was still the drug most frequently used in upper and lower respiratory tract infections. The greatest difference in prescribing patterns among the countries was seen in the treatment of urinary tract infections, recurrent pharyngeal tonsillitis, acute otitis media and acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis. There were also differences in the dosing regimens, length of treatment and use of diagnostic techniques.
PubMed ID
12238578 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Differential diagnosis of early tuberculosis infection, the primary complex and bronchoadenitis in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43664
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1972 Mar-Apr;(2):11-2
Publication Type
Article

[Dispensarization of patients with rheumatism and chronic tonsillitis in a rural medical district].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251205
Source
Vopr Revm. 1976 Apr-Jun;(2):58-9
Publication Type
Article
Source
Br Med J. 1971 Dec 11;4(5788):660-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-1971
Author
A. Bro-Jorgensen
T. Jensen
Source
Br Med J. 1971 Dec 11;4(5788):660-1
Date
Dec-11-1971
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - administration & dosage
Complement Fixation Tests
Denmark
Ethnic Groups
Female
Gonorrhea - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - isolation & purification
Palatine Tonsil - microbiology
Penicillin G - therapeutic use
Probenecid - administration & dosage
Sexual Behavior
Tetracycline - therapeutic use
Tonsillitis - diagnosis - drug therapy - etiology - microbiology
Abstract
Neisseria gonorrhoeae were cultured from tonsillar swabs in six men and six women out of 161 consecutive, unselected, Danish patients (95 men and 66 women) suffering from urogenital or rectal gonorrhoea. Gonococci were found in the tonsils in only one out of 49 foreign men with gonorrhoea. Eleven of the Danish patients admitted orogenital contact at their most recent intercourse. The gonococcal complement fixation test was negative in all except two cases. Standard singledose treatment cured the urogenital and rectal infections promptly but failed to cure the tonsillar infection in five cases, and in recalcitrant cases the organisms were demonstrable for some months.
Notes
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1971 Apr;47(2):144-55574737
Cites: Lakartidningen. 1971 Feb 3;68(6):569-715101470
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1970 Aug;73(2):267-94989317
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1969 Sep;45(3):228-314981353
Cites: JAMA. 1969 Oct 13;210(2):315-74980782
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1967 Jun 1;276(22):1248-505337413
Cites: Acta Derm Venereol. 1961;41:324-713747992
PubMed ID
5002598 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Hyperdiagnosis of rheumatism in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43330
Source
Pediatriia. 1973 Mar;52(3):7-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1973

28 records – page 1 of 3.