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131 records – page 1 of 14.

(18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography after one cycle of chemotherapy in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: results of a Nordic/US intergroup study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272653
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2015 Jul;56(7):2005-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Karen Juul Mylam
Lale Kostakoglu
Martin Hutchings
Morton Coleman
Dominick Lamonica
Myron S Czuczman
Louis F Diehl
Anne L Nielsen
Paw Jensen
Annika Loft
Helle W Hendel
Victor Iyer
Sirpa Leppä
Sirkku Jyrkkiö
Harald Holte
Mikael Eriksson
Dorte Gillstrøm
Per B Hansen
Marko Seppänen
Karin Hjorthaug
Peter de Nully Brown
Lars M Pedersen
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2015 Jul;56(7):2005-12
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Denmark
Female
Finland
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - pharmacokinetics
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse - drug therapy - mortality - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Multimodal Imaging
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Radiopharmaceuticals - pharmacokinetics
Survival Rate
Sweden
Tissue Distribution
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
We evaluated the predictive value of interim positon emission tomography (I-PET) after one course of chemoimmunotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). One hundred and twelve patients with DLBCL were enrolled. All patients had PET/computed tomography (CT) scans performed after one course of chemotherapy (PET-1). I-PET scans were categorized according to International Harmonization Project criteria (IHP), Deauville 5-point scale (D 5PS) with scores 1-3 considered negative (D 5PS > 3) and D 5PS with scores 1-4 considered negative (D 5PS = 5). Ratios of tumor maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) to liver SUVmax were also analyzed. We found no difference in progression-free survival (PFS) between PET-negative and PET-positive patients according to IHP and D 5PS > 3. The 2-year PFS using D 5PS = 5 was 50.9% in the PET-positive group and 84.8% in the PET-negative group (p = 0.002). A tumor/liver SUVmax cut-off of 3.1 to distinguish D 5PS scores of 4 and 5 provided the best prognostic value. PET after one course of chemotherapy was not able to safely discriminate PET-positive and PET-negative patients in different prognostic groups.
PubMed ID
25330442 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score during the first 3 hours of middle cerebral artery stroke: comparison of noncontrast CT, CT angiography source images, and CT perfusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158816
Source
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2008 May;29(5):931-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
K. Lin
O. Rapalino
M. Law
J S Babb
K A Siller
B K Pramanik
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. kelinmd@gmail.com
Source
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2008 May;29(5):931-6
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Cerebral Angiography - methods
Contrast Media
Female
Humans
Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Abstract
The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) is a reliable method of delineating the extent of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke. Our aim was to retrospectively compare the accuracy of ASPECTS on noncontrast CT, CT angiography (CTA) source images, and CT perfusion maps of cerebral blood volume (CBV) during the first 3 hours of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke.
First-time patients with MCA stroke who presented
PubMed ID
18272553 View in PubMed
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The Accuracy of the Computed Tomography Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis: Does the Experience of the Radiologist Matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294920
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-2018
Author
E Lietzén
P Salminen
I Rinta-Kiikka
H Paajanen
T Rautio
P Nordström
M Aarnio
T Rantanen
J Sand
J-P Mecklin
A Jartti
J Virtanen
P Ohtonen
N Ånäs
J M Grönroos
Author Affiliation
1 Division of Digestive Surgery and Urology, Department of Acute and Digestive Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Appendectomy - methods
Appendicitis - diagnostic imaging - drug therapy - surgery
Clinical Competence
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Radiologists
Risk assessment
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis with a special reference to radiologist experience.
Data were collected prospectively in our randomized controlled trial comparing surgery and antibiotic treatment for uncomplicated acute appendicitis (APPAC trial, NCT01022567). We evaluated 1065 patients who underwent computed tomography for suspected appendicitis. The on-call radiologist preoperatively analyzed these computed tomography images. In this study, the radiologists were divided into experienced (consultants) and inexperienced (residents) ones, and the comparison of interpretations was made between these two radiologist groups.
Out of the 1065 patients, 714 had acute appendicitis and 351 had other or no diagnosis on computed tomography. There were 700 true-positive, 327 true-negative, 14 false-positive, and 24 false-negative cases. The sensitivity and the specificity of computed tomography were 96.7% (95% confidence interval, 95.1-97.8) and 95.9% (95% confidence interval, 93.2-97.5), respectively. The rate of false computed tomography diagnosis was 4.2% for experienced consultant radiologists and 2.2% for inexperienced resident radiologists (p?=?0.071). Thus, the experience of the radiologist had no effect on the accuracy of computed tomography diagnosis.
The accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis was high. The experience of the radiologist did not improve the diagnostic accuracy. The results emphasize the role of computed tomography as an accurate modality in daily routine diagnostics for acute appendicitis in all clinical emergency settings.
PubMed ID
28929862 View in PubMed
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Acetabular fracture assessment in four different pelvic trauma centers: have the Judet views become superfluous?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269564
Source
Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2015 Jul;135(7):913-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
John Clarke-Jenssen
Stein Arne Øvre
Olav Røise
Jan Erik Madsen
Source
Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2015 Jul;135(7):913-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetabulum - injuries - radiography
Adult
Female
Hip Fractures - radiography
Humans
Male
Norway
Observer Variation
Predictive value of tests
Reproducibility of Results
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods - standards
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study was designed to examine whether oblique radiographs (Judet views) in addition to 2D and 3D CT scans improved the intra- and interobserver reliability when assessing acetabular fractures.
Four international orthopedic pelvic trauma centers reviewed the radiological images for 20 acetabular fracture patients. Three different image sets were made; one set containing plain radiographs including oblique (Judet) views and 2D axial CT scans. The second set contained an AP radiograph of the pelvis, without oblique views, 2D and 3D CT scans. The third set contained all the images. The image sets were evaluated in three separate sessions, for each session the raters were asked to classify the fracture according to Letournel, as well as record a number of other important radiological features concerning the fracture.
The interobserver agreement for the Letournel classification was found to be moderate for all image sets. The image set without oblique views showed the best agreement with a kappa value of 0.60. The intra- and interobserver agreement for important modifiers were found to be substantial. The addition of oblique radiographs did not seem to increase the intra- or interobserver agreement for any of the factors evaluated except for the roof arc score.
The moderate agreement found for the Letournel classification is to be expected given the complexity of the classification. The addition of oblique radiographs to the image sets does not seem to improve the reliability and thus its routine use for classification and decision making may be debated.
PubMed ID
25931251 View in PubMed
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Adrenal lesion frequency: A prospective, cross-sectional CT study in a defined region, including systematic re-evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139870
Source
Acta Radiol. 2010 Dec;51(10):1149-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Lilian Hammarstedt
Andreas Muth
Bo Wängberg
Lena Björneld
Helga A Sigurjónsdóttir
Galina Götherström
Erik Almqvist
Håkan Widell
Sture Carlsson
Stefan Ander
Mikael Hellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. lilian.hammarstedt@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Radiol. 2010 Dec;51(10):1149-56
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiography
Adrenal Glands - radiography
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidental Findings
Male
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Abstract
incidentally detected adrenal lesions have become a growing clinical problem.
to prospectively estimate and validate the prevalence of incidentally detected adrenal lesions (adrenal incidentaloma) in patients with or without malignant disease undergoing CT.
during 18 months all adult patients with incidentally discovered adrenal lesions detected at CT were prospectively reported from the radiology departments of all hospitals in Western Sweden (1.66 million inhabitants). Frequencies of adrenal lesions initially reported at CT and at a systematic re-evaluation were compared. The interobserver variation in blindly assessing adrenal lesions was also analyzed.
adrenal lesions were reported and verified in 339 patients (193 females; mean age 69 years, range 30-94 years). Mean lesion size was 25.8 mm (range 8-94 mm). The mean frequency of originally reported adrenal lesions was 0.9% (range 0-2.4% between hospitals). The systematic re-evaluation of 3801 randomly selected cases showed a mean frequency of 4.5% (range 1.8-7.1% between hospitals). The re-evaluation revealed 177 cases with adrenal lesions, 30% of these were submitted by the local radiologist in accordance with the study design, 23% were described in the local radiology report but not submitted to the study center, while 47% were neither locally reported nor submitted.
adrenal lesions are under-reported in clinical practice. Prevalence figures for adrenal incidentalomas should therefore be interpreted with caution, especially in multi-center settings.
PubMed ID
20969508 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score in clinical practice: what have we learned?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148474
Source
Int J Stroke. 2009 Oct;4(5):354-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
V. Puetz
I. Dzialowski
M D Hill
A M Demchuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Dresden University Stroke Centre, University of Technology Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
Source
Int J Stroke. 2009 Oct;4(5):354-64
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Brain Ischemia - drug therapy - radiography
Cerebral Angiography - methods
Humans
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Reproducibility of Results
Stroke - drug therapy - physiopathology - radiography
Thrombolytic Therapy - adverse effects
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Abstract
The introduction of brain imaging with computed tomography revolutionised the treatment of patients with acute ischaemic stroke. With the visual differentiation of haemorrhagic stroke from ischaemic stroke, thrombolytic therapy became feasible. The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score was devised to quantify the extent of early ischaemic changes in the middle cerebral artery territory on noncontrast computed tomography. With its systematic approach, the score is simple and reliable. However, the assessment of early ischaemic changes and Alberta Stroke Program Early CT scoring require training. The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score is a strong predictor of functional outcome. Furthermore, the effectiveness of intraarterial thrombolysis in patients with middle cerebral artery occlusion shows effect modification by the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score. This review summarises the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score methodology. We illustrate current knowledge regarding Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score applied to clinical trials and comment on how Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score may facilitate clinical treatment decision making and future trial design. Moreover, we introduce a modification of the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score methodology that disregards isolated cortical swelling, i.e. focal brain swelling without associated parenchymal hypoattenuation, as early ischaemic changes in the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score system.
PubMed ID
19765124 View in PubMed
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Algorithm for head computed tomography imaging in patients with mandible fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154766
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2008 Oct;66(10):2093-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Marcin Czerwinski
Wendy L Parker
H Bruce Williams
Author Affiliation
Division of Plastic Surgery, McGill University Health Sciences Center, McGill University, Montreal Children's Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. marcin.czerwinski@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2008 Oct;66(10):2093-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Algorithms
Brain Injuries - etiology - radiography
Canada
Female
Glasgow Coma Scale
Head - radiography
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mandibular Fractures - complications - radiography
Maxillofacial Injuries
Middle Aged
Multiple Trauma
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Unconsciousness
Vomiting
Abstract
Trauma to the mandible can potentially increase our predictive accuracy for intracranial injuries (ICIs) because of the mandible's strength, anatomic proximity, and direct connection to the skull base. Our goals were to: 1) investigate the association of mandible fractures with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and intracranial lesions (ICLs); and 2) determine predictors of ICIs in a level 1 Canadian trauma center with distinct patient demographics and fracture etiologies.
A retrospective chart review was performed of medical records of mandible-fracture patients treated at our institution from 1997 to 2003. Patients who had undergone postinjury computed tomography (CT) of the head with a minimum of 4 weeks' follow-up were considered eligible. Data collected included patient and fracture characteristics, neurologic evaluation, and the presence of concomitant injuries.
One hundred eighty-one patients were reviewed, of whom 86 were found eligible, with demographics representative of an urban-trauma population. The incidence of TBI was 68.6%, and of ICLs, 27%. Logistic regression identified alcohol (odds ratio [OR], 3.97), concomitant facial fracture (OR, 2.77), and other systemic injury (OR, 2.59) as independent predictors of an ICI in mandibular fracture patients. Importantly, ICIs were observed in 19% of mandible-fracture patients, satisfying the criteria for mild TBI, and in 17% of patients without any evidence of TBI.
Some authors have advocated treating mandible fractures on an outpatient basis, with a focused workup. Our results of significant concomitant ICI in mandible-fracture patients, conversely, suggest that such management may inadvertently result in the oversight of potentially life-threatening injuries. Thus, we recommend mandatory intracranial CT imaging if the patient's neurologic status at time of injury is unknown or meets the criteria of TBI, or if positive predictors for ICL are present.
PubMed ID
18848107 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of lethal outcomes in patients with newly-diagnosed tuberculosis of the respiratory organs in combination with HIV-infection].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127237
Source
Ter Arkh. 2011;83(11):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
V N Zimina
A V Kravchenko
Iu R Ziuzia
F A Batyrov
A A Popova
G V Klimov
Iu G Parkhomenko
I A Vasil'eva
Source
Ter Arkh. 2011;83(11):25-31
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autopsy
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Female
HIV Infections - complications - mortality
Humans
Male
Microscopy
Moscow
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - isolation & purification
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Tuberculosis, Lymph Node - diagnosis
Tuberculosis, Miliary - diagnosis
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - mortality
Abstract
To analyse lethal outcomes in patients with newly-diagnosed respiratory tuberculosis comorbid with HIV-infection depending on initial count of CD4+ lymphocytes.
Of 304 HIV patients with newly-diagnosed tuberculosis treated in Moscow Tubercusis Hospital N 7 in 2006-2010, 40 (13.2%) patients died. Tuberculosis diagnosis was made after detection of M. tuberculosis (MT) by different tests, MT DNA in different biological material, histological verification or by effectiveness of specific antituberculous therapy. Postmortem examinations were made according to the protocol.
Significant differences were detected in patients with initial count of CD4+ lymphocytes less than 50 in 1 mcl. Specific CNS affection was found in patients with initial lymphocyte count CD4+ less than 100 in 1 mcl. Most of autopsy examinations registered generalized acutely progressive tuberculosis with multiple lesions of internal organs and lymph nodes (LN). Microscopy revealed obscure morphological picture of specific inflammation with prevalence of alternative-exudative tissue reactions in the absence of a productive inflammation component. Cases with submiliary dissemination which was invisible in macroscopic examination due to a bright picture of exudative tissue reaction (rare plethora of the lungs, alveolar and interstitial edema, perifocal inflammatory reaction of nonspecific reactive nature) and small size of the lesions. The comparison of clinical and autopsy diagnoses revealed that involvement of intrathoracic LN and miliary dissemination, according to autopsy, occurred much more frequently than shown by antemortem standard x-ray examination of the chest.
It is strongly recommended to perform computed tomography of the chest in all HIV-infected patients with long-term fever but without visible alterations on chest x-ray.
PubMed ID
22312880 View in PubMed
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Assessment of incident spine and hip fractures in women and men using finite element analysis of CT scans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256993
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Mar;29(3):570-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
David L Kopperdahl
Thor Aspelund
Paul F Hoffmann
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Kristin Siggeirsdottir
Tamara B Harris
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tony M Keaveny
Author Affiliation
O.N. Diagnostics, Berkeley, CA, USA.
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Mar;29(3):570-80
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bone Density
Female
Finite Element Analysis
Hip Fractures - radiography
Humans
Male
Spinal Fractures - radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Abstract
Finite element analysis of computed tomography (CT) scans provides noninvasive estimates of bone strength at the spine and hip. To further validate such estimates clinically, we performed a 5-year case-control study of 1110 women and men over age 65 years from the AGES-Reykjavik cohort (case?=?incident spine or hip fracture; control?=?no incident spine or hip fracture). From the baseline CT scans, we measured femoral and vertebral strength, as well as bone mineral density (BMD) at the hip (areal BMD only) and lumbar spine (trabecular volumetric BMD only). We found that for incident radiographically confirmed spine fractures (n?=?167), the age-adjusted odds ratio for vertebral strength was significant for women (2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8 to 4.3) and men (2.2, 95% CI 1.5 to 3.2) and for men remained significant (p?=?0.01) independent of vertebral trabecular volumetric BMD. For incident hip fractures (n?=?171), the age-adjusted odds ratio for femoral strength was significant for women (4.2, 95% CI 2.6 to 6.9) and men (3.5, 95% CI 2.3 to 5.3) and remained significant after adjusting for femoral neck areal BMD in women and for total hip areal BMD in both sexes; fracture classification improved for women by combining femoral strength with femoral neck areal BMD (p?=?0.002). For both sexes, the probabilities of spine and hip fractures were similarly high at the BMD-based interventional thresholds for osteoporosis and at corresponding preestablished thresholds for "fragile bone strength" (spine: women = 4500?N, men = 6500?N; hip: women = 3000?N, men = 3500?N). Because it is well established that individuals over age 65 years who have osteoporosis at the hip or spine by BMD criteria should be considered at high risk of fracture, these results indicate that individuals who have fragile bone strength at the hip or spine should also be considered at high risk of fracture.
PubMed ID
23956027 View in PubMed
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Atherosclerosis imaging and the Canadian Atherosclerosis Imaging Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118012
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Mar;29(3):297-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Jean-Claude Tardif
J David Spence
Therese M Heinonen
Alan Moody
Josephine Pressacco
Richard Frayne
Philippe L'allier
Benjamin J W Chow
Matthias Friedrich
Sandra E Black
Aaron Fenster
Brian Rutt
Rob Beanlands
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. jean-claude.tardif@icm-mhi.org
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Mar;29(3):297-303
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Angiography - methods
Atherosclerosis - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Canada
Carotid Arteries - pathology - radiography - radionuclide imaging - ultrasonography
Contrast Media - diagnostic use
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Echocardiography, Three-Dimensional - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Multimodal Imaging - methods
Positron-Emission Tomography
Regression Analysis
Research Design
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Abstract
Atherosclerosis exacts a large toll on society in the form of cardiovascular morbidity, mortality, and resource use and is exacerbated by the epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Consequently, there is a critical need for more-effective methods of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of the complications of atherosclerosis. Careful and well-conducted large population studies are needed in order to truly understand the natural history of the disease, its imaging biomarkers, and their links to patient outcomes. The Canadian Atherosclerosis Imaging Network (CAIN) is a unique research network funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Canada Foundation for Innovation and designed to address these needs and to enable large population-based imaging studies. The central objective of CAIN is to move innovations in imaging toward their broad application in clinical research and clinical practice for the improved evaluation of cardiac and neurologic vascular disease. CAIN is established as an international resource for studying the natural history, progression, and regression of atherosclerosis, as well as novel therapeutic interventions aimed at atherosclerosis. The network represents Canada's leading atherosclerosis imaging experts, embodying both basic imaging science and clinical imaging research. The network is improving methods of detection and treatment of atherosclerosis and, through a better understanding of the underlying disease itself, improving strategies for disease prevention. The benefits are expected to appear in the next 2 to 3 years. CAIN will drive innovation in imaging technology within the field of cardiology and neurology and improve health outcomes in Canada and worldwide.
PubMed ID
23245557 View in PubMed
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131 records – page 1 of 14.