Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1215 records – page 1 of 122.

3D modeling-based surgical planning in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery--preliminary results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90794
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Raappana Antti
Koivukangas John
Pirilä Tapio
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. antti.raappana@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2008 Sep;128(9):1011-8
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - pathology - radiography - surgery
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Endoscopy - methods
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Neurological
Pituitary Neoplasms - pathology - radiography - surgery
Prospective Studies
Surgery, Computer-Assisted - methods
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Young Adult
Abstract
CONCLUSION: The preoperative three-dimensional (3D) modeling of the pituitary adenoma together with pituitary gland, optic nerves, carotid arteries, and the sphenoid sinuses was adopted for routine use in our institution for all pituitary surgery patients. It gave the surgeon a more profound orientation to the individual surgical field compared with the use of conventional 2D images only. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the feasibility of 3D surgical planning for pituitary adenoma surgery using readily available resources. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 40 consecutive patients with pituitary adenoma were used to construct 3D models to be used in preoperative planning and during the surgery. A freely available, open source program (3D Slicer) downloaded to a conventional personal computer (PC) was applied. RESULTS: The authors present a brief description of the 3D reconstruction-based surgical planning workflow. In addition to the preoperative planning the 3D model was used as a 'road map' during the operation. With the 3D model the surgeon was more confident when opening the sellar wall and when evacuating the tumor from areas in contact with vital structures than when using only conventional 2D images.
PubMed ID
19086197 View in PubMed
Less detail

[10 years of translabyrinthine surgery for acoustic neuroma in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26058
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Oct 19;149(43):2901-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1987

(18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography and bone scintigraphy for diagnosis of bone metastases in newly diagnosed, high-risk prostate cancer patients: study protocol for a multicentre, diagnostic test accuracy study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276760
Source
BMC Cancer. 2016;16:10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Randi F Fonager
Helle D Zacho
Niels C Langkilde
Lars J Petersen
Source
BMC Cancer. 2016;16:10
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Neoplasms - pathology - radiography
Denmark
Fluorine Radioisotopes - chemistry
Humans
Male
Multimodal Imaging
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Staging
Positron-Emission Tomography
Prostatic Neoplasms - pathology - radiography
Risk factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
For decades, planar bone scintigraphy has been the standard practice for detection of bone metastases in prostate cancer and has been endorsed by recent oncology/urology guidelines. It is a sensitive method with modest specificity. (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography has shown improved sensitivity and specificity over bone scintigraphy, but because of methodological issues such as retrospective design and verification bias, the existing level of evidence with (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography is limited. The primary objective is to compare the diagnostic properties of (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography versus bone scintigraphy on an individual patient basis.
One hundred forty consecutive, high-risk prostate cancer patients will be recruited from several hospitals in Denmark. Sample size was calculated using Hayen's method for diagnostic comparative studies. This study will be conducted in accordance with recommendations of standards for reporting diagnostic accuracy studies. Eligibility criteria comprise the following: 1) biopsy-proven prostate cancer, 2) PSA = 50 ng/ml (equals a prevalence of bone metastasis of ˜ 50% in the study population on bone scintigraphy), 3) patients must be eligible for androgen deprivation therapy, 4) no current or prior cancer (within the past 5 years), 5) ability to comply with imaging procedures, and 6) patients must not receive any investigational drugs. Planar bone scintigraphy and (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography will be performed within a window of 14 days at baseline. All scans will be repeated after 26 weeks of androgen deprivation therapy, and response of individual lesions will be used for diagnostic classification of the lesions on baseline imaging among responding patients. A response is defined as PSA normalisation or = 80% reduction compared with baseline levels, testosterone below castration levels, no skeletal related events, and no clinical signs of progression. Images are read by blinded nuclear medicine physicians. The protocol is currently recruiting.
To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the largest prospective studies comparing (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography and bone scintigraphy. It is conducted in full accordance with recommendations for diagnostic accuracy trials. It is intended to provide valid documentation for the use of (18)F-fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography for examination of bone metastasis in the staging of prostate cancer.
Notes
Cites: Eur Urol. 2014 Feb;65(2):467-7924321502
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2014 Oct;50(15):2519-3125139492
Cites: Nat Rev Cancer. 2005 Jan;5(1):21-815630412
Cites: Semin Nucl Med. 2001 Jan;31(1):28-4911200203
Cites: Cancer. 2003 Feb 1;97(3 Suppl):758-7112548573
Cites: Fam Pract. 2004 Feb;21(1):4-1014760036
Cites: Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2003 Dec;30(12):BP99-10614989222
Cites: Clin Invest Med. 1982;5(4):267-756819101
Cites: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1984 Apr;142(4):773-66230903
Cites: J Steroid Biochem. 1985 Nov;23(5B):833-412934579
Cites: Clin Nucl Med. 1990 Jul;15(7):485-72116949
Cites: J Nucl Med. 2006 Feb;47(2):287-9716455635
Cites: BMJ. 2008 May 17;336(7653):1106-1018483053
Cites: Lancet. 2008 May 17;371(9625):1710-2118486743
Cites: BJU Int. 2008 Dec;102(11):1531-819035858
Cites: Allergy. 2009 Aug;64(8):1109-1619489757
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Oct 20;101(8):1225-3219789531
Cites: J Natl Compr Canc Netw. 2010 Feb;8(2):14520141674
Cites: J Urol. 2010 Jul;184(1):162-720483155
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2010 Aug;63(8):883-9120079607
Cites: Nuklearmedizin. 2010;49(5):195-20120838734
Cites: J Nucl Med. 2010 Nov;51(11):1813-2021051652
Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2011 Jan 10;29(2):186-9121149653
Cites: Nucl Med Commun. 2011 Mar;32(3):168-7621076343
Cites: Eur Urol. 2011 Jan;59(1):61-7121056534
Cites: Nucl Med Commun. 2012 Apr;33(4):384-9422367858
Cites: Mol Imaging Biol. 2012 Apr;14(2):252-921479710
Cites: BMJ. 2012;345:e671723097549
Cites: J Nucl Med. 2013 Apr;54(4):590-923482667
Cites: Jpn J Radiol. 2013 Apr;31(4):262-923377765
Cites: Nucl Med Commun. 2013 Oct;34(10):935-4523903557
Cites: Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2014 Jan;41(1):59-6723974666
Cites: Clin Nucl Med. 2014 Jan;39(1):26-3124217537
Cites: Urol Oncol. 2014 Jan;32(1):38.e17-2823769268
Cites: BMJ. 2014;348:f752424401467
PubMed ID
26753880 View in PubMed
Less detail

(18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography after one cycle of chemotherapy in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: results of a Nordic/US intergroup study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272653
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2015 Jul;56(7):2005-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Karen Juul Mylam
Lale Kostakoglu
Martin Hutchings
Morton Coleman
Dominick Lamonica
Myron S Czuczman
Louis F Diehl
Anne L Nielsen
Paw Jensen
Annika Loft
Helle W Hendel
Victor Iyer
Sirpa Leppä
Sirkku Jyrkkiö
Harald Holte
Mikael Eriksson
Dorte Gillstrøm
Per B Hansen
Marko Seppänen
Karin Hjorthaug
Peter de Nully Brown
Lars M Pedersen
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2015 Jul;56(7):2005-12
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Denmark
Female
Finland
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - pharmacokinetics
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse - drug therapy - mortality - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Multimodal Imaging
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Radiopharmaceuticals - pharmacokinetics
Survival Rate
Sweden
Tissue Distribution
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
We evaluated the predictive value of interim positon emission tomography (I-PET) after one course of chemoimmunotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). One hundred and twelve patients with DLBCL were enrolled. All patients had PET/computed tomography (CT) scans performed after one course of chemotherapy (PET-1). I-PET scans were categorized according to International Harmonization Project criteria (IHP), Deauville 5-point scale (D 5PS) with scores 1-3 considered negative (D 5PS > 3) and D 5PS with scores 1-4 considered negative (D 5PS = 5). Ratios of tumor maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) to liver SUVmax were also analyzed. We found no difference in progression-free survival (PFS) between PET-negative and PET-positive patients according to IHP and D 5PS > 3. The 2-year PFS using D 5PS = 5 was 50.9% in the PET-positive group and 84.8% in the PET-negative group (p = 0.002). A tumor/liver SUVmax cut-off of 3.1 to distinguish D 5PS scores of 4 and 5 provided the best prognostic value. PET after one course of chemotherapy was not able to safely discriminate PET-positive and PET-negative patients in different prognostic groups.
PubMed ID
25330442 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 24-year follow-up of body mass index and cerebral atrophy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9325
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2004
Author
D. Gustafson
L. Lissner
C. Bengtsson
C. Björkelund
I. Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. deb.gustafson@neuro.gu.se
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1876-81
Date
Nov-23-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Atrophy
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cerebral Cortex - pathology - radiography
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the longitudinal relationship between body mass index (BMI), a major vascular risk factor, and cerebral atrophy, a marker of neurodegeneration, in a population-based sample of middle-aged women. METHODS: A representative sample of 290 women born in 1908, 1914, 1918, and 1922 was examined in 1968 to 1969, 1974 to 1975, 1980 to 1981, and 1992 to 1993 as part of the Population Study of Women in Göteborg, Sweden. At each examination, women completed a survey on a variety of health and lifestyle factors and underwent anthropometric, clinical, and neuropsychiatric assessments and blood collection. Atrophy of the temporal, frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes was measured on CT in 1992 when participants were age 70 to 84. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between BMI and brain measures. RESULTS: Women with atrophy of the temporal lobe were, on average, 1.1 to 1.5 kg/m2 higher in BMI at all examinations than women without temporal atrophy (p
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2005 Jun 14;64(11):1990-1; author reply 1990-115955971
SummaryForPatientsIn: Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):E19-2015557485
PubMed ID
15557505 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A 49 year old male with a giant pulmonary bulla--a case report and review of the literature]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91438
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Oct;94(10):673-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Asgeirsson Hilmar
Lúdvíksdóttir Dóra
Kjartansson Olafur
Gudbjartsson Tómas
Author Affiliation
Landspítala, Hringbraut, Reykjavik.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Oct;94(10):673-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blister - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Humans
Lung - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Lung Diseases - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy
Radiography, Thoracic
Spirometry
Thoracotomy
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A 49 year old previously healthy smoker was diagnosed with a giant bulla in his right lung, following a history of dry cough, repeated upper airway infections and increasing dyspnea for several years. Computed tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of a giant bulla in the right inferior lobe and several smaller bullae in the right superior lobe. The giant bulla was 17 cm in diameter, occupying more than half of the right hemithorax. On spirometry a moderate restrictive and a mild obstructive pattern was observed. Lung volume was measured with two different techniques, nitrogen washout and plethysmography, with volume of the bullae estimated at 2.9 L, similar to the 3.2 L determined by CT. The patient underwent thoracotomy, where the giant bulla together with the inferior lobe were removed with lobectomy and the small bullae in the superior lobe with wedge resection. Five months postoperatively the patient is in good health and is back at work. Postoperatively significant improvements in spirometry values and lung volume measurements have been documented. This case demonstrates that giant bullae can be successfully managed with surgical resection and their size can be determined by different techniques, including lung volume measurements and chest CT.
PubMed ID
18974430 View in PubMed
Less detail

The AAA with a challenging neck: outcome of open versus endovascular repair with standard and fenestrated stent-grafts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88967
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Chisci Emiliano
Kristmundsson Thorarinn
de Donato Gianmarco
Resch Timothy
Setacci Francesco
Sonesson Björn
Setacci Carlo
Malina Martin
Author Affiliation
Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Unit, University of Siena, Italy. e.chisci@gmail.com
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - radiography - surgery
Aortography - methods
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Female
Humans
Italy
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Stents
Sweden
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the outcome of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) versus conventional open repair (OR) in patients with a short, angulated or otherwise challenging proximal neck. METHODS: The definition of a challenging proximal neck was based on diameter (>or=28 mm), length (or=60 degrees ), shape (reverse tapered or bulging), and thrombus lining (>50%). Between January 2005 and December 2007, 187 consecutive patients (159 men; mean age 73 years, range 48-92) operated for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were identified as having challenging proximal neck morphology. Of these, 61 patients were treated with OR at center I (group A), 71 with standard EVAR (group B; 45 center I, 29 center II) and 52 with fenestrated EVAR (group C) at center II. Clinical examination and computed tomography were performed at 1 month and yearly thereafter. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between groups A, B, and C regarding primary technical success rate, 30-day mortality, or late AAA-related mortality. The mean length of follow-up was 19.5 months (range 0-40). Freedom from reintervention at 3 years was 91.8%, 79.7%, and 82.7% for groups A, B, and C, respectively (p = 0.042). The only statistically significant difference between standard and fenestrated EVAR was a higher incidence of late sac expansion [9 (12.2%) versus 1 (1.9%), p = 0.036] in the standard stent-graft group. Reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR (p = NS), but open reinterventions were more common after OR. Reinterventions after EVAR were related to the presence of an angulated (p = 0.039) or short neck (p = 0.024). CONCLUSION: The results of EVAR and OR were similar for AAAs with a challenging proximal neck. Endovascular reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR, particularly in patients with an angulated or short neck. Open reinterventions were more common after OR. More patients and long-term data are needed to confirm these findings.
Notes
Comment In: J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):147-819456195
PubMed ID
19456190 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abbreviated injury scale scoring in traffic fatalities: comparison of computerized tomography and autopsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146834
Source
J Trauma. 2010 Jun;68(6):1413-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Peter Mygind Leth
Marlene Ibsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. pleth@health.sdu.dk
Source
J Trauma. 2010 Jun;68(6):1413-6
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Autopsy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Forensic Medicine
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - radiography
Abstract
The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the value of postmortem computerized tomography (CT) for Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) scoring and Injury Severity Scoring (ISS) of traffic fatalities.
This is a prospective investigation of a consecutive series of 52 traffic fatalities from Southern Denmark that were CT scanned and autopsied. The AIS and ISS scores based on CT and autopsy (AU) were registered in a computer database and compared. Kappa values for reproducibility of AIS-severity scores and ISS scores were calculated.
On an average, there was a 94% agreement between AU and CT in detecting the presence or absence of lesions in the various anatomic regions, and the severity scores were the same in 90% of all cases (range, 75-100%). When different severity scoring was obtained, CT detected more lesions with a high severity score in the facial skeleton, pelvis, and extremities, whereas AU detected more lesions with high scores in the soft tissues (especially in the aorta), cranium, and ribs. The kappa value for reproducibility of AIS scores confirmed that the agreement between the two methods was good. The lowest kappa values (>0.6) were found for the facial skeleton, cerebellum, meninges, neck organs, lungs, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract. In these areas, the kappa value provided moderate agreement between CT and AU. For all other areas, there was a substantial agreement between the two methods. The ISS scores obtained by CT and by AU were calculated and were found to be with no or moderate variation in 85%. Rupture of the aorta was often overlooked by CT, resulting in too low ISS scoring.
The most precise postmortem AIS and ISS scorings of traffic fatalities was obtained by a combination of AU and CT. If it is not possible to perform an AU, then CT may be used as an acceptable alternative for AIS scoring. We have identified one important obstacle for postmortem ISS scoring, namely that aorta ruptures are not easily detected by post mortem CT.
PubMed ID
19996793 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal aortic embolization of a Figulla atrial septum occluder device, at the level of the celiac axis, after an atrial septal defect closure: hybrid attempt.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98185
Source
Vascular. 2010 Jan-Feb;18(1):59-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Kh Jahrome
Peter R Stella
Vanessa J Leijdekkers
Siyrous Hoseyni Guyomi
Frans L Moll
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. a.k.jahrome@umcutrecht.nl
Source
Vascular. 2010 Jan-Feb;18(1):59-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aorta, Abdominal - radiography - surgery
Aortic Diseases - etiology - radiography - therapy
Aortography - methods
Catheterization, Peripheral
Device Removal
Embolism - etiology - radiography - surgery - therapy
Female
Foreign-Body Migration - etiology - radiography - surgery - therapy
Heart Catheterization - adverse effects - instrumentation
Heart Septal Defects, Atrial - therapy
Humans
Septal Occluder Device
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Surgical Procedures
Abstract
A 41-year-old woman was treated with a Figulla (Occlutec, Helsingborg, Sweden) atrial septum occluder device with no intraprocedural complications. Five months later, dislocation of the device in the abdominal aorta was detected. The occluder device was located at the level of the celiac axis, nearly obstructing the entire aorta. Owing to total incorporation of the device, endoluminal retrieval was not possible. Through a medial rotation approach, the device was safely removed. This is a rare complication after endoluminal closure of an atrial septum defect. The retrieval possibilities are discussed.
PubMed ID
20122364 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal injuries in a low trauma volume hospital--a descriptive study from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264480
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Patrik Pekkari
Per-Olof Bylund
Hans Lindgren
Mikael Öman
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Disease Management
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitals, Low-Volume - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abdominal injuries occur relatively infrequently during trauma, and they rarely require surgical intervention. In this era of non-operative management of abdominal injuries, surgeons are seldom exposed to these patients. Consequently, surgeons may misinterpret the mechanism of injury, underestimate symptoms and radiologic findings, and delay definite treatment. Here, we determined the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic abdominal injuries at our hospital to provide a basis for identifying potential hazards in non-operative management of patients with these injuries in a low trauma volume hospital.
This retrospective study included prehospital and in-hospital assessments of 110 patients that received 147 abdominal injuries from an isolated abdominal trauma (n = 70 patients) or during multiple trauma (n = 40 patients). Patients were primarily treated at the University Hospital of Umeå from January 2000 to December 2009.
The median New Injury Severity Score was 9 (range: 1-57) for 147 abdominal injuries. Most patients (94%) received computed tomography (CT), but only 38% of patients with multiple trauma were diagnosed with CT
Notes
Cites: Curr Opin Pediatr. 2007 Jun;19(3):265-917505184
Cites: J Trauma. 2000 Apr;48(4):624-7; discussion 627-810780593
Cites: J Trauma. 2000 Jul;49(1):56-61; discussion 61-210912858
Cites: Injury. 2002 Sep;33(7):617-2612208066
Cites: Arch Surg. 2003 Aug;138(8):844-5112912742
Cites: Eur J Surg Suppl. 2003 Jul;(588):3-715200035
Cites: Am J Surg. 1995 Apr;169(4):442-547694987
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1997 Aug;32(8):1169-749269964
Cites: Ann Surg. 1998 May;227(5):708-17; discussion 717-99605662
Cites: J Trauma. 1999 May;46(5):920-610338413
Cites: Injury. 2005 Nov;36(11):1288-9216122752
Cites: Curr Opin Crit Care. 2007 Aug;13(4):399-40417599009
Cites: Injury. 2006 Dec;37(12):1143-5617092502
Cites: Injury. 2008 Jan;39(1):21-917996869
Cites: J Trauma. 2008 Mar;64(3):656-63; discussion 663-518332805
Cites: J Trauma. 2008 Apr;64(4):943-818404060
Cites: J Trauma. 2008 Jun;64(6):1472-718545111
Cites: Injury. 2008 Nov;39(11):1275-8918715559
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2009;17:2219439091
Cites: J Trauma. 2011 Mar;70(3):626-921610353
Cites: J Surg Educ. 2013 Jan-Feb;70(1):129-3723337682
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:6622985447
Cites: Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2013 May;95(4):241-523676806
Cites: J Surg Educ. 2013 Sep-Oct;70(5):618-2724016373
PubMed ID
25124882 View in PubMed
Less detail

1215 records – page 1 of 122.