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A cluster randomised controlled trial of an adolescent smoking cessation intervention: short and long-term effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127249
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Mar;40(2):167-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Peter Dalum
Georg Paludan-Müller
Gerda Engholm
Gerjo Kok
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Prevention & Documentation, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. pdal@si-folkesundhed.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Mar;40(2):167-76
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cluster analysis
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Program Evaluation
Self Efficacy
Smoking Cessation - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Tobacco Use Cessation - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a lack of effective smoking cessation interventions which have a high reach among adolescent smokers.
We conducted a randomised controlled trial of an adolescent smoking cessation intervention for students aged 15-21 at 22 continuation schools in Denmark. The intervention was a minimal intervention based on events with short counselling and a range of self-help materials. Our 1-month follow up consisted of 514 baseline daily smokers and the 14-month follow up of 369 daily smokers.
We found positive short-term effects regarding smoking cessation (adjusted OR 4.50, 95% CI 1.20-16.86), self-efficacy (p=0.01), and intentions to quit (p=0.004). However, none of these effects were maintained at 1-year follow up. The intervention was successful in reaching more than half of all daily smokers in the target group with more than 30% receiving counselling at least once in the intervention period.
This trial shows that a "minimal" intervention can produce short-term effects but that this approach is insufficient in producing long-term effects.
PubMed ID
22312032 View in PubMed
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Use of nicotine replacement therapy among Canadian youth: data from the 2006-2007 National Youth Smoking Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134512
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2011 Oct;13(10):1009-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Natasha E Lane
Scott T Leatherdale
Rashid Ahmed
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada.
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2011 Oct;13(10):1009-14
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Directive Counseling
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Nicotinic Agonists - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Tobacco Use Cessation - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Tobacco Use Cessation Products - utilization
Abstract
In Canada, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is a best practice for adult smoking cessation, but it is not recommended for use among youth smokers. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of NRT use among youth smokers in Canada and examine factors associated with its use.
Data from 41,886, Grade 9-12 students who participated in the 2006-2007 Youth Smoking Survey were used to determine prevalence of NRT use. Logistic regression models were conducted to examine the association between NRT use by smoking status, demographic characteristics, and exposure to tobacco control programs.
In 2006-2007, 20.4% of current and former youth smokers in Canada had ever used NRT and 7.4% were currently using NRT. Among ever and current NRT users, 17.7% and 23.7%, respectively, had never tried to quit smoking. Odds of NRT use were highest among current smokers, older youths, boys, youths who had made multiple quit attempts, and youths with no disposable income. Participation in cessation counseling was significantly associated with increased NRT use, whereas attending antismoking classes in school was inversely associated with using NRT.
A substantial number of Canadian youth use NRT, despite restrictions on its sale to this population. This study identifies characteristics associated with youths using NRT. Research is needed to elucidate mechanisms by which characteristics identified in this study affect NRT use. For example, it may be important to understand whether attending smoking cessation counseling induces NRT use in youths or vice versa.
PubMed ID
21571688 View in PubMed
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