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34 records – page 1 of 4.

[A government survey and program of the medical society: tobacco policy in the 1990's]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67907
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Sep 26;87(39):3041-2, 3047-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-26-1990

Air quality, mortality, and economic benefits of a smoke - free workplace law for non-smoking Ontario bar workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120430
Source
Indoor Air. 2013 Apr;23(2):93-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
J. Repace
B. Zhang
S J Bondy
N. Benowitz
R. Ferrence
Author Affiliation
Repace Associates Inc., Bowie 20720, MD, USA. repace@comcast.net
Source
Indoor Air. 2013 Apr;23(2):93-104
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cotinine - urine
Female
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Risk assessment
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We estimated the impact of a smoke-free workplace bylaw on non-smoking bar workers' health in Ontario, Canada. We measured bar workers' urine cotinine before (n = 99) and after (n = 91) a 2004 smoke-free workplace bylaw. Using pharmacokinetic and epidemiological models, we estimated workers' fine-particle (PM2.5 ) air pollution exposure and mortality risks from workplace secondhand smoke (SHS). workers' pre-law geometric mean cotinine was 10.3 ng/ml; post-law dose declined 70% to 3.10 ng/ml and reported work hours of exposure by 90%. Pre-law, 97% of workers' doses exceeded the 90th percentile for Canadians of working age. Pre-law-estimated 8-h average workplace PM2.5 exposure from SHS was 419 µg/m(3) or 'Very Poor' air quality, while outdoor PM2.5 levels averaged 7 µg/m(3) , 'Very Good' air quality by Canadian Air Quality Standards. We estimated that the bar workers' annual mortality rate from workplace SHS exposure was 102 deaths per 100000 persons. This was 2.4 times the occupational disease fatality rate for all Ontario workers. We estimated that half to two-thirds of the 10620 Ontario bar workers were non-smokers. Accordingly, Ontario's smoke-free law saved an estimated 5-7 non-smoking bar workers' lives annually, valued at CA $50 million to $68 million (US $49 million to $66 million).
PubMed ID
23006034 View in PubMed
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Anchorage clears the air. How Anchorage came to ban smoking in all buildings operated by city government including public schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3539
Source
Alaska Med. 1996 Jan-Mar;38(1):10-1
Publication Type
Article

[Application of tobacco smoking regulations in restaurants in Tromsö 1998]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67436
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 10;121(4):410-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-2001
Author
A. Emaus
M L Løchen
R. Høifødt
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin Universitetet i Tromsø 9037 Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 10;121(4):410-2
Date
Feb-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Questionnaires
Restaurants - legislation & jurisprudence
Smoking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Under the Norwegian Environmental Tobacco Smoke Act, a minimum of 50% of tables in restaurants have to be in smoke-free areas. The Ministry of Health and Social Affairs has defined "smoke-free restaurants" as a priority objective in its anti-tobacco strategy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We have investigated smoking policies in restaurants in the City of Tromsø in Northern Norway, as reported by restaurateurs in 1998. Representatives of all the 85 restaurants, bars and pubs in the city were interviewed and their smoking policies and habits reported. This study was part of the local health authority's evaluation of the degree of compliance with the legislation. RESULTS: In 71% of establishments, at least 50% of tables were smoke-free; in 88%, smoking areas were in compliance with the legislation. 86% of restaurateurs reported a positive or neutral attitude to the legislation, 80% thought that their guests were of the same opinion. 47% smoked every day; however, there was no association between smoking habits and smoking policies. INTERPRETATION: Though the prevalence of smoking was high among restaurateurs, this did not affect their attitudes towards the Environmental Tobacco Smoke Act or their policies on smoking.
PubMed ID
11255852 View in PubMed
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Association of anti-smoking legislation with rates of hospital admission for cardiovascular and respiratory conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144274
Source
CMAJ. 2010 May 18;182(8):761-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-18-2010
Author
Alisa Naiman
Richard H Glazier
Rahim Moineddin
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Ont. a.naiman@utoronto.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2010 May 18;182(8):761-7
Date
May-18-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Smoking - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Control, Formal
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Abstract
Few studies have examined the impact of anti-smoking legislation on respiratory or cardiovascular conditions other than acute myocardial infarction. We studied rates of hospital admission attributable to three cardiovascular conditions (acute myocardial infarction, angina, and stroke) and three respiratory conditions (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pneumonia or bronchitis) after the implementation of smoking bans.
We calculated crude rates of admission to hospital in Toronto, Ontario, from January 1996 (three years before the first phase of a smoking ban was implemented) to March 2006 (two years after the last phase was implemented. We used an autoregressive integrated moving-average (ARIMA) model to test for a relation between smoking bans and admission rates. We compared our results with similar data from two Ontario municipalities that did not have smoking bans and with conditions (acute cholecystitis, bowel obstruction and appendicitis) that are not known to be related to second-hand smoke.
Crude rates of admission to hospital because of cardiovascular conditions decreased by 39% (95% CI 38%-40%) and admissions because of respiratory conditions decreased by 33% (95% CI 32%-34%) during the ban period affecting restaurant settings. No consistent reductions in these rates were evident after smoking bans affecting other settings. No significant reductions were observed in control cities or for control conditions.
Our results serve to expand the list of health outcomes that may be ameliorated by smoking bans. Further research is needed to establish the types of settings in which smoking bans are most effective. Our results lend legitimacy to efforts to further reduce public exposure to tobacco smoke.
Notes
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Cites: Hum Exp Toxicol. 2001 Feb;20(2):61-8311327513
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Cites: Circulation. 2006 Oct 3;114(14):1490-617000911
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Cites: Prev Med. 2007 Jul;45(1):3-817482249
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2007 Nov;97(11):2035-917901438
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Mar 4;117(9):1183-818268149
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Cites: Am J Med. 2004 Feb 1;116(3):145-5014749157
Comment In: CMAJ. 2010 May 18;182(8):747-820385733
PubMed ID
20385737 View in PubMed
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Compliance with the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in Slovakia and in Finland: Two Different Worlds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304757
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 09 13; 17(18):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-13-2020
Author
Barbara Pavlikova
Lenka Freel
Jitse P van Dijk
Author Affiliation
Department of Labor Law and Social Security Law, Faculty of Law, Comenius University, 810 00 Bratislava, Slovakia.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 09 13; 17(18):
Date
09-13-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Drug and Narcotic Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Finland
Government Regulation
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
International Cooperation
Slovakia
Smoking - legislation & jurisprudence
Smoking Prevention
Tobacco
Tobacco Industry
Tobacco Products
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
World Health Organization
Abstract
The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) developed by the State Parties to the World Health Organization was ratified in Slovakia in 2004 and in Finland in 2005. The aim of this study was to explore and compare compliance with the FCTC in Finland and Slovakia. This is a two-country comparative study of tobacco control policy based on implementation of the FCTC in Slovakia and Finland. Compliance with the FCTC was measured similarly in Slovakia and Finland in terms of their institutional structure supporting a smoking free environment and implementation of selected articles of the FCTC. In Finland the responsibilities for anti-tobacco policy are clearly assigned. Slovakia does not have specifically responsible institutions. Finland has a clear plan for achieving the goal of a smoking-free country based on empirical evidence. Slovakia meets only the minimum standard resulting from its commitment as ratified in the FCTC and data are out of date or missing completely.
PubMed ID
32933121 View in PubMed
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The development and implementation of a revised municipal bylaw to control environmental tobacco smoke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221613
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Mar-Apr;84(2):118-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
L P Brigden
S H Peck
P. Coy
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Education, Capital Regional District Health, Victoria, B.C.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Mar-Apr;84(2):118-21
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Consumer Participation
Humans
Local Government
Politics
Program Development
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Relations
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Urban health
Abstract
A bylaw to regulate the contamination of the environment by tobacco smoke was introduced in the Capital Regional District, Victoria, British Columbia as of January 1st, 1991. This smoking control bylaw rigorously limits smoking in all public premises and restricts size, ventilation and location of designated smoking areas. As of January 1st, 1992 all workplaces in this area have become completely smoke-free. This paper describes the process of developing and implementing a municipal smoking control bylaw. Publicity is essential to raise awareness of the issue and to provide information. Engendering of political and public support and the adoption of an appropriate time line for introduction of the bylaw are also important components of the process. Legislation to control tobacco use has been shown to be an effective component of a comprehensive tobacco reduction strategy. Public health officials are urged to consider the implementation of similar policies to combat the health risks posed by environmental tobacco smoke.
PubMed ID
8334603 View in PubMed
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Do smoke-free car laws work? Evidence from a quasi-experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118490
Source
J Health Econ. 2013 Jan;32(1):138-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Hai V Nguyen
Author Affiliation
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 144 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3M2, Canada. vanhai.nguyen@utoronto.ca
Source
J Health Econ. 2013 Jan;32(1):138-48
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Automobiles - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Smoking - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
In response to increased risks of second-hand smoke exposure for children travelling in cars and its resulting deleterious health impacts, several jurisdictions passed legislation that bans smoking in private vehicles when children are present. In this study, I exploit a unique quasi-experiment from Canada and employ the difference-in-differences and triple-differences techniques to empirically evaluate this legislation. I find that the legislation reduces exposure to second-hand smoke inside cars for children. Further, there appears no marked increase in smoking at home after the implementation of the legislation.
PubMed ID
23202259 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.