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Addressing oral disease--the case for tobacco cessation services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194963
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Mar;67(3):141-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
H S Campbell
E H Simpson
T L Petty
P A Jennett
Author Affiliation
Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, Lyle S. Hallman Institute, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1. sharoncm@healthy.uwaterloo.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Mar;67(3):141-4
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dental Care
Goals
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Insurance Claim Reporting
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Periodontal Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Plants, Toxic
Referral and Consultation
Societies, Dental
Teaching Materials
Tobacco - adverse effects
Tobacco Use Cessation - methods
Abstract
There is strong scientific evidence from clinical and epidemiological studies that tobacco use, particularly cigarette smoking, is linked to periodontal disease as well as other serious but less common oral health diseases. Given the strength of this evidence, dentists must include tobacco cessation services (TCS) as part of their routine care. This paper describes barriers to the adoption of TCS as identified by Alberta dentists participating in a randomized intervention trial and discusses strategies for overcoming these barriers. As well, suggestions are made to professional associations and educational institutes on ways to increase the incorporation of tobacco cessation into professional practice standards.
Notes
Comment In: J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Mar;67(3):12711315384
PubMed ID
11315392 View in PubMed
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Cannabis, Tobacco, Alcohol Use, and the Risk of Early Stroke: A Population-Based Cohort Study of 45?000 Swedish Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282578
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):265-270
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Daniel Falkstedt
Valerie Wolff
Peter Allebeck
Tomas Hemmingsson
Anna-Karin Danielsson
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):265-270
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Cannabis - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys - methods
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco - adverse effects
Abstract
Current knowledge on cannabis use in relation to stroke is based almost exclusively on clinical reports. By using a population-based cohort, we aimed to find out whether there was an association between cannabis use and early-onset stroke, when accounting for the use of tobacco and alcohol.
The cohort comprises 49?321 Swedish men, born between 1949 and 1951, who were conscripted into compulsory military service between the ages of 18 and 20. All men answered 2 detailed questionnaires at conscription and were subject to examinations of physical aptitude, psychological functioning, and medical status. Information on stroke events up to ˜60 years of age was obtained from national databases; this includes strokes experienced before 45 years of age.
No associations between cannabis use in young adulthood and strokes experienced =45 years of age or beyond were found in multivariable models: cannabis use >50 times, hazard ratios=0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34-2.57) and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.59-1.53). Although an almost doubled risk of ischemic stroke was observed in those with cannabis use >50 times, this risk was attenuated when adjusted for tobacco usage: hazards ratio=1.47 (95% CI, 0.83-2.56). Smoking =20 cigarettes per day was clearly associated both with strokes before 45 years of age, hazards ratio=5.04 (95% CI, 2.80-9.06), and with strokes throughout the follow-up, hazards ratio=2.15 (95% CI, 1.61-2.88).
We found no evident association between cannabis use in young adulthood and stroke, including strokes before 45 years of age. Tobacco smoking, however, showed a clear, dose-response shaped association with stroke.
PubMed ID
28028147 View in PubMed
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CHRNA5-A3-B4 genetic variants alter nicotine intake and interact with tobacco use to influence body weight in Alaska Native tobacco users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113741
Source
Addiction. 2013 Oct;108(10):1818-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Andy Z X Zhu
Caroline C Renner
Dorothy K Hatsukami
Neal L Benowitz
Rachel F Tyndale
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Addiction. 2013 Oct;108(10):1818-28
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylases - blood
Body mass index
Body Weight - genetics
Cotinine - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nerve Tissue Proteins - genetics
Nicotine - chemistry - urine
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptors, Nicotinic - genetics
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Tobacco - adverse effects
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
Abstract
Gene variants in CHRNA5-A3-B4, which encode for the a5, a3 and ß4 nicotinic receptor subunits, are associated with altered smoking behaviors in European Americans. Little is known about CHRNA5-A3-B4 and its association with smoking behaviors and weight in Alaska Native people, which is a population with high prevalence but low levels of tobacco consumption, extensive smokeless tobacco use and high rates of obesity. We investigated CHRNA5-A3-B4 haplotype structure and its association with nicotine intake and obesity in Alaska Native people.
A cross-sectional study of 400 Alaska Native individuals, including 290 tobacco users.
CHRNA5-A3-B4 genotype, body weight and tobacco consumption biomarkers such as plasma cotinine and urinary total nicotine equivalents (TNE).
Alaska Native people have a distinct CHRNA5-A3-B4 haplotype structure compared with European/African Americans. In 290 Alaska Native tobacco users the 'G' allele of rs578776, which tagged a 30 kb haplotype in CHRNA5-A3-B4, was prevalent (16%) and associated significantly with nicotine intake (20% higher plasma cotinine, P
PubMed ID
23692359 View in PubMed
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Correlates of continued tobacco use and intention to quit smoking among Russian cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139307
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2011 Dec;18(4):325-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Robert A Schnoll
Somasundaram Subramanian
Elisa Martinez
Paul F Engstrom
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, 3535 Market Street, 4th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. schnoll@mail.med.upenn.edu
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2011 Dec;18(4):325-32
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Colorectal Neoplasms - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Tobacco - adverse effects
Abstract
Tobacco use among cancer patients is associated with adverse health outcomes. Little attention has been paid to tobacco use among cancer patients in developing countries, including Russia, where tobacco use is extremely high, and there is little public health infrastructure to address this issue.
This study examined medical, socio-demographic, and psychological correlates of smoking status and intention to quit smoking among newly diagnosed Russian cancer patients.
A cross-sectional study was conducted with 294 current or former smokers newly diagnosed with cancer.
Compared with patients who quit smoking, patients who continued to smoke were more likely to report urges to smoke to satisfy positive reinforcing aspects of tobacco use. Compared with patients who were smoking and reported no intention to quit smoking in the next 3 months, patients who were smoking but intended to quit smoking reported higher levels of perceived risks associated with continued smoking and higher levels of self-efficacy to quit smoking.
As commitment to developing smoking cessation treatment programs for cancer patients in Russia emerges, these data can help guide the development of behavioral interventions to assist patients with quitting smoking, enhancing their chances for improved clinical outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21076900 View in PubMed
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Does mortality risk of cigarette smoking depend on serum concentrations of persistent organic pollutants? Prospective investigation of the vasculature in Uppsala seniors (PIVUS) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259341
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e95937
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Duk-Hee Lee
Lars Lind
David R Jacobs
Samira Salihovic
Bert van Bavel
P Monica Lind
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(5):e95937
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Pesticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects - blood - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco - adverse effects
Abstract
Cigarette smoking is an important cause of preventable death globally, but associations between smoking and mortality vary substantially across country and calendar time. Although methodological biases have been discussed, it is biologically plausible that persistent organic pollutants (POPs) like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine (OC) pesticides can affect this association. This study was performed to evaluate if associations of cigarette smoking with mortality were modified by serum concentrations of PCBs and OC pesticides. We evaluated cigarette smoking in 111 total deaths among 986 men and women aged 70 years in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) with mean follow-up for 7.7 years. The association between cigarette smoking and total mortality depended on serum concentration of PCBs and OC pesticides (P value for interaction = 0.02). Among participants in the highest tertile of the serum POPs summary score, former and current smokers had 3.7 (95% CI, 1.5-9.3) and 6.4 (95% CI, 2.3-17.7) times higher mortality hazard, respectively, than never smokers. In contrast, the association between cigarette smoking and total mortality among participants in the lowest tertile of the serum POPs summary score was much weaker and statistically non-significant. The strong smoking-mortality association observed among elderly people with high POPs was mainly driven by low risk of mortality among never smokers with high POPs. As smoking is increasing in many low-income and middle-income countries and POPs contamination is a continuing problem in these areas, the interactions between these two important health-related issues should be considered in future research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24828407 View in PubMed
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Does tobacco smoke prevent atopic disorders? A study of two generations of Swedish residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15476
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2001 Jun;31(6):908-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
A. Hjern
A. Hedberg
B. Haglund
M. Rosén
Author Affiliation
Centre for Epidemiology, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden. anders.hjern@sos.se
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2001 Jun;31(6):908-14
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Health
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Plants, Toxic
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco - adverse effects
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have given conflicting results regarding the effect of exposure to tobacco smoke on atopic sensibilization. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of present and former smoking habits in relation to atopic disorders from data on 6909 young and middle-aged adults (16-49 years) and their 4472 children (3-15 years) from the Swedish Survey of Living Conditions in 1996-97. RESULTS: The prevalence of allergic asthma and allergic rhino-conjunctivitis decreased, in a dose-response manner (P = 0.03 and P = 0.004, respectively), with increasing exposure to tobacco smoke in the adult study population. This pattern was little changed when potential confounders (sex, age, education, domicile, country of birth) were entered into a multivariate analysis: the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for allergic rhino-conjunctivitis was 0.5 (0.4-0.7) for those who smoked at least 20 cigarettes a day and OR 0.7 (0.6-0.9) for those smoking 10-19 cigarettes, compared with those who reported that they never had smoked Former smokers had a tendency for a slightly lower risk: OR 0.9 (0.8-1.0). In a multivariate analysis, children of mothers who smoked at least 15 cigarettes a day tended to have lower odds for suffering from allergic rhino-conjunctivitis, allergic asthma, atopic eczema and food allergy, compared to children of mothers who had never smoked (ORs 0.6-0.7). Children of fathers who had smoked at least 15 cigarettes a day had a similar tendency (ORs 0.7-0.9). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates an association between current exposure to tobacco smoke and a low risk for atopic disorders in smokers themselves and a similar tendency in their children. There is a need for further studies with a prospective design to certify the causal direction of this association. Smoking habits and atopic disorder in parents should not be considered independent variables in epidemiological studies of the connection between exposure to tobacco smoke and atopy in children.
PubMed ID
11422156 View in PubMed
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The effect of tobacco ingredients on smoke chemistry. Part I: Flavourings and additives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180656
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2004;42 Suppl:S3-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Richard R Baker
José R Pereira da Silva
Graham Smith
Author Affiliation
British American Tobacco, Research and Development Centre, Regent's Park Road, Southampton SO15 8TL, UK. richard_baker@bat.com
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2004;42 Suppl:S3-37
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ammonia - analysis
Canada
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Chromatography, Gas - methods
Flavoring Agents - analysis - pharmacology
Formaldehyde - analysis
Humans
Lead - analysis
Nicotine - analysis
Nitrosamines - analysis
Reference Standards
Smoke - analysis
Spectrophotometry, Infrared - methods
Tobacco - adverse effects - chemistry
Tobacco Industry
United States
Abstract
The effects of 450 tobacco ingredients added to tobacco on the forty-four "Hoffmann analytes" in mainstream cigarette smoke have been determined. These analytes are believed by regulatory authorities in the USA and Canada to be relevant to smoking-related diseases. They are based on lists published by D. Hoffmann and co-workers of the American Health Foundation in New York. The ingredients comprised 431 flavours, 1 flavour/solvent, 1 solvent, 7 preservatives, 5 binders, 2 humectants, 2 process aids and 1 filler. The cigarettes containing mixtures of the ingredients were smoked using the standard ISO smoking machine conditions. The levels of the "Hoffmann analytes" in the smoke from the test cigarettes containing the ingredient mixture were compared to those from control cigarettes without the ingredients. In practice, flavouring ingredients are typically added to tobacco that also contains casing ingredients and reconstituted tobacco materials. In order to keep the tobacco mixtures as authentic as possible, three comparisons have been made in this study. These are: (a) control cigarette containing a typical US blended, cased tobacco incorporating reconstituted tobacco versus test cigarettes that had flavouring ingredients added to this tobacco; (b) control cigarette containing tobacco only versus test cigarettes with the tobacco cased and incorporating flavourings; (c) control cigarette containing tobacco only versus test cigarette incorporating additives made in an experimental sheet material. The significances of differences between the test and control cigarettes were determined using both the variability of the data on the specific occasion of the measurement, and also taking into account the long-term variability of the analytical measurements over the one-year period in which analyses were determined in the present study. This long-term variability was determined by measuring the levels of the 44 "Hoffmann analytes" in a reference cigarette on many occasions over the one-year period of this study. The ingredients were added to the experimental cigarettes at or above the maximum levels used commercially by British American Tobacco. The effect of the ingredient mixtures on total particulate matter and carbon monoxide levels in smoke was not significantly different to the control in most cases, and was never more than 10% with any ingredient mixture. It was found that, in most cases, the mixtures of flavouring ingredients (generally added in parts per million levels) had no statistically significant effect on the analyte smoke yields relative to the control cigarette. Occasionally with some of the mixtures, both increases and decreases were observed for some smoke analyte levels relative to the control cigarette. These differences were generally up to about 15% with the mixtures containing flavouring ingredients. The significance of many of the differences was not present when the long-term variability of the analytical methodology was taken into account. For the test cigarettes with ingredient mixtures containing casing ingredients, there were again no significant changes in smoke analyte levels in most cases. Those changes that were observed are as follows. Decreases in smoke levels were observed with some ingredient mixtures for most of the tobacco specific nitrosamines (up to 24%), NO(x), most of the phenols (up to 34%), benzo[a]pyrene, and some of the aromatic amines and miscellaneous organic compounds on the "Hoffmann list". Increases were observed for some test cigarettes in smoke ammonia, HCN, formaldehyde and lead levels (up to 24%). The significance of the ammonia and lead increases was not present when the long-term variability of the analytical methodology was taken into account. The yields of some carbonyl compounds in smoke were increased in one comparison with an additives mixture containing cellulosic components; in particular, formaldehyde was increased by 68%. This was the largest single change seen in any smoke analyte level in this study. These carbonyls are produced from the pyrolysis of cellulosnyls are produced from the pyrolysis of cellulosic and other polysaccharide materials, present in the additives mixture. With this test cigarette, all tobacco specific nitrosamines, phenols, semi-volatile bases, NO(x) and some aromatic amines and miscellaneous organic compounds on the "Hoffmann list" were decreased, by up to 22%. The significance of many of these differences remained even when the long-term variability of the analytical methodology was taken into account. The levels of all other "Hoffmann analytes" in the smoke were not significantly different to those of the control cigarette. With the exception of the determinations of "tar", nicotine and carbon monoxide, there are currently no internationally recognised standard methods for measurement of the other "Hoffmann analytes". Each laboratory uses its own methods and there are large laboratory-to-laboratory variations, as well as variations over time in a given laboratory. Therefore, it is important that in any comparison of smoke analytes amongst different cigarettes, all the analytes should be measured in the same laboratory and at the same time. This was the case in the present study and all the methods have been validated internally.
PubMed ID
15072836 View in PubMed
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Effects of tobacco control policy on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298020
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(suppl_2):14-16
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Marine Gambaryan
Aaron Reeves
Alexander Deev
Marina Popovich
Oxana Drapkina
Andrew Snell
David Stuckler
Kristina Mauer-Stender
Bente Mikkelsen
Sergey Boytsov
Author Affiliation
National Medical Research Centre for Preventive Medicine, Ministry of Health, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(suppl_2):14-16
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Morbidity - trends
Mortality - trends
Prevalence
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Policy
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Smoking Prevention
Taxes
Tobacco - adverse effects
Tobacco Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco Products - adverse effects - economics - supply & distribution
Abstract
According to the Global Adult Tobacco Survey carried out in Russia in 2009, the country had one of the highest smoking prevalence rates in Europe. In response to this health and economic burden, Russia implemented a comprehensive Tobacco Control Law (TCL) in 2013, which has been associated with a 21.5% relative decline in adult smoking prevalence in 2016 compared with 2009. This study tests the impact of the TCL on cardiovascular disease (CVD) related health outcomes, including morbidity and mortality.
The study evaluated the TCL as an intervention in a natural experiment during the period 2003-2015. A synthetic control was created as a comparator, using data from countries that did not have a comparable comprehensive tobacco control intervention. Changes in trends in CVD outcomes - hospital discharge rates (HDRs) and standardized death rates (SDRs) - were then compared to test for an impact associated with the TCL.
Pre-intervention trends in CVD-related HDRs were similar between Russia and the synthetic control, but became divergent after the TCL with greater benefit observed in Russia. This implies a beneficial impact of the TCL on CVD related morbidity in the Russian population. Whilst SDRs continued to reduce in both Russia and the control, the impact of TCL is less clear.
This study provides further evidence to support comprehensive tobacco control in line with the WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC). Alongside a reduction in tobacco consumption, smoking-related CVD morbidity appears to benefit quite soon after implementation, whilst smoking-related deaths might need a longer post-intervention period to be detectable.
PubMed ID
30371836 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.