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Commentaries -- Nutrition and metabolism

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94108
Source
Pages 154-164 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
goitre, presmnably due to iodine deficiency, was demonstrated earlier, it is not found now. Both thyrotoxicosis and myxoedema in Athabaskan Indians occur with only one-third the frequency that is found in Eskimos and in Tlingit Indians. Choleli thiasis is only half as frequent in northern Eskimos
  1 document  
Source
Pages 154-164 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aleuts
Diabetes mellitus
Direct photon absorptiometry
Disadaptive changes
Eskimos
Folate
Glucose tolerance
Indians
Iodine deficiency
Iron deficiency
Lactic Acid
Metabolic disease
Nganasans
Novosibirsk
Obesity
Phospholipids
Pribilof Islands
Pyruvic Acid
Rickets
Serum protein
Tlingits
Vitamin A
Notes
"Nutritional status of Indians and Eskimos as revealed by Nutrition Canada" (A.L. Forbes)
"Metabolic disease in arctic populations" (Edward M. Scott)
"Glucose tolerance among Aleuts on the Pribilof Islands" (S.E. Dippe, P.H. Bennett, D.W. Dippe, T. Humphry, J. Burks, and M. Miller)
"Biochemical mechanisms of human adaptation to the extreme factors of the north" (L. Panin)
"Bone mineral content of north Alaskan Eskimos" (Richard B. Mazess and Warren Mather)
"Bone mineral content in Canadian Eskimos" (Richard B. Mazess and Warren E. Mather)
Documents
Less detail
Source
Chapter 6, pages 88-97, Art of the Northern Tlingit, published by University of Washington Press
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1986
Author
Jonaitis, A.
Source
Chapter 6, pages 88-97, Art of the Northern Tlingit, published by University of Washington Press
Date
1986
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Crest and noncrest yek
Devilfish
Land otter
Mountain goats
Profane animals
Sacred animals
Tlingit animals
Water and shore birds
Yek
Abstract
The crest animal embodies all that man controls; it is the visual symbol of the social order. Animals of the supernatural domain, the yek controlled by shamans, differ considerably from crest animals. The Tlingit shaman encounters the yek animal on his vision quest, transforms into it during his masking ritual, and interacts continually with it.
Notes
Reference book found in Alaskana Collection: E99.T6 J65 1986
Less detail