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[1,4 millions Swedes are on the donation registry. Still several thousands newly registered persons per month].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208386
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2105-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-1997
Author
H. Gäbel
N. Rehnqvist
B. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Transplantationskirurgiska kliniken, Huddinge sjukhus, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2105-8
Date
May-28-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Public Opinion
Registries
Sweden
Tissue Donors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
9213668 View in PubMed
Less detail

[400,000 donation cards for transplantation available in Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228402
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Sep 5;87(36):2736
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-5-1990
Author
H. Gäbel
Author Affiliation
Transplantationskirurgiska kliniken, Huddinge sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Sep 5;87(36):2736
Date
Sep-5-1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Sweden
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement - methods
PubMed ID
2214982 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal beliefs about organ donation: some Coast Salish viewpoints.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175969
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Dec;36(4):110-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Anita E Molzahn
Rosalie Starzomski
Michael McDonald
Chloe O'Loughlin
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Victoria, British, Columbia, Canada. amolzahn@uvic.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Dec;36(4):110-28
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Organ Transplantation - ethnology
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Abstract
A large number of Aboriginal people await transplantation, and reluctance to donate organs has been noted among Aboriginal people. The purpose of this study was to explore the values and beliefs regarding organ donation of Coast Salish people living in British Columbia, Canada. Interviews were held with 14 people (8 women and 6 men) ranging in age from 25 to 63 years. Contextual themes were: lack of trust, life in Aboriginal communities, and tension between contemporary and traditional perspectives. Themes pertaining to death and dying were: acceptance of fate, death routines/rituals, and body wholeness. Themes pertaining to organ donation were: "we don't talk about it," transfer of spirit, and helping others. There was considerable diversity in beliefs among participants, which suggests that the beliefs held by an individual Aboriginal person should not be assumed to reflect those of any specific Aboriginal community.
PubMed ID
15739940 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal patients on the road to kidney transplantation: is residence location a barrier?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167757
Source
Kidney Int. 2006 Sep;70(5):826-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
K E Yeates
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. yeatesk@post.queensu.ca
Source
Kidney Int. 2006 Sep;70(5):826-8
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Rural
Humans
Indians, North American
Kidney Failure, Chronic - ethnology - surgery
Kidney Transplantation - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Rural Population
Tissue and Organ Procurement - methods
Transportation
Abstract
Aboriginal dialysis patients have reduced access to kidney transplantation. The reasons for this disparity are unknown. Tonelli et al. show that in Canada, residence location does not significantly impact on an Aboriginal dialysis patient's likelihood of receiving kidney transplantation. This Commentary explores the issue of decreased access and examines issues surrounding the findings of Tonelli et al.
Notes
Comment On: Kidney Int. 2006 Sep;70(5):924-3016788690
PubMed ID
16929330 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accepting kidneys from older living donors: impact on transplant recipient outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136196
Source
Am J Transplant. 2011 Apr;11(4):743-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
A. Young
S J Kim
M R Speechley
A. Huang
G A Knoll
G V Ramesh Prasad
D. Treleaven
M. Diamant
A X Garg
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Western Ontario, Canada. ann.young@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Am J Transplant. 2011 Apr;11(4):743-50
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cadaver
Canada
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Graft Rejection
Humans
Kidney - physiopathology - surgery
Kidney Function Tests
Kidney Transplantation - mortality
Living Donors
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Young Adult
Abstract
Older living kidney donors are regularly accepted. Better knowledge of recipient outcomes is needed to inform this practice. This retrospective cohort study observed kidney allograft recipients from Ontario, Canada between January 2000 and March 2008. Donors to these recipients were older living (= 60 years), younger living, or standard criteria deceased (SCD). Review of medical records and electronic healthcare data were used to perform survival analysis. Recipients received 73 older living, 1187 younger living and 1400 SCD kidneys. Recipients of older living kidneys were older than recipients of younger living kidneys. Baseline glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of older kidneys was 13 mL/min per 1.73 m² lower than younger kidneys. Median follow-up time was 4 years. The primary outcome of total graft loss was not significantly different between older and younger living kidney recipients [adjusted hazard ratio, HR (95%CI): 1.56 (0.98-2.49)]. This hazard ratio was not proportional and increased with time. Associations were not modified by recipient age or donor eGFR. There was no significant difference in total graft loss comparing older living to SCD kidney recipients [HR: 1.29 (0.80-2.08)]. In light of an observed trend towards potential differences beyond 4 years, uncertainty remains, and extended follow-up of this and other cohorts is warranted.
PubMed ID
21401866 View in PubMed
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Access to kidney transplantation: the limitations of our current understanding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160974
Source
J Nephrol. 2007 Sep-Oct;20(5):501-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
John S Gill
Olwyn Johnston
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia - Canada. jgill@providencehealth.bc.ca
Source
J Nephrol. 2007 Sep-Oct;20(5):501-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Living Donors
Patient Selection
Registries
Renal Insufficiency - epidemiology - surgery
Residence Characteristics
Time Factors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Since kidney transplantation (KTX) is the preferred means of treating kidney failure, ensuring that all patients who may benefit from KTX have equal access to this scarce resource is an important objective. Studies focusing on this issue will become increasingly important as the gap between the demand and supply of organs continues to increase, and changes to the United Network of Organ Sharing organ allocation policy are actively debated. However, it is clear that current methods used to study access to KTX have serious limitations. This review highlights the shortcomings of the methods currently used to assess access to KTX, and the limitations of registry data and national wait-list data as information sources to study patient access to KTX. The review also provides suggestions for research and analytical approaches that might be utilized to improve our future understanding of patient access to KTX. The information provided will aid the reader to critically assess issues related to patient access to KTX.
PubMed ID
17918132 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute dialysis risk in living kidney donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127475
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2012 Aug;27(8):3291-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Ngan Lam
Anjie Huang
Liane S Feldman
John S Gill
Martin Karpinski
Joseph Kim
Scott W Klarenbach
Greg A Knoll
Krista L Lentine
Chris Y Nguan
Chirag R Parikh
G V Ramesh Prasad
Darin J Treleaven
Ann Young
Amit X Garg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2012 Aug;27(8):3291-5
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - etiology - therapy
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Living Donors
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrectomy - adverse effects
Ontario
Renal Dialysis
Risk factors
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Abstract
Reduced kidney function confers a higher risk of acute kidney injury at the time of an inciting event, such as sepsis. Whether the same is true in those with reduced renal mass from living kidney donation is unknown.
We conducted a population-based matched cohort study of all living kidney donors in the province of Ontario, Canada who underwent donor nephrectomy from 1992 to 2009. We manually reviewed the medical records of these living kidney donors and linked this information to provincial health care databases. Non-donors were selected from the healthiest segment of the general population.
There were 2027 donors and 20 270 matched non-donors. The median age was 43 years (interquartile range 34-50) and individuals were followed for a median of 6.6 years (maximum 17.7 years). The primary outcome was acute dialysis during any hospital stay. Reasons for hospitalization included infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases and hematological malignancies. Only one donor received acute dialysis in follow-up (6.5 events per 100 000 person-years), a rate which was statistically no different than 14 non-donors (9.4 events per 100 000 person-years).
These results are reassuring for the practice of living kidney donation. Longer follow-up of this and other donor cohorts will provide more precise estimates about this risk.
Notes
Cites: Kidney Int. 2006 Nov;70(10):1801-1017003822
Cites: Transplantation. 2006 Dec 27;82(12):1646-817198252
Cites: Crit Care. 2007;11(2):R3117331245
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2008 Apr;61(4):344-918313558
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Jan 29;360(5):459-6919179315
Cites: Stat Med. 2009 Nov 10;28(25):3083-10719757444
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2009 Nov;9(11):2514-919681812
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2010 Sep;56(3):486-9520557989
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Aug 19;363(8):797-820818884
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2011 Jan;57(1):29-4321184918
Cites: Kidney Int. 2011 Jul;80(1):93-10421289597
Comment In: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2012 Aug;27(8):3021-322619313
PubMed ID
22290988 View in PubMed
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Advancing toward a modern death: the path from severe brain injury to neurological determination of death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185842
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Apr 15;168(8):993-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2003
Author
Sam D Shemie
Christopher Doig
Philip Belitsky
Author Affiliation
Division of Critical Care, Montreal Children's Hospital, Montréal, Que. sam.shemie@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Apr 15;168(8):993-5
Date
Apr-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Death - diagnosis
Brain Injuries - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Intensive Care Units
Neurologic Examination
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Ventilators, Mechanical
Waiting Lists
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Nov 2;161(9):1109-1310569086
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2000 Jan;28(1):100-310667506
Cites: J Neurotrauma. 2000 Jun-Jul;17(6-7):497-50610937892
Cites: Neurology. 2002 Jan 8;58(1):20-511781400
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Feb 21;346(8):557-6311856794
Cites: Can J Neurol Sci. 1999 Feb;26(1):64-610068812
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Nov 26;167(11):1248-912451079
Cites: JAMA. 1968 Aug 5;205(6):337-405694976
Cites: CMAJ. 1988 Mar 1;138(5):405-63342355
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Oct;158(4):1163-79769276
Cites: Acta Neurochir Suppl. 2002;81:77-912168363
PubMed ID
12695383 View in PubMed
Less detail

The AJT report: news and issues that affect organ and tissue transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116819
Source
Am J Transplant. 2013 Feb;13(2):243-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013

521 records – page 1 of 53.