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[400,000 donation cards for transplantation available in Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228402
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Sep 5;87(36):2736
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-5-1990
Author
H. Gäbel
Author Affiliation
Transplantationskirurgiska kliniken, Huddinge sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Sep 5;87(36):2736
Date
Sep-5-1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Sweden
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement - methods
PubMed ID
2214982 View in PubMed
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An appraisal of living donor kidney transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210506
Source
Transplant Proc. 1996 Dec;28(6):3559-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996

Attitudes toward reciprocity systems for organ donation and allocation for transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112830
Source
J Health Polit Policy Law. 2013 Oct;38(5):957-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Jacquelyn A Burkell
Jennifer A Chandler
Sam D Shemie
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario.
Source
J Health Polit Policy Law. 2013 Oct;38(5):957-86
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Organ Transplantation
Registries
Resource Allocation - methods
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Young Adult
Abstract
Many of those who support organ donation do not register to become organ donors. The use of reciprocity systems, under which some degree of priority is offered to registered donors who require an organ transplant, is one suggestion for increasing registration rates. This article uses a combination of survey and focus group methodologies to explore the reaction of Canadians to a reciprocity proposal. Our results suggest that the response is mixed. Participants are more convinced of the efficacy than they are of the fairness of a reciprocity system. Those more positive about donation (decided donors and those leaning toward donation) rate the system more positively. Although there is general endorsement of the notion that those who wish to receive should be prepared to give (the Golden Rule), this does not translate into universal support for a reciprocity system. In discussions of efficacy, decided donors focus on the positive impact of reciprocity, whereas undecided donors also reflect on the limits of reciprocity for promoting registration. The results demonstrate divided support for reciprocity systems in the Canadian context, with perceptions of efficacy at the cost of fairness. Further studies are warranted prior to considering a reciprocity system in Canada.
PubMed ID
23794739 View in PubMed
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Attitudes toward strategies to increase organ donation: views of the general public and health professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120265
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012 Dec;7(12):1956-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Lianne Barnieh
Scott Klarenbach
John S Gill
Tim Caulfield
Braden Manns
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012 Dec;7(12):1956-63
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Kidney Diseases - psychology
Kidney Transplantation - economics - psychology
Living Donors - supply & distribution
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Public Opinion
Reward
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement - economics - ethics - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
The acceptability of financial incentives for organ donation is contentious. This study sought to determine (1) the acceptability of expense reimbursement or financial incentives by the general public, health professionals involved with organ donation and transplantation, and those with or affected by kidney disease and (2) for the public, whether financial incentives would alter their willingness to consider donation.
Web-based survey administered to members of the Canadian public, health professionals, and people with or affected by kidney disease asking questions regarding acceptability of strategies to increase living and deceased kidney donation and willingness to donate a kidney under various financial incentives.
Responses were collected from 2004 members of the Canadian public October 11-18, 2011; responses from health professionals (n=339) and people with or affected by kidney disease (n=268) were collected during a 4-week period commencing October 11, 2011. Acceptability of one or more financial incentives to increase deceased and living donation was noted in >70% and 40% of all groups, respectively. Support for monetary payment for living donors was 45%, 14%, and 27% for the public, health professionals, and people with or affected by kidney disease, respectively. Overall, reimbursement of funeral expenses for deceased donors and a tax break for living donors were the most acceptable.
The general public views regulated financial incentives for living and deceased donation to be acceptable. Future research needs to examine the impact of financial incentives on rates of deceased and living donors.
Notes
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Comment In: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012 Dec;7(12):1917-923160262
PubMed ID
23024166 View in PubMed
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Barriers preventing liver transplantation in Canadians with HIV-infection--perceptions of HIV specialists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164508
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Mar;21(3):179-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Curtis L Cooper
Joanne DeForest
John Gill
Richard Lalonde
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada. ccooper@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Mar;21(3):179-82
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
HIV Infections - complications
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Hepatitis, Alcoholic - complications - surgery
Hepatitis, Viral, Human - complications - surgery
Humans
Liver Transplantation
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Abstract
Liver transplantation is a life-saving procedure with demonstrated utility. There are accumulating data indicating that this procedure is helpful in HIV-infected patients as well. Liver transplantation is currently largely unavailable to those living with HIV in Canada. Understanding the obstacles to this procedure is the first step to increasing access. Between August 2005 and November 2005, HIV physicians, one from each Canadian HIV Trials Network site, were asked to complete a quantitative questionnaire on adult liver transplant access and need. Forty-six per cent (16 of 35) of sites responded. A median 20% of the nearly 12,700 HIV patients followed at these sites had concurrent liver disease (20% caused by hepatitis C virus, 5% caused by hepatitis B virus and 5% were alcohol-related). On average, two patients per site were thought to be appropriate candidates for liver transplant evaluation. Eighty per cent of respondents anticipated increased need for liver transplantation over the next five years. Organ supply was universally identified as the chief obstacle to transplantation in patients with HIV. Other key issues included risk of hepatitis C virus reinfection and transplant surgical team willingness. Based on these data, it is believed that these issues should be the focus of efforts designed to increase access to transplantation in Canadians with end-stage liver disease and concurrent HIV.
Notes
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2001 Feb;120(3):749-6211179248
Cites: Liver Transpl. 2006 Jun;12(6):998-101116721776
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Dec 13;345(24):178111742060
Cites: Drugs. 2002;62(7):995-101111985487
Cites: Liver Transpl. 2002 Oct;8(10 Suppl 1):S14-812362293
Cites: Liver Transpl. 2002 Oct;8(10 Suppl 1):S67-7312362302
Cites: Transplantation. 2002 Dec 15;74(11):1655-612490807
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2003 Mar;124(3):642-5012612903
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Aug 10;343(6):404-1010933740
Cites: Liver Transpl. 2000 Sep;6(5):553-6110980053
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Feb 1;32(3):492-711170959
Cites: Liver Transpl. 2003 Mar;9(3):239-4712619020
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Cites: J Infect Dis. 2003 Nov 15;188(10):1412-2014624365
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PubMed ID
17377647 View in PubMed
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Cadaveric organ donation in Scandinavia, 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218079
Source
Transplant Proc. 1994 Jun;26(3):1715-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
H. Gäbel
J. Ahonen
G. Södal
L. Lamm
Author Affiliation
Department of Transplantation Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Transplant Proc. 1994 Jun;26(3):1715-6
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Cadaver
Europe
Humans
Registries
Scandinavia
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement - methods
Abstract
In countries with active organ transplant programs and wide acceptance criteria for transplant recipients, such as the four Scandinavian countries, the need for organ grafts has outgrown the supply of cadaveric organs. We cannot expect to attain the maximum number of cadaveric donors every year and in every procurement area because the number of donors depends not only on the efficacy of the procurement program but also on the age of the population, incidence of road traffic accidents, treatment facilities, and other factors. The maximum numbers are set as a goal to strive for, however, Countries that participate in an exchange of cadaver organs to obtain well-matched kidneys for uremic patients and life-saving grafts at a suitable time for heart, lung, and liver recipients, must all have the same approximate number of cadaver donors. Major imbalances in the number of donors and also in the number of patients waiting for a transplantation may result in the supply of organ allografts for one country or region being met by the population of another region. With confidence we are looking forward to the impact of intensified public information and education of hospital personnel on the gap between demand and supply of organ allografts.
PubMed ID
8030097 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of a national initiative to increase the number of kidneys for transplant purposes in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206983
Source
Transplant Proc. 1997 Dec;29(8):3234-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997

Different diagnostic approaches to adult candidates for cadaveric kidney transplantation in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196364
Source
Transpl Int. 2000;13 Suppl 1:S263-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
L. Fritsche
K P Nordal
Y. Vanrenterghem
J M Grinyo
F. Moreso
K. Budde
H H Neumayer
Author Affiliation
Med. Klinik m. S. Nephrologie, Universitätsklinikum Charité, Berlin, Germany. Lutz.Fritsche@charite.de
Source
Transpl Int. 2000;13 Suppl 1:S263-6
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cadaver
Europe
Female
Geography
Great Britain
Humans
Kidney
Kidney Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient Selection
Questionnaires
Scandinavia
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement - organization & administration
Abstract
We investigated which diagnostic procedures are mandatory for all transplant candidates irrespective of their individual situation in European transplant centres, how homogeneously these are applied and what centre characteristics determine differences in the diagnostic approach. A questionnaire was sent to European renal transplant centres asking which of 45 listed diagnostic procedures are mandatory for every transplant candidate. The 154 participating centres require 15.6 +/- 5.6 (4-33) mandatory tests, with significantly less mandatory diagnostics in centres in the UK (8.5 +/- 3.9) and Scandinavia (9.8 +/- 2.3). Geographic location is the single significant factor in multifactorial analysis of possibly related factors. Detailed analysis revealed 16 tests that are required significantly less often in the north of Europe. There are significant differences in the evaluation of renal transplant candidates across Europe. In some parts of Europe transplant candidates are either investigated more discriminately or less comprehensively than in other regions.
PubMed ID
11112009 View in PubMed
Less detail

59 records – page 1 of 6.