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48 records – page 1 of 5.

Analysis of deaths after heart transplantation: the University of Ottawa Heart Institute experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220432
Source
J Heart Lung Transplant. 1993 Sep-Oct;12(5):790-801
Publication Type
Article
Author
V M Walley
R G Masters
S A Boone
A L Wolfsohn
R A Davies
P J Hendry
W J Keon
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Heart Lung Transplant. 1993 Sep-Oct;12(5):790-801
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anastomosis, Surgical - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Assisted Circulation - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Forecasting
Heart Diseases - pathology - physiopathology
Heart Transplantation - adverse effects - mortality - pathology
Heart, Artificial - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Reoperation
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study reviews the clinical outcome of the 132 orthotopic heart transplantations performed at our institute from 1984 through 1991 and focuses on the pathology of those patients who died. The study comprised 124 adults (mean age, 45.6 +/- 0.9 years) and eight children. Twenty-six adult and one pediatric deaths occurred. Operative mortality (within 30 days) was 10.6%, with 84.8% of patients surviving to discharge. Actuarial probabilities of survival at 1 and 5 years were 84% +/- 3% and 71% +/- 6%, respectively. Of the 27 deaths, six (22.2%) occurred in the operating room (from hemorrhage, graft failure, and hyperacute rejection); 14 (51.9%) occurred in-hospital after surgery (from sepsis, rejection, cytomegalovirus disease, or myocardial infarct), and seven (25.9%) occurred after discharge (from rejection and/or recurrent coronary artery disease). Two groups of patients were at higher risk: patients in cardiogenic shock requiring pretransplantation mechanical support, with in-hospital mortality of 39.1%; and patients with previous valve replacement who were taking oral anticoagulants, with intraoperative mortality of 50.0%. Pathologic examination revealed occasional instances of unsuspected coronary artery disease in the donor hearts with more than 50% stenoses of the left anterior descending coronary arteries in three of 21 (14.3%) of cases. Complications of the transplantation or related therapeutic procedures were common among those who died. The complications ranged from functionally insignificant anatomic curiosities to life-threatening problems. These complications are tabulated and shown.
PubMed ID
8241216 View in PubMed
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An update of the Canadian Organ Replacement Register (1998).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200733
Source
Clin Transpl. 1998;:97-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
D A Parsons
S E Tracy
K A Handa
P D Greig
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin Transpl. 1998;:97-106
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Child
Female
Graft Survival
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - surgery
Kidney Transplantation - mortality - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Life tables
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Survival Rate
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement - statistics & numerical data
Transplantation - mortality - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
CORR reports that 21,451 transplants have been performed from 1981-1996. Approximately 78% of these have been kidney transplantations. Survival statistics revealed that progress has been made to improve both patient and graft survival, particularly during the period between 1991-1996. Consequently, the number of patients being followed with a functioning transplant increased to 11,645. There has been a rise in the number of kidney transplants, which is largely attributed to an increase in the number of living donors. Data also revealed that there was increasing acceptance of elderly patients, who were not transplant candidates, into dialysis programs. Furthermore, the percentage of the number of patients alive with functioning kidney transplants to the total number of patients with ESRD increased from 41% in 1981 to 46% in 1996. Non-renal transplant activity has increased in the recent past. Overall, 5-year patient and graft survival was about 70%. This improvement in survival was associated with a reduction in 30-, 60- and 90-day mortality. The organ donation rate has increased slightly from 13.9 donors per million population in 1994 to 14.1 in 1996. The majority of Canadian donors were multi-organ donors, while fewer were kidney, liver, heart or lung-specific donors only. The proportion of female donors has increased. The number of patients waiting for transplants continues to increase. Approximately 3,072 patients are on waiting lists; the majority are for kidney transplants. As the increase in the number of donors does not match the increasing numbers of transplants needed, this suggests that greater efforts are necessary to reduce this difference.
PubMed ID
10503088 View in PubMed
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Aspects of present and future data presentation in Scandiatransplant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89507
Source
Transplant Proc. 2009 Mar;41(2):732-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Grunnet N.
Bödvarsson M.
Jakobsen A.
Kyllönen L.
Olausson M.
Pfeffer P.
Sørensen S Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Scandiatransplant, Aarhus, Denmark. grunnet@scandiatransplant.org
Source
Transplant Proc. 2009 Mar;41(2):732-5
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Brain Death
Cadaver
Cause of Death
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Finland
Forecasting
Heart Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Liver Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Lung Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Organ Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Resource Allocation - statistics & numerical data
Scandinavia
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Scandiatransplant is the Nordic organ exchange organization having existed for almost 40 years. With close collaboration between transplant centers in the Nordic countries, it has been valuable to ensure the optimal usage of available organs. The heart is the most often exchanged organ within the collaboration. It has been decided to create a priority for hyperimmunized kidney patients for compulsory exchange of organs from deceased donors. The age of the deceased organ donors has changed from younger to older donors. The evaluation of deceased kidney transplantations and deceased liver transplantations from 1995 to 2007 is shown for 4 countries. Iceland by itself is performing living donor kidney transplantations with great intensity. Scandiatransplant will make efforts to present more data than just transplantation to yield a more complete picture of organ transplantation.
PubMed ID
19328968 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the need for organ transplantation in Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218224
Source
CMAJ. 1994 May 1;150(9):1443-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1994
Author
M. Carrier
R. Cartier
L C Pelletier
Author Affiliation
Département de chirurgie, Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal, Qué.
Source
CMAJ. 1994 May 1;150(9):1443-8
Date
May-1-1994
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases, Factual
Humans
Organ Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement - methods - organization & administration
Abstract
To evaluate the demand for organs for transplantation and to recommend a reorganization of transplantation services in Quebec.
Retrospective study.
Province of Quebec, 1988 to 1992.
All patients on waiting lists for organ transplantation and patients who received transplants registered in national data banks.
The actual annual demand for organ transplantation and the rate of transplantations performed.
The rates of heart transplantation were lower than the actual annual demand, which resulted in many patients dying while awaiting transplantation. The actual annual demand for heart transplantation decreased during the last 5 years from 10.9 per million people in 1987 to 6.7 in 1992. The rates of heart transplantation in Quebec were higher than the Canadian average. The actual demand for lung transplantation was only 2.9 per million people on average in 1992. Demand for liver transplantation increased annually, reaching 8.6 per million in 1992. The rate of transplantation increased likewise but remained insufficient. The demand for kidney transplantation reached 27.2 per million people in 1992, and the transplantation rate was 17.8.
Taking into account the actual demand for and supply of organ transplantation, to insure high-quality service and to control costs associated with organ transplantation, we recommend that the present system in Quebec be reorganized so that transplantations are performed in 12 centres: 7 for kidney transplantation, 2 for hearts, 2 for livers and 1 for lungs.
Notes
Cites: Surg Clin North Am. 1986 Jun;66(3):603-163086992
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1993 Jul;22(1):8-148509567
Cites: Ann Thorac Surg. 1990 Feb;49(2):177-82306137
Cites: Ann Thorac Surg. 1990 Feb;49(2):220-3; discussion 223-42306143
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1990 Aug;16(2):249-922197309
Cites: Transplant Proc. 1991 Feb;23(1 Pt 2):1315-71989224
Cites: JAMA. 1992 Jan 8;267(2):239-461727520
Cites: Ann Chir. 1991;45(9):791-51781622
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1992 Jun;27(2):219-381592606
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1992 Sep 17;327(12):834-91508242
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1992 Oct 22;327(17):1220-51406795
Cites: J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1992 Nov;104(5):1308-11; discussion 1311-31434711
Cites: Transplant Proc. 1992 Dec;24(6):2586-911465874
Cites: Ann Thorac Surg. 1993 Mar;55(3):5818452415
Cites: Ann Thorac Surg. 1993 Mar;55(3):719-238452437
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Jun 12;257(22):3073-53295312
PubMed ID
8168008 View in PubMed
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Attitudes, knowledge, and proficiency in relation to organ donation: a questionnaire-based analysis in donor hospitals in northern Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171888
Source
Transplant Proc. 2005 Oct;37(8):3256-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
L. Bøgh
M. Madsen
Author Affiliation
Unit for Clinical Quality, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby Sygehus, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. BLL@sks.aaa.dk
Source
Transplant Proc. 2005 Oct;37(8):3256-7
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Cadaver
Denmark
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Questionnaires
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data
Tissue and Organ Procurement - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess knowledge, attitudes, and proficiency in relation to organ donation among staff members of intensive care units (ICUs) in donor hospitals, and possibly identify areas for improvement. The investigation was carried out as a collaboration between the transplant center and appointed key persons in all 17 ICUs in 15 hospitals in northern Denmark. A total of 1168 structured questionnaires were distributed to the health care professionals in the ICUs in the region; 689 were returned, giving a response rate of 59%. In general, there is a positive attitude among health care professionals toward organ donation. However, a considerable fraction of 11% declares to be against organ donation. Only 49% of the ICU health care professionals are willing to donate their own organs after death. By comparison, 74% of the general Danish population are willing to donate organs after death. Doctors are more positive toward organ donation than the nursing staff. Thus, 95% of the doctors are positive to organ donation compared to 81% of the nurses; 70% of the doctors will donate own organs after death compared to 45% of the nurses. Further, the survey demonstrates as expected a significant lack of experience in organ donation. Our data show a considerable need for more education and training, especially on how to inform and support the donor relatives and how to identify potential donors. The survey also discloses a substantial need for information regarding the results of transplantation.
PubMed ID
16298563 View in PubMed
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[Cadaver organ donation in Norway 1989-92].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220047
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Oct 30;113(26):3255-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1993
Author
B. Lien
A. Flatmark
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk avdeling B Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Oct 30;113(26):3255-7
Date
Oct-30-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cadaver
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Abstract
The annual number of cadaveric organ donors in Norway increased from an average of 12.4 per million inhabitants per year in the period 1985-88 to 13.1 in the period 1989-92. An increase to 20 organ donors per million per year is required to meet the anticipated need for organs. The donation rates differ greatly between health regions. Possible strategies to increase the organ donation rate are discussed.
PubMed ID
8236221 View in PubMed
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[Cadaver organ donation in Norway 1993-96]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33872
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Apr 20;118(10):1550-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-20-1998
Author
B. Lien
I B Brekke
A. Flatmark
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk avdeling B, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Apr 20;118(10):1550-3
Date
Apr-20-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cadaver
Cause of Death
Child
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Humans
Norway
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data
Tissue and Organ Procurement - statistics & numerical data - trends
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The annual number of cadaveric organ donors increased from 13.1 per million inhabitants in the period 1989-92 to 15.8 in the period 1993-96. Multiple organ harvesting was performed in 68% of the donors. There are significant differences in donation rate between health regions. An increase to 20 organ donors per year per million inhabitants is required to meet the anticipated need for organs. Strategies to increase organ donation are discussed.
PubMed ID
9615581 View in PubMed
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Clinical islet transplantation at the University of Alberta--the Edmonton experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164211
Source
Clin Transpl. 2005;:153-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Wayne Truong
Jonathan R T Lakey
Edmond A Ryan
A M James Shapiro
Author Affiliation
Clinical Islet Transplant Program, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB, Canada.
Source
Clin Transpl. 2005;:153-72
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Animals
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Graft Survival
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Islets of Langerhans - cytology
Islets of Langerhans Transplantation - immunology - statistics & numerical data
Organ Preservation - methods
Patient Selection
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data
Tissue and Organ Procurement - methods
Transplantation, Heterologous - immunology
Transplantation, Homologous - immunology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
While the field of islet transplantation has evolved over the past 30 years and exponential progress and increase in clinical activity has occurred during the past 5 years, it is clear that major challenges still remain, particularly in understanding why islet function seems to decay over time. High one-year rates of insulin independence, and high 5-year rates of partial islet function (with C-peptide secretion and protection from hypoglycemia) are now routine. Improved control of glycated HbA1c and reduced risk of recurrent hypoglycemia are benefits of islet transplantation irrespective of the status of insulin independence. If complete and sustained freedom from insulin is the primary objective, it is clear that whole pancreas transplantation still offers far superior metabolic reserve. However, the less interventional nature of islet infusion and avoidance of major surgery are advantages of islet transplantation over whole pancreas strategies. While the anti-rejection drugs available today may have had an acceptable safety profile in most islet transplant recipients, the drug-related and dose-limiting side effects have proved to be a challenge in some patients. Current islet-alone transplantation requires lifelong immunosuppression and is limited to patients with recurrent severe hypoglycemia and severe labile diabetes. More effective treatments are needed to control both acute rejection and recurrent autoimmunity. Remarkable opportunities lie ahead for improved islet survival, better engraftment and the possibility of expansion of islet mass both in culture and possibly within the patient after transplantation. Living-donor islet transplantation offers one option to expand the available donor supply, but remains controversial because of the potential for diabetes induction or other morbidities in a healthy donor. The development of less toxic immunosuppression and perhaps immunological tolerance will one day also have a huge impact on this field. Alternative tissue sources from either xenogenic sources or stem cells will ultimately solve the challenge of limited donor supply.
PubMed ID
17424733 View in PubMed
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48 records – page 1 of 5.