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[1,4 millions Swedes are on the donation registry. Still several thousands newly registered persons per month].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208386
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2105-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-1997
Author
H. Gäbel
N. Rehnqvist
B. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Transplantationskirurgiska kliniken, Huddinge sjukhus, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2105-8
Date
May-28-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Public Opinion
Registries
Sweden
Tissue Donors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
9213668 View in PubMed
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20 years or more of follow-up of living kidney donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222923
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1992
Author
J S Najarian
B M Chavers
L E McHugh
A J Matas
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Date
Oct-3-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Creatinine - blood - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Kidney - physiology
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Proteinuria - etiology
Pulmonary Embolism - mortality
Tissue Donors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The perioperative and long-term risks for living kidney donors are of concern. We have studied donors at the University of Minnesota 20 years or more (mean 23.7) after donation by comparing renal function, blood pressure, and proteinuria in donors with siblings. In 57 donors (mean age 61 [SE 1]), mean serum creatinine is 1.1 (0.01) mg/dl, blood urea nitrogen 17 (0.5) mg/dl, creatinine clearance 82 (2) ml/min, and blood pressure 134 (2)/80 (1) mm Hg. 32% of the donors are taking antihypertensive drugs and 23% have proteinuria. The 65 siblings (mean age 58 [1.3]) do not significantly differ from the donors in any of these variables: 1.1 (0.03) mg/dl, 17 (1.2) mg/dl, 89 (3.3) ml/min, and 130 (3)/80 (1.5) mm Hg, respectively. 44% of the siblings are taking antihypertensives and 22% have proteinuria. To assess perioperative mortality, we surveyed all members of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons about donor mortality at their institutions. We documented 17 perioperative deaths in the USA and Canada after living donation, and estimate mortality to be 0.03%. We conclude that perioperative mortality in the USA and Canada after living-donor nephrectomy is low. In long-term follow-up of our living donors, we found no evidence of progressive renal deterioration or other serious disorders.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1992 Nov 28;340(8831):1354-51360068
PubMed ID
1357243 View in PubMed
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[400,000 donation cards for transplantation available in Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228402
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Sep 5;87(36):2736
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-5-1990
Author
H. Gäbel
Author Affiliation
Transplantationskirurgiska kliniken, Huddinge sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Sep 5;87(36):2736
Date
Sep-5-1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Sweden
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement - methods
PubMed ID
2214982 View in PubMed
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Absence of human herpes virus 8 in semen from healthy Danish donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7580
Source
Hum Reprod. 1999 Sep;14(9):2274-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
J. Kelsen
B. Tarp
N. Obel
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Marselisborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, P.P. Oerumsgade 11, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Hum Reprod. 1999 Sep;14(9):2274-6
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
DNA, Viral - analysis
Denmark
Herpesvirus 8, Human - genetics - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sarcoma, Kaposi - virology
Semen - virology
Sexually transmitted diseases
Tissue Donors
Abstract
Epidemiological data indicate a sexual route of transmission of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) associated Kaposi's sarcoma. Recently human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) has been proposed as the aetiological agent for development of Kaposi's sarcoma. Further the virus has been reported in semen obtained from healthy men. In Denmark strict biochemical and microbiological criteria are used in combination with an intensive interview to select semen donors. Despite these strict criteria, HHV-8 may be transmitted to a recipient and even the child by the use of donor semen. We used four different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and one nested PCR to test semen from 100 Danish donors for the presence of HHV-8 DNA. All 100 samples were consistently negative for HHV-8 DNA, while only one sample (1%) was positive for cytomegalovirus DNA. As HHV-8 was not demonstrated in any of the semen samples, we conclude that the frequency of HHV-8 in semen from Danish donors is very low.
PubMed ID
10469694 View in PubMed
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Access to organs for transplantation: overcoming "rejection".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239279
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 Jan 15;132(2):113-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1985
Author
M A Somerville
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 Jan 15;132(2):113-7
Date
Jan-15-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cadaver
Canada
Commerce
Contract Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Ethics, Medical
Graft Rejection
Health Services Accessibility - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Tissue Donors - psychology
Abstract
Recent success in overcoming rejection of transplanted organs has led to a much greater demand for organs from donors and to a reconsideration of mechanisms for increasing the availability of organs from cadavers. In the latter respect the two basic systems are "contracting-in" and "contracting-out". Each system has different benefits and harms, and it is a value judgement that should be adopted. However, both systems raise legal, ethical and practical issues that must be addressed if organs for transplantation are to become available to all who need them.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1984 Feb 18;1(8373):407-811644279
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1983 Apr;13(2):20-26853148
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1983 Dec;13(6):23-326360951
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1983 May;143(5):975-86679240
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1984 Mar 29;310(13):864-86366555
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1984 Feb;14(1):22-36715148
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Mar 23-30;251(12):15926700059
PubMed ID
3880649 View in PubMed
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Age-related changes in the transmission properties of the human lens and their relevance to circadian entrainment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98067
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2010 Feb;36(2):308-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Line Kessel
Jesper Holm Lundeman
Kristina Herbst
Thomas Vestergaard Andersen
Michael Larsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Nordre Ringvej 57, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. linkes01@glo.regionh.dk
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2010 Feb;36(2):308-12
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aging - physiology
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Humans
Lens, Crystalline - physiology - radiation effects
Light
Middle Aged
Photoperiod
Rod Opsins - metabolism
Spectrum Analysis
Tissue Donors
Young Adult
Abstract
PURPOSE: To characterize age-related changes in the transmission of light through noncataractous human lenses. SETTING: Department of Ophthalmology, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. METHODS: The spectral transmission of white light was measured along the visual axis in the most central part of the lens in vitro in intact human donor lenses over a wide range of ages. RESULTS: The study evaluated 28 intact human donor lenses of 15 donors aged 18 to 76 years. Increasing age was associated with gradually decreasing transmission at all visible wavelengths, most prominently at shorter wavelengths. Empirical formulas describing the age-related loss of transmission were created for each spectral color. At 480 nm, the absorption peak for melanopsin, transmission decreased by 72% from the age of 10 years to the age of 80 years. CONCLUSION: The age-related decrease in spectral transmission through the human lens could be modeled by a simple algorithm that may be useful in the design of intraocular lenses that mimic the characteristics of the human lens and in studies of color vision, psychophysics, and melanopsin activation.
PubMed ID
20152615 View in PubMed
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AIDS and ethics: an analytic framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232665
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1988 Aug;34:1787-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988
Author
Philip B Berger
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1988 Aug;34:1787-92
Date
Aug-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Canada
Child
Civil Rights
Confidentiality
Duty to Warn
Emigration and Immigration
General Surgery
HIV Seropositivity
Health education
Humans
Jurisprudence
Mass Screening
Patient Care
Patients
Physicians
Privacy
Public Health
Public Policy
Quarantine
Substance-Related Disorders
Tissue Donors
Abstract
The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic has raised difficult ethical issues in public policy formulation and in the care of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Many issues relate to measures proposed for the protection of the public from HIV infection. This article presents an analytic framework from which these measures can be rationally evaluated. Specific measures are assessed on the basis of their likelihood of success, in relation to their justification for infringement on individual rights, and with reference to other less intrusive measures that could accomplish the same objective. Case histories are discussed which raise ethical dilemmas in the care of HIV infected and high-risk patients. The application of this framework could assist physicians in analysing public health policy and making judgements in individual clinical situations.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Oct 23-30;258(16):2298-30011652513
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Mar 13;257(10):1357-663546744
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Oct 9;258(14):19403656608
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Oct 9;258(14):1939-403656607
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Oct 9;258(14):1924-83309386
Cites: Lancet. 1987 Sep 12;2(8559):589-932887886
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Oct 29;317(18):1125-353309656
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Mar 4;259(9):1353-62963151
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Mar 4;259(9):1357-93276950
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Feb 18;318(7):444-73340123
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Jun 24;259(24):3609-103131557
Cites: Lancet. 1988 May 14;1(8594):11182896956
Cites: JAMA. 1988 May 20;259(19):2898-93367458
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Feb 25;318(8):473-83422337
PubMed ID
11650250 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaska governor vetoes HIV criminal exposure bill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2995
Source
AIDS Policy Law. 1998 Jul 24;13(13):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-24-1998
Source
AIDS Policy Law. 1998 Jul 24;13(13):12
Date
Jul-24-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Criminal Law
Dangerous Behavior
Female
HIV Infections - transmission
Humans
Male
Public Health
Self Disclosure
Sexual Behavior
State Government
Tissue Donors
Abstract
On June 19, 1998, Alaskan governor Tony Knowles vetoed legislation that would have made it a felony to knowingly expose a person to HIV. Senate Bill 17 would have made criminal transmission of HIV a Class B felony, carrying a penalty of up to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $50,000. The legislation would have applied to those who knowingly expose others to HIV through sex or needle-sharing without informing their partners. The bill also would have made it illegal for people who know they are HIV positive to donate organs, semen, or ova.
PubMed ID
11365577 View in PubMed
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Allele and haplotype frequencies of HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1 in Northern Ossetians from Vladikavkaz, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296552
Source
Hum Immunol. 2018 Oct; 79(10):709-710
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Elena Kuzminova
Ekaterina Khamaganova
Tatiana Gaponova
Valeriy Savchenko
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Hematology, Novy Zykovsky proezd 4, Moscow, 125167, Russian Federation. Electronic address: kotvanka@gmail.com.
Source
Hum Immunol. 2018 Oct; 79(10):709-710
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alleles
Gene Frequency
Genetic Variation
Genetics, Population
HLA-A Antigens - genetics
HLA-B Antigens - genetics
HLA-C Antigens - genetics
HLA-DQ beta-Chains - genetics
HLA-DRB1 Chains - genetics
Haplotypes
Histocompatibility Antigens Class I - genetics
Humans
Russia
Tissue Donors
Abstract
This report shows the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 and -DQB1 allele and haplotype frequencies in a population of 127 healthy Ossetian donors of blood marrow from Vladikavkaz, Russia. First- and second-field (for HLA-C locus) HLA genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific priming and/or oligonucleotide probes. Statistical analysis were performed using gene counting and Arlequin software packages. There was no deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for all tested loci. The HLA genotypic and haplotypic data of the Ossetians reported here are available in free access at the Allele Frequencies Net Database (http://www.allelefrequencies.net). This data can serve as a reference database for further HLA-based studies in population genetics.
PubMed ID
30081065 View in PubMed
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582 records – page 1 of 59.