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16750 records – page 1 of 1675.

Empirical evidence for a recent slowdown in irrigation-induced cooling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95608
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Aug 21;104(34):13582-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-2007
Author
Bonfils Céline
Lobell David
Author Affiliation
School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, CA 95344, USA. bonfils2@llnl.gov
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Aug 21;104(34):13582-7
Date
Aug-21-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cold Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
Understanding the influence of past land use changes on climate is needed to improve regional projections of future climate change and inform debates about the tradeoffs associated with land use decisions. The effects of rapid expansion of irrigated area in the 20th century has remained unclear relative to other land use changes, such as urbanization, that affected a similar total land area. Using spatial and temporal variations in temperature and irrigation extent observed in California, we show that irrigation expansion has had a large cooling effect on summertime average daily daytime temperatures (-0.14 degrees C to -0.25 degrees C per decade), which corresponds to an estimated cooling of -1.8 degrees C to -3.2 degrees C since the introduction of irrigation practices. Irrigation has negligible effects on nighttime temperatures, leading to a net cooling effect of irrigation on climate (-0.06 degrees C to -0.19 degrees C per decade). Stabilization of irrigated area has occurred in California since 1980 and is expected in the near future for many irrigated regions. The suppression of past human-induced greenhouse warming by increased irrigation is therefore likely to slow in the future, and a potential decrease in irrigation may even contribute to a more rapid warming. Changes in irrigation alone are not expected to influence broad-scale temperatures, but they may introduce large uncertainties in climate projections for irrigated agricultural regions, which provide approximately 40% of global food production.
PubMed ID
17698963 View in PubMed
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[In the eve of general election[Editorial]].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284955
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Sep;102(9):375
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Thorbjorn Jonsson
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Sep;102(9):375
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Iceland
Politics
Time Factors
PubMed ID
27646177 View in PubMed
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[The Journal of the Norwegian Medical Association and the authors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276516
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Apr 19;136(7):594
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-2016
Author
Knut Gjesdal
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Apr 19;136(7):594
Date
Apr-19-2016
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Norway
Periodicals as Topic - standards
Time Factors
PubMed ID
27094656 View in PubMed
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[Study of the labor market for dentists who recieved Norwegian authorization during 1972-1975. I. Waiting time and alternative employment before the 1st relevant job]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75929
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1977 Jul;87(7):324-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1977
Author
O. Haugejorden
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1977 Jul;87(7):324-9
Date
Jul-1977
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dentists
Employment
English Abstract
Norway
Time Factors
Abstract
The purpose of the investigation was to monitor changes in the labour market situation for dentists who received authorization to practise dentistry in Norway during the years 1972-1975. Data was collected by postal questionnaire during April/May of the year following authorization, except for the 1972 cohort, which was contacted the second year after authorization. A 92-95 per cent response rate was achieved using one follow-up (Table 1). The percentage of respondents who waited 8 weeks or more to acquire a job in dentistry increased from 15 for those authorized in 1972 to 36 for the 1975 group (Table 3). The proportion of dentists who took paid employment other than dentistry, increased from just over 3 per cent for the 1973 to 14 per cent for the 1975 cohort (Table 4). This development has occured despite a decrease in the number of dentists receiving authorization each year and has resulted in a limited emigration of dentists. It is suggested that the favourable supply of dentists in relation to existing demand for dental services presents an ideal opportunity for attempting to solve dental health problems which have received inadequate attention in the past.
PubMed ID
267269 View in PubMed
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[Part-time work--every third one wants longer working hours].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207223
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Oct 14;85(17):18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-1997
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Oct 14;85(17):18
Date
Oct-14-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Norway
Time Factors
Women, Working
PubMed ID
9393086 View in PubMed
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[Ideology trumps evidence with new voluntary survey.].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141155
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Oct 5;182(14):E692-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-5-2010
Author
Marsha Cohen
Paul C Hébert
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Oct 5;182(14):E692-3
Date
Oct-5-2010
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Censuses
Humans
Privacy
Public Policy
Time Factors
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Jul 29;179(3):245-5218663204
PubMed ID
20805204 View in PubMed
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Long-term unemployment among women in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74070
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1987;25(2):153-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
S O Brenner
L. Levi
Author Affiliation
Department of Technical Psychology, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1987;25(2):153-61
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Sweden
Time Factors
Unemployment
Women - psychology
Abstract
Vulnerability at long-term unemployment is discussed and the results of a study of the effects of job loss and long-term unemployment among Swedish women are presented. Psychological and physiological data for the unemployed were sampled repeatedly over a two year period. Some of the unemployed were subject to an intervention programme aiming at buffering for the possibly negative effects of unemployment. Health data from matched control groups of employed were gathered over the same period. The results indicate a strong negative stress reaction at the job loss period, followed by a gradual adaptation to the conditions of unemployment as measured by biochemical and physiological health indicators. However, a substantial proportion of the unemployed compared to the employed showed a lower degree of psychological well-being and more severe depressive reactions. Recommendations are given concerning further research approaches on long-term unemployment. Policy implications to reduce vulnerability at long-term unemployment are discussed.
PubMed ID
3660005 View in PubMed
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A comparison of growing season indices for the Greater Baltic Area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95708
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2006 Nov;51(2):107-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Walther A.
Linderholm H W
Author Affiliation
Regional Climate Group, Earth Sciences Centre, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. alex@gvc.gu.se
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2006 Nov;51(2):107-18
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Europe
Plants - growth & development
Seasons
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
Predictions of the effects of global warming suggest that climate change may have large impacts on ecosystems. The length of the growing season is predicted to increase in response to increasing global temperatures. The object of this study was to evaluate different indices used for calculating the thermal growing season for the Greater Baltic Area (GBA). We included established indices of growing season start, end and length, as well as new and modified indices. Based on the results, the GBA can be divided into a maritime western part and a more continental eastern part, with the western part reacting more sensitively to the use of different indices. The eastern part is more stable, but even here the index-to-index differences are large. It was found that including or excluding a frost criterion had a significant influence on the initiation of the growing season in the western, maritime, parts of the GBA. Frost has not the same importance for the end of the growing season. However, some end indices can result in a "never ending" growing season. When looking at twentieth century trends in growing season parameters, it was found that, when averaged over the whole GBA, there was little difference in trends depending on the indices used. The general mean trend in the GBA for the twentieth century discloses an earlier onset of c. 12 days, a delayed end of c. 8 days and consequently a lengthening of the growing season of about 20 days.
PubMed ID
16932889 View in PubMed
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[Aerotherapy in improving children's health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245663
Source
Med Sestra. 1980 Jul;37(7):3-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1980
Author
G V Grafova
Source
Med Sestra. 1980 Jul;37(7):3-6
Date
Jul-1980
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air
Baths
Child
Climate
Humans
Russia
Time Factors
PubMed ID
6448941 View in PubMed
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A summary of data on accumulated occupational radiation doses among Canadian workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217147
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Oct;67(4):393-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
W N Sont
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Radiation and Medical Devices, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Oct;67(4):393-8
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Occupational Exposure
Radiation monitoring
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper is based on work done on accumulated career doses. The data are taken from the National Dose Registry and consist of accumulated doses to the monitored workforce from the years 1970, 1975, 1980, 1985, and 1990. Four broad occupational categories are analyzed: medicine, nuclear power, uranium processing (including mining, milling, refining, and fuel fabrication), and industry. Two- and three-dimensional bar charts are used to display workforce sizes, collective accumulated doses, and average accumulated doses over time, broken down by career start. Lognormal plots are used to show the distribution of accumulated doses. Many trends are as could be expected, and some of those may be used for construction of statistical models for career-dose accumulation. The size and accumulated career doses in the workforces of the uranium processing category do not vary regularly with time, and in this case modeling is likely to be difficult.
PubMed ID
8083052 View in PubMed
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16750 records – page 1 of 1675.