Skip header and navigation

Refine By

16673 records – page 1 of 1668.

Empirical evidence for a recent slowdown in irrigation-induced cooling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95608
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Aug 21;104(34):13582-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-2007
Author
Bonfils Céline
Lobell David
Author Affiliation
School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, CA 95344, USA. bonfils2@llnl.gov
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Aug 21;104(34):13582-7
Date
Aug-21-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cold Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
Understanding the influence of past land use changes on climate is needed to improve regional projections of future climate change and inform debates about the tradeoffs associated with land use decisions. The effects of rapid expansion of irrigated area in the 20th century has remained unclear relative to other land use changes, such as urbanization, that affected a similar total land area. Using spatial and temporal variations in temperature and irrigation extent observed in California, we show that irrigation expansion has had a large cooling effect on summertime average daily daytime temperatures (-0.14 degrees C to -0.25 degrees C per decade), which corresponds to an estimated cooling of -1.8 degrees C to -3.2 degrees C since the introduction of irrigation practices. Irrigation has negligible effects on nighttime temperatures, leading to a net cooling effect of irrigation on climate (-0.06 degrees C to -0.19 degrees C per decade). Stabilization of irrigated area has occurred in California since 1980 and is expected in the near future for many irrigated regions. The suppression of past human-induced greenhouse warming by increased irrigation is therefore likely to slow in the future, and a potential decrease in irrigation may even contribute to a more rapid warming. Changes in irrigation alone are not expected to influence broad-scale temperatures, but they may introduce large uncertainties in climate projections for irrigated agricultural regions, which provide approximately 40% of global food production.
PubMed ID
17698963 View in PubMed
Less detail

[In the eve of general election[Editorial]].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284955
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Sep;102(9):375
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Thorbjorn Jonsson
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Sep;102(9):375
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Iceland
Politics
Time Factors
PubMed ID
27646177 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The Journal of the Norwegian Medical Association and the authors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276516
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Apr 19;136(7):594
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-2016
Author
Knut Gjesdal
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Apr 19;136(7):594
Date
Apr-19-2016
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Norway
Periodicals as Topic - standards
Time Factors
PubMed ID
27094656 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Study of the labor market for dentists who recieved Norwegian authorization during 1972-1975. I. Waiting time and alternative employment before the 1st relevant job]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75929
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1977 Jul;87(7):324-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1977
Author
O. Haugejorden
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1977 Jul;87(7):324-9
Date
Jul-1977
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dentists
Employment
English Abstract
Norway
Time Factors
Abstract
The purpose of the investigation was to monitor changes in the labour market situation for dentists who received authorization to practise dentistry in Norway during the years 1972-1975. Data was collected by postal questionnaire during April/May of the year following authorization, except for the 1972 cohort, which was contacted the second year after authorization. A 92-95 per cent response rate was achieved using one follow-up (Table 1). The percentage of respondents who waited 8 weeks or more to acquire a job in dentistry increased from 15 for those authorized in 1972 to 36 for the 1975 group (Table 3). The proportion of dentists who took paid employment other than dentistry, increased from just over 3 per cent for the 1973 to 14 per cent for the 1975 cohort (Table 4). This development has occured despite a decrease in the number of dentists receiving authorization each year and has resulted in a limited emigration of dentists. It is suggested that the favourable supply of dentists in relation to existing demand for dental services presents an ideal opportunity for attempting to solve dental health problems which have received inadequate attention in the past.
PubMed ID
267269 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Part-time work--every third one wants longer working hours].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207223
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Oct 14;85(17):18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-1997
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1997 Oct 14;85(17):18
Date
Oct-14-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Norway
Time Factors
Women, Working
PubMed ID
9393086 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of growing season indices for the Greater Baltic Area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95708
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2006 Nov;51(2):107-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Walther A.
Linderholm H W
Author Affiliation
Regional Climate Group, Earth Sciences Centre, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. alex@gvc.gu.se
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2006 Nov;51(2):107-18
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Europe
Plants - growth & development
Seasons
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
Predictions of the effects of global warming suggest that climate change may have large impacts on ecosystems. The length of the growing season is predicted to increase in response to increasing global temperatures. The object of this study was to evaluate different indices used for calculating the thermal growing season for the Greater Baltic Area (GBA). We included established indices of growing season start, end and length, as well as new and modified indices. Based on the results, the GBA can be divided into a maritime western part and a more continental eastern part, with the western part reacting more sensitively to the use of different indices. The eastern part is more stable, but even here the index-to-index differences are large. It was found that including or excluding a frost criterion had a significant influence on the initiation of the growing season in the western, maritime, parts of the GBA. Frost has not the same importance for the end of the growing season. However, some end indices can result in a "never ending" growing season. When looking at twentieth century trends in growing season parameters, it was found that, when averaged over the whole GBA, there was little difference in trends depending on the indices used. The general mean trend in the GBA for the twentieth century discloses an earlier onset of c. 12 days, a delayed end of c. 8 days and consequently a lengthening of the growing season of about 20 days.
PubMed ID
16932889 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The geography of aging in atlantic Canada: analysis from the point of view of territorial disparities during 1981-2006].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129922
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Dec;30(4):563-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Majella Simard
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. majella.simard@umoncton.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Dec;30(4):563-76
Date
Dec-2011
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Humans
Time Factors
Abstract
Following the example of other Canadian provinces, those in Atlantic Canada are affected, albeit to a lesser degree, by the increase in the number of persons aged 65 or over, a trend that we can define as gerontogrowth. In addition, this region of Canada seems particularly affected by the trend of an aging population, that is, the rise in the proportion of people in the total population aged 65 or more. For example, on a national scale, New Brunswick is the third oldest province according to the last five-year period (2001-2006), having advanced from the fourth position it held between 1981 and 2001 and from the fifth position occupied between 1971 and 1981. In addition, these trends evolve in different manners in different places, contrasts that are strongest at the regional and local level. The goal of this article is to examine the strength of these disparities during the period 1981 to 2006 and to identify some potential solutions for a territorial development strategy for seniors.
PubMed ID
22051402 View in PubMed
Less detail

A summary of data on accumulated occupational radiation doses among Canadian workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217147
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Oct;67(4):393-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
W N Sont
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Radiation and Medical Devices, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Oct;67(4):393-8
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Occupational Exposure
Radiation monitoring
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper is based on work done on accumulated career doses. The data are taken from the National Dose Registry and consist of accumulated doses to the monitored workforce from the years 1970, 1975, 1980, 1985, and 1990. Four broad occupational categories are analyzed: medicine, nuclear power, uranium processing (including mining, milling, refining, and fuel fabrication), and industry. Two- and three-dimensional bar charts are used to display workforce sizes, collective accumulated doses, and average accumulated doses over time, broken down by career start. Lognormal plots are used to show the distribution of accumulated doses. Many trends are as could be expected, and some of those may be used for construction of statistical models for career-dose accumulation. The size and accumulated career doses in the workforces of the uranium processing category do not vary regularly with time, and in this case modeling is likely to be difficult.
PubMed ID
8083052 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Apr 17;71(16):1631-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-17-1974
Author
G A Lundquist
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Apr 17;71(16):1631-2
Date
Apr-17-1974
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - diagnosis
Humans
Sweden
Time Factors
PubMed ID
4825484 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in the seasonal incidence of measles in Iceland, 1896--1974.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245182
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1980 Dec;85(3):451-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1980
Author
A D Cliff
P. Haggett
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1980 Dec;85(3):451-7
Date
Dec-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Iceland
Measles - epidemiology - etiology
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
The changing seasonal patterns of reported measles cases in Iceland during this century are analysed. These changes are related to increased population mobility following the development of external and internal transport links, particularly since 1945. The forging of such links has resulted in a shift in the seasonal distribution of cases from one peculiar to the local social and economic conditions in Iceland to one broadly similar to that in other countries of northern temperate latitudes.
Notes
Cites: J Theor Biol. 1966 Jul;11(2):207-115965486
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1979 Feb;109(2):103-23218446
PubMed ID
7462595 View in PubMed
Less detail

16673 records – page 1 of 1668.