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Acute tick-borne rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia heilongjiangensis in Russian Far East.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179613
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 May;10(5):810-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Oleg Y Mediannikov
Yuri Sidelnikov
Leonid Ivanov
Eugenia Mokretsova
Pierre-Edouard Fournier
Irina Tarasevich
Didier Raoult
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Rickettsial Ecology, Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Moscow, Russia. olegusss1@mail.ru
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 May;10(5):810-7
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - analysis - isolation & purification
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Rickettsia - classification - genetics - immunology
Rickettsia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - physiopathology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Siberia - epidemiology
Tick-Borne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - physiopathology
Abstract
An acute tick-borne rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia heilongjiangensis was diagnosed in 13 patients from the Russian Far East in 2002. We amplified and sequenced four portions of three rickettsial genes from the patients' skin biopsy results and blood samples and showed that the amplified rickettsial genes belong to R. heilongjiangensis, which was recently isolated from Dermacentor sylvarum ticks in nearby regions of China. This rickettsia, belonging to subgroup of R. japonica, was previously suggested to be pathogenic for humans on the basis of serologic findings. We tested serum samples with different rickettsial antigens from 11 patients and confirmed increasing titers of immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM to spotted fever group rickettsiae, including R. heilongjiangensis. Clinical and epidemiologic data on these patients show that this disease is similar to other tick-borne rickettsioses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15200813 View in PubMed
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[An epidemiological analysis of ixodid tick-borne borreliosis (ITBB) morbidity in Kirovo-Chepetsk District, Kirov Province in 1996-1998].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197298
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2000 Jul-Sep;(3):16-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
G V Pervakova
O Iu Chastikov
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2000 Jul-Sep;(3):16-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Animals
Arachnid Vectors
Borrelia Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Ixodes
Male
Morbidity - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Tick-Borne Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
The epidemiological and some clinical features of tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) in the Kirovo-Chepetsk District, Kirov Province were studied and the data were statistically processed. The incidence rates of the disease in the region were compared with those of other Russian regions by sex, age, and occupation. The study revealed where and when infection had occurred, the duration of tick's attachment to the patient with TBRF, determined the duration of its incubative period, assessed whether a short-term prognosis of the expected number of patients can be made by the number of tick-bitten persons. The Kirovo-Chepetsk District is an active highly endemic focus of TBRF. Its incidence is tens of times higher that of other natural and focal infections.
PubMed ID
10981405 View in PubMed
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The burden of tick-borne diseases in the Altai region of Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290986
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 08; 8(5):787-794
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
V G Dedkov
E G Simonova
O V Beshlebova
M V Safonova
O A Stukolova
E V Verigina
G V Savinov
I P Karaseva
E A Blinova
V M Granitov
I V Arsenjeva
G A Shipulin
Author Affiliation
Central Research Institute for Epidemiology (CRIE), Federal Service on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-Being Surveillance, Moscow, Russia; Research Institute of Occupational Health, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address: vgdedkov@yandex.ru.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 08; 8(5):787-794
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Coinfection - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Humans
Incidence
Lyme Disease - epidemiology - microbiology
Prevalence
Risk
Siberia - epidemiology
Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Tick-Borne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Abstract
This article presents the results of a comprehensive survey of the burden of tick-borne infectious diseases (TBIDs) in the Altai region of Russia. Official data for TBID incidence were analyzed and 201 samples from patients with suspected TBID were studied. Furthermore, questing ticks and ticks recovered from humans were examined to estimate prevalence of TBID-causative agents. The Altai region was determined to have a heightened risk for TBIDs in Russia. The most epidemiologically significant tick-borne illness in this area is spotted fever group rickettsiosis, while nationally in Russia, the leading TBID is Lyme borreliosis. The prevalence of mixed infection was 12.4% among the studied cases. Additionally, the prevalence of poorly studied pathogens - Kemerovo virus (KEMV) and Rickettsia tarasevichiae - in ticks from the Altai region was determined.
PubMed ID
28648773 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3175-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Bygbjerg Ib Christian
Schiøler Karin Linda
Konradsen Flemming
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, International Sundhed, ISIM, Denmark. iby@sund.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3175-8
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate
Communicable disease control
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Vectors
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Leishmaniasis - epidemiology - transmission
Malaria, Falciparum - epidemiology - transmission
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Tick-Borne Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
World Health
Abstract
The predicted changes in climate have raised concerns that vector-borne diseases may emerge or expand in tempered regions. Malaria, leishmaniasis and tick-borne illnesses are discussed in terms of climate change and their endemic potential, especially in Denmark. While climate may play an important role in disease patterns, it is evident that transmission potential is governed by a complex of factors, including socio-economy, health-care capacity and ecology. In Denmark, malaria and leishmaniasis are unlikely to become public health problems, whereas the potential for tick-borne illnesses may increase.
PubMed ID
19857395 View in PubMed
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Cross-sectional study of the seroprevalence to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and granulocytic Ehrlichia spp. and demographic, clinical and tick-exposure factors in Swedish horses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14038
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2001 May 1;49(3-4):191-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2001
Author
A. Egenvall
P. Franzén
A. Gunnarsson
E O Engvall
I. Vågsholm
U B Wikström
K. Artursson
Author Affiliation
Department of Ruminant Medicine and Veterinary Epidemiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7019, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden. agneta.egenvall@kirmed.slu.se
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2001 May 1;49(3-4):191-208
Date
May-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Borrelia burgdorferi Group - immunology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Ehrlichia - immunology
Ehrlichiosis - epidemiology - immunology - veterinary
Female
Horse Diseases - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Horses
Lyme Disease - epidemiology - immunology - veterinary
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Tick-Borne Diseases - epidemiology - immunology - veterinary
Ticks
Abstract
A cross-sectional study of the seroprevalence to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and granulocytic Ehrlichia spp. in Swedish horses was conducted to evaluate associations with demographic, clinical and tick-exposure factors. From September 1997-1998, blood samples from 2018 horses were collected from the animals presented to veterinary clinics affiliated with the Swedish Horserace Totalizator Board (regardless of the primary cause for consultation). Standardized questionnaires with information both from owners and attending veterinarians accompanied each blood sample. The apparent seroprevalences to B. burgdorferi s. l. and granulocytic Ehrlichia spp. were 16.8 and 16.7%, respectively. The northern region had the lowest seroprevalences. Four logistic models were developed (controlling for demographic variables). In the disease model of seropositivity to B. burgdorferi s. l., age, breed, geographic region, the serologic titer to granulocytic Ehrlichia spp., season and the diagnosis coffin-joint arthritis were significant. In the tick-exposure model of B. burgdorferi s. l., pasture access the previous year and gender were significant. Age, racing activity, geographic region, season and the serologic titer to B. burgdorferi s. l. were associated with positivity to granulocytic Ehrlichia spp. In the tick-exposure model of granulocytic Ehrlichia spp., pasture access was a risk factor. An interaction between racing activity and geographic region showed that the risk of positive serologic reactions to Ehrlichia spp. was increased in the horse population in the south and middle of Sweden, but only among horses not used for racing. Except for the positive association between coffin-joint arthritis and serologic reactions to B. burgdorferi s. l., there were no significant associations in the multivariable models between non-specific or specific clinical sign or disease with seropositivity to either of these agents.
PubMed ID
11311953 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dog survey in Russian veterinary hospitals: tick identification and molecular detection of tick-borne pathogens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297845
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2018 Nov 14; 11(1):591
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-14-2018
Author
Natalia N Livanova
Natalia V Fomenko
Ivan A Akimov
Mikhail J Ivanov
Nina V Tikunova
Rob Armstrong
Sergey V Konyaev
Author Affiliation
Institute of Systematics and Ecology of Animals, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Frunze, 11, 630091, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Parasit Vectors. 2018 Nov 14; 11(1):591
Date
Nov-14-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic - microbiology - parasitology
Arthropod Vectors - microbiology - parasitology
Babesia - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Borrelia - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Dogs
Ehrlichia - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Female
Hospitals, Animal - statistics & numerical data
Ixodidae - microbiology - parasitology
Rickettsia - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Russia
Surveys and Questionnaires
Theileria - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Tick Infestations - epidemiology - veterinary
Tick-Borne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology - veterinary
Abstract
Species of Canidae in Russia can be infested with up to 24 different tick species; however, the frequency of different tick species infesting domestic dogs across Russia is not known. In addition, tick-borne disease risks for domestic dogs in Russia are not well quantified. The goal of this study was to conduct a nationwide survey of ticks collected from infested dogs admitted to veterinary clinics in Russian cities and to identify pathogens found in these ticks.
Ticks feeding on dogs admitted to 32 veterinary clinics in 27 major cities across Russia were preserved in ethanol and submitted to a central facility for examination. After identification, each tick was evaluated for infection with known tick-borne pathogens using PCR.
There were 990 individual ticks collected from 636 dogs. All collected ticks belonged to the Ixodidae (hard ticks) and represented 11 species of four genera, Dermacentor, Ixodes, Rhipicephalus and Haemaphysalis. Four most common tick species were D. reticulatus, followed by I. persulcatus, I. ricinus and R. sanguineus. Ixodes persulcatus ticks were found to be infected with 10 different pathogens, and ticks of this species were more frequently infected than either D. reticulatus or I. ricinus. Ixodes persulcatus females were also more frequently co-infected with two or more pathogens than any other tick. Pathogenic species of five genera were detected in ticks: Anaplasma centrale, A. phagocytophilum and A. marginale; Babesia canis, B. microti, B. venatorum, B. divergens, B. crassa and B. vogeli; Borrelia miyamotoi, B. afzelii and B. garinii; Ehrlichia muris, E. canis and E. ruminantum; and Theileria cervi. Anaplasma marginale, E. canis, B. crassa, B. vogeli and T. cervi were detected in I. persulcatus, and Babesia canis in D. marginatum, for the first time in Russia.
Multiple ticks from four genera and 11 species of the family Ixodidae were collected from domestic dogs across Russia. These ticks commonly carry pathogens and act as disease vectors. Ixodes persulcatus ticks present the greatest risk for transmission of multiple arthropod-borne pathogens.
PubMed ID
30428925 View in PubMed
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[Ecology and epidemiology of tick-borne infections in the Primorsky Krai].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146992
Source
Parazitologiia. 2009 Sep-Oct;43(5):418-27
Publication Type
Article
Author
E I Bolotin
E G Burukhina
Source
Parazitologiia. 2009 Sep-Oct;43(5):418-27
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arachnid Vectors
Humans
Incidence
Lyme Disease - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Population Dynamics
Rickettsia Infections - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Tick Control
Tick-Borne Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology - transmission
Ticks
Abstract
Interrelation of parasitological and epidemiological estimations of potential danger of different territories Primorsky Krai concerning presence of natural foci of tick-borne diseases is discussed. Comparative analysis of long-term dynamics of the tick-borne diseases' sickness rate in comparison with long-term dynamics of the vector ticks' abundance has been carried out.
PubMed ID
19957909 View in PubMed
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Ecology and molecular epidemiology of tick-borne rickettsioses and anaplasmoses with natural foci in Russia and Kazakhstan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79768
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006 Oct;1078:299-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Rudakov Nikolay
Shpynov Stanislav
Fournier Pierre-Edouard
Raoult Didier
Author Affiliation
Omsk Research Institute of Natural Foci Infections, 644080, prospect Mira, 7 Omsk, Russia. rickettsia@mail.ru
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2006 Oct;1078:299-304
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaplasma - genetics - isolation & purification
Anaplasmosis - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Kazakhstan - epidemiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Rickettsia - genetics - isolation & purification
Rickettsia Infections - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Tick-Borne Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
During our more than 20 years of monitoring, we have used epidemiological, field, and experimental methods for characterization of natural foci of tick-borne rickettsioses in Russia. The main results were obtained through genetic methods (PCR sequence) at the Université de la Mediterranée (Marseille, France). We describe considerable heterogeneity of tick-borne alpha(1)-proteobacteria: 16 microorganisms the of the order Rickettsiales were detected in Russia and Kazakhstan. R. sibirica-caused North Asiatic tick-borne rickettsiosis is the main tick-borne rickettsiosis in Russia, with wide distribution in Siberia and the Russian Far East and high epidemic activity of natural foci of different landscape types. Our results show circulation of different pathogenic rickettsiae in the same endemic territories. In the Far East region, R. sibirica subsp. R. sibirica, R. sibirica subsp. BJ-90, and R. heilongjiangensis were detected; in the Altay and Krasnojarsk regions, R. sibirica subsp. R. sibirica and R. heilongjiangensis; and in the Kurgan district of West Siberia, R. sibirica subsp. R. sibirica and R. slovaca. The roles of more than 15 new genotypes of alpha(1)-proteobacteria in infectious disease in Russia and Kazakhstan are in need of further study.
PubMed ID
17114725 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.