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2-year patient-related versus stent-related outcomes: the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120892
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2012
Author
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Per Thayssen
Evald Høj Christiansen
Hans Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Knud Nørregaard Hansen
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Steen Hansen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Morten Madsen
Leif Thuesen
Jens Flensted Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. okkels@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Date
Sep-25-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - therapy
Death
Denmark
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data
Single-Blind Method
Sirolimus - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Thrombosis - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited head-to-head randomized data on patient-related versus stent-related outcomes for everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES).
In the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) trial, comparing the EES with the SES in patients with coronary artery disease, the EES was noninferior to the SES at 9 months.
The primary endpoint was a composite: cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), definite stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization. Safety and efficacy outcomes at 2 years were further assessed with specific focus on patient-related composite (all death, all MI, or any revascularization) and stent-related composite outcomes (cardiac death, target vessel MI, or symptom-driven target lesion revascularization). A total of 1,390 patients were assigned to receive the EES, and 1,384 patients were assigned to receive the SES.
At 2 years, the composite primary endpoint occurred in 8.3% in the EES group and in 8.7% in the SES group (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 to 1.22). The patient-related outcome: 15.0% in the EES group versus 15.6% in the SES group, (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.78 to 1.15), and the stent-related outcome: 5.2% in the EES group versus 5.3% in the SES group (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.35) did not differ between groups. Rate of definite stent thrombosis was lower in the EES group (0.2% vs. 0.9%, (HR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.80).
At 2-year follow-up, the EES was found to be noninferior to the SES with regard to both patient-related and stent-related clinical outcomes.
PubMed ID
22958957 View in PubMed
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Clopidogrel discontinuation within the first year after coronary drug-eluting stent implantation: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259840
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2014;14:100
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Troels Thim
Martin Berg Johansen
Gro Egholm Chisholm
Morten Schmidt
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Leif Thuesen
Steen Dalby Kristensen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jens Flensted Lassen
Per Thayssen
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Hans-Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2014;14:100
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Thrombosis - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Denmark
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Prescriptions
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Ticlopidine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The impact of adherence to the recommended duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after first generation drug-eluting stent implantation is difficult to assess in real-world settings and limited data are available.
We followed 4,154 patients treated with coronary drug-eluting stents in Western Denmark for 1 year and obtained data on redeemed clopidogrel prescriptions and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE, i.e., cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or stent thrombosis) from medical databases.
Discontinuation of clopidogrel within the first 3 months after stent implantation was associated with a significantly increased rate of MACE at 1-year follow-up (hazard ratio (HR) 2.06; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-3.93). Discontinuation 3-6 months (HR 1.29; 95% CI: 0.70-2.41) and 6-12 months (HR 1.29; 95% CI: 0.54-3.07) after stent implantation were associated with smaller, not statistically significant, increases in MACE rates. Among patients who discontinued clopidogrel, MACE rates were highest within the first 2 months after discontinuation.
Discontinuation of clopidogrel was associated with an increased rate of MACE among patients treated with drug-eluting stents. The increase was statistically significant within the first 3 months after drug-eluting stent implantation but not after 3 to 12 months.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25125079 View in PubMed
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