Skip header and navigation

Refine By

93 records – page 1 of 10.

2-year clinical outcomes after implantation of sirolimus-eluting, paclitaxel-eluting, and bare-metal coronary stents: results from the WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89935
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-2009
Author
Kaltoft Anne
Jensen Lisette Okkels
Maeng Michael
Tilsted Hans Henrik
Thayssen Per
Bøttcher Morten
Lassen Jens Flensted
Krusell Lars Romer
Rasmussen Klaus
Hansen Knud Nørregaard
Pedersen Lars
Johnsen Søren Paaske
Sørensen Henrik Toft
Thuesen Leif
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. annekaltoft@stofanet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Date
Feb-24-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Coronary Disease - mortality - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Paclitaxel
Sirolimus
Stents - adverse effects
Thrombosis - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This registry study assessed the safety and efficacy of the 2 types of drug-eluting stents (DES), sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES), compared with bare-metal stents (BMS). BACKGROUND: Drug-eluting stents may increase the risk of stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), and death. METHODS: A total of 12,395 consecutive patients with coronary intervention and stent implantation recorded in the Western Denmark Heart Registry from January 2002 through June 2005 were followed up for 2 years. Data on death and MI were ascertained from national medical databases. We used Cox regression analysis to control for confounding. RESULTS: The 2-year incidence of definite ST was 0.64% in BMS patients, 0.79% in DES patients (adjusted relative risk [RR]: 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72 to 1.65), 0.50% in SES patients (adjusted RR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.35 to 1.15), and 1.30% in PES patients (adjusted RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.94). The incidence of MI was 3.8% in BMS-treated patients, 4.5% in DES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.51), 4.1% in SES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.15, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.47), and 5.3% in PES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.81). Whereas overall 2-year adjusted mortality was similar in the BMS and the 2 DES stent groups, 12- to 24-month mortality was higher in patients treated with PES (RR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.02 to 2.09). Target lesion revascularization was reduced in both DES groups. CONCLUSIONS: During 2 years of follow-up, patients treated with PES had an increased risk of ST and MI compared with those treated with BMS and SES. Mortality after 12 months was also increased in PES patients.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):665-619232898
PubMed ID
19232897 View in PubMed
Less detail

2-year patient-related versus stent-related outcomes: the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120892
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2012
Author
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Per Thayssen
Evald Høj Christiansen
Hans Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Knud Nørregaard Hansen
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Steen Hansen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Morten Madsen
Leif Thuesen
Jens Flensted Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. okkels@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Date
Sep-25-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - therapy
Death
Denmark
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data
Single-Blind Method
Sirolimus - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Thrombosis - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited head-to-head randomized data on patient-related versus stent-related outcomes for everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES).
In the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) trial, comparing the EES with the SES in patients with coronary artery disease, the EES was noninferior to the SES at 9 months.
The primary endpoint was a composite: cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), definite stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization. Safety and efficacy outcomes at 2 years were further assessed with specific focus on patient-related composite (all death, all MI, or any revascularization) and stent-related composite outcomes (cardiac death, target vessel MI, or symptom-driven target lesion revascularization). A total of 1,390 patients were assigned to receive the EES, and 1,384 patients were assigned to receive the SES.
At 2 years, the composite primary endpoint occurred in 8.3% in the EES group and in 8.7% in the SES group (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 to 1.22). The patient-related outcome: 15.0% in the EES group versus 15.6% in the SES group, (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.78 to 1.15), and the stent-related outcome: 5.2% in the EES group versus 5.3% in the SES group (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.35) did not differ between groups. Rate of definite stent thrombosis was lower in the EES group (0.2% vs. 0.9%, (HR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.80).
At 2-year follow-up, the EES was found to be noninferior to the SES with regard to both patient-related and stent-related clinical outcomes.
PubMed ID
22958957 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Abnormal coagulation in critical care patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177817
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(14):1745-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004

Advanced age, low left atrial appendage velocity, and factor V promoter sequence variation as predictors of left atrial thrombosis in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146014
Source
J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2010 Aug;30(2):192-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Dmitry A Zateyshchikov
Alexey N Brovkin
Dimitry A Chistiakov
Valery V Nosikov
Author Affiliation
Scientific-Educational Medical Center of the Department of General Management of Russian President, Moscow, Russia.
Source
J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2010 Aug;30(2):192-9
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Atrial Appendage - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Atrial Function, Left
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Echocardiography, Transesophageal
Factor V - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia
Stroke Volume
Thrombosis - etiology - genetics - physiopathology
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) renders individual patients at risk for development of an atrial thrombus. The aim of this study was to determine clinical and echocardiographic factors influencing the risk of left atrial thrombosis (LAT) in patients with persistent nonvalvular AF. Genetic variants encoding haemostatic factors have been also assessed for putative association with LAT. In the cross-sectional study, a total of 212 patients (132 males and 80 females) with nonvalvular persistent AF (duration range 48 h-90 days) have been selected. LAT was visualized by transesophageal echocardiography. The FGB G(-455)A, PAI-1 4G/5G, F5 C(-224)T, and F5 R506Q genetic markers were tested using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) approach. To reveal independent factors contributing to the thromboembolic risk in AF, a multivariate logistic model was applied. LA thrombi were found in 44 out of 212 subjects (21%). LAT was more frequently observed in patients at age >75 years (P 75 years, LVEF
PubMed ID
20082208 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse events during treatment of critical limb ischemia with autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell implant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127035
Source
Int Angiol. 2012 Feb;31(1):77-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
T B Jonsson
T. Larzon
B. Arfvidsson
U. Tidefelt
C G Axelsson
M. Jurstrand
L. Norgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden. thomas.jonsson@surgsci.uu.se
Source
Int Angiol. 2012 Feb;31(1):77-84
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amputation
Angiography, Digital Subtraction
Ankle Brachial Index
Critical Illness
Cytokines - blood
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor - administration & dosage
Heart Failure - etiology - mortality
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization
Humans
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - blood
Ischemia - blood - complications - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology - surgery
Limb Salvage
Lower Extremity - blood supply
Male
Mesenteric Vascular Occlusion - etiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Pain - etiology - prevention & control
Pain Measurement
Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation - adverse effects - mortality
Pilot Projects
Predictive value of tests
Recombinant Proteins - administration & dosage
Reoperation
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Thrombosis - etiology - mortality
Time Factors
Transplantation, Autologous
Treatment Outcome
Wound Healing
Abstract
Trials have reported clinical improvement and reduced need for amputation in critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients receiving therapeutic angiogenesis with stem cells. Our objective was to test peripheral stem cell therapy efficacy and safety to gain experiences for further work.
We included nine CLI patients (mean age 76.7 ±9.7). Stem cells were mobilized to the peripheral blood by administration of G-CSF (Filgrastim) for 4 days, and were collected on day five, when 30 mL of a stem cell suspension was injected into 40 points of the limb. The clinical efficacy was evaluated by assessing pain relief, wound healing and changes in ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI). Local metabolic and inflammatory changes were measured with microdialysis, growth factors and cytokine level determination. Patients were followed for 24 weeks.
Four patients experienced some degree of improvement with pain relief and/or improved wound healing and ABI increase. One patient was lost to follow up due to chronic psychiatric illness; one was amputated after two weeks. Two patients had a myocardial infarction (MI), one died. One patient died from a massive mesenteric thrombosis after two weeks and one died from heart failure at week 11. Improved patients showed variable effects in cytokine-, growth factor- and local metabolic response.
Even with some improvement in four patients, severe complications in four out of nine patients, and two in relation to the bone marrow stimulation, made us terminate the study prematurely. We conclude that with the increased risk and the reduced potential of the treatment, peripheral blood stem cell treatment in the older age group is less appropriate. Metabolic and inflammatory response may be of value to gain insight into mechanisms and possibly to evaluate effects of therapeutic angiogenesis.
PubMed ID
22330628 View in PubMed
Less detail

An association between the common hereditary hemochromatosis mutation and the factor V Leiden allele in a population with thrombosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204897
Source
Blood. 1998 Aug 15;92(4):1461-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1998

Aneurysm of the profunda femoris artery manifested as acute groin pain in a child.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30652
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2003 Nov;38(11):1699-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Pekka Rainio
Fausto Biancari
Sami Leinonen
Tatu Juvonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardio-thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2003 Nov;38(11):1699-700
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arteriovenous Fistula - complications - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation
Child
Diagnosis, Differential
Femoral Artery - pathology - surgery
Femoral Vein - pathology - surgery
Groin
Humans
Male
Pain - etiology
Saphenous Vein - transplantation
Thrombosis - etiology
Tunica Media - pathology
Abstract
Arterial aneurysms in children are extremely rare and can be of congenital, inflammatory, and infectious nature or secondary to trauma. The authors describe the case of a 8-year-old boy who was admitted in the hospital with fever and severe groin pain. He had a true saccular aneurysm of 4 cm in diameter originating from the profunda femoris artery with, according to the clinical and angiographic findings, arteriovenous communication with the femoral veins. Because the aneurysm was firmly adherent to the deep femoral vein, the latter was resected and the venous continuity was restored with a saphenous vein bypass graft. The patient recovered without any complication. The histologic examination showed a normal intimal layer and partially disrupted medial elastic fibers without inflammatory infiltrate, suggesting the diagnosis of a true arterial aneurysm.
PubMed ID
14614731 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage risk. A nationwide case-control study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275809
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2015 Nov;114(5):1064-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Anton Pottegård
Luis Alberto García Rodríguez
Frantz Rom Poulsen
Jesper Hallas
David Gaist
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2015 Nov;114(5):1064-75
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aspirin - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Drug Therapy, Combination - adverse effects
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neurosurgical Procedures
Postoperative Complications - prevention & control
Risk
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - epidemiology - etiology
Thrombosis - etiology - prevention & control
Ticlopidine - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Vitamin K - antagonists & inhibitors
Abstract
The study objective was to investigate the relationship between use of antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We identified patients discharged from Danish neurosurgery units with a first-ever SAH diagnosis in 2000 to 2012 (n=5,834). For each case, we selected 40 age-, sex- and period-matched population controls. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (aOR), adjusted for comorbidity, education level, and income. Low-dose aspirin (ASA) use for
PubMed ID
26202836 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arterial thromboembolic complications in patients with Björk-Shiley and Lillehei-Kaster aortic disc valve prostheses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249872
Source
Am Heart J. 1977 Jun;93(6):715-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1977
Author
J. Dale
Source
Am Heart J. 1977 Jun;93(6):715-22
Date
Jun-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Aortic Valve - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Valve Prosthesis - adverse effects - mortality
Humans
Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Thromboembolism - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
Arterial thromboembolic complications were studied in 196 patients who had either a single Björk-Shiley or Lillehei-Kaster aortic disc valve implanted. Eight patients suffered from such complications in the course of the first postoperative month and three of them died, two from myocardial infarction and one from cerebral embolism. Nineteen late thromboembolic complications developed in 18 of the 164 patients who survived the postoperative period, the incidence bein 5.9 episodes per 100 patients per year. The two valve types wer found to be equallly thrombogenic, and the rate was not lower than that in patients with Starr-Edwards aortic ball valves of series 2,300 previously studied. Particularly serious was valve malfunction caused by thrombi that limited the movement of the discs. Early recognition of this condition is essential, because the only effective therapy is removal of the thrombus. Three patients with a Björk-Shiley and one with a Lillehei-Kaster valve suffered this complecation and two died, while cerebral embolism caused a third late death. Two of the three patients who had not received anticoagulants developed thromboembolic complications, while most episodes occurred in spite of well-maintained anti-coagulant treatment. It is concluded that arterial thromboembolic complications remain a considerable problem also after aortic disc valve implantation, and that thrombotic valve malfunction is particularly serious and requires special attention.
PubMed ID
871099 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association of antibodies to cardiolipin, beta 2-glycoprotein I, prothrombin, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein with thrombosis in 292 patients with familial and sporadic systemic lupus erythematosus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178359
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2004;33(4):246-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
S. Koskenmies
O. Vaarala
E. Widen
J. Kere
T. Palosuo
H. Julkunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2004;33(4):246-52
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - analysis - immunology
Cardiolipins - analysis - immunology
Cohort Studies
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland
Glycoproteins - analysis - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Lipoproteins, LDL - analysis - immunology
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - genetics - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Oxidation-Reduction
Predictive value of tests
Prothrombin - analysis - immunology
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Thrombosis - etiology
beta 2-Glycoprotein I
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of antibodies to phospholipid-binding plasma proteins (aPL) and to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OX-LDL), and to study the association of these antibodies with thrombosis and coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
Clinical data and sera from 89 Finnish patients with familial and 203 with sporadic SLE were available for the study. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used for antibody determination.
The occurrence of thrombosis in our SLE patients was 13.7% (40/292) and of clinically diagnosed CHD was 1.4% (4/292). All antibody assays, except IgM-aCL, were significantly associated with thrombosis. IgG-aCL alone or in combination with anti beta 2-GPI or with anti OX-LDL were reasonably sensitive (38%, 48%, and 58%, respectively) and specific (87%, 80% and 72%, respectively) for a history of thrombosis. A high risk of arterial thrombosis (TIA or stroke) was associated with positivity of IgG-aCL, anti beta 2-GPI, and anti-prothrombin. Venous thrombosis was significantly associated with all other assays except IgM-aCL and anti-prothrombin. No test correlated with CHD, but the number of affected patients was small. There were three multiplex SLE families with two patients having a history of thrombosis: no consistent pattern of aPL or anti OX-LDL was found in these patients.
IgG-aCL alone or in combination with anti beta 2-GPI or anti OX-LDL are sensitive and specific tests for detecting SLE patients at increased risk of thrombosis. The aetiopathogenesis of thrombosis in familial SLE appears to be multifactorial.
PubMed ID
15370721 View in PubMed
Less detail

93 records – page 1 of 10.