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62 records – page 1 of 7.

[A 49 year old male with a giant pulmonary bulla--a case report and review of the literature]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91438
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Oct;94(10):673-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Asgeirsson Hilmar
Lúdvíksdóttir Dóra
Kjartansson Olafur
Gudbjartsson Tómas
Author Affiliation
Landspítala, Hringbraut, Reykjavik.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Oct;94(10):673-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blister - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Humans
Lung - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Lung Diseases - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy
Radiography, Thoracic
Spirometry
Thoracotomy
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A 49 year old previously healthy smoker was diagnosed with a giant bulla in his right lung, following a history of dry cough, repeated upper airway infections and increasing dyspnea for several years. Computed tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of a giant bulla in the right inferior lobe and several smaller bullae in the right superior lobe. The giant bulla was 17 cm in diameter, occupying more than half of the right hemithorax. On spirometry a moderate restrictive and a mild obstructive pattern was observed. Lung volume was measured with two different techniques, nitrogen washout and plethysmography, with volume of the bullae estimated at 2.9 L, similar to the 3.2 L determined by CT. The patient underwent thoracotomy, where the giant bulla together with the inferior lobe were removed with lobectomy and the small bullae in the superior lobe with wedge resection. Five months postoperatively the patient is in good health and is back at work. Postoperatively significant improvements in spirometry values and lung volume measurements have been documented. This case demonstrates that giant bullae can be successfully managed with surgical resection and their size can be determined by different techniques, including lung volume measurements and chest CT.
PubMed ID
18974430 View in PubMed
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Assessing non-resectability of lung cancer. The value of thoracic computed tomography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24745
Source
Rofo. 1991 Sep;155(3):218-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
S. Lähde
M. Päivänsalo
P. Rainio
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Central Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Rofo. 1991 Sep;155(3):218-22
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - radiography - surgery
Lymph Node Excision
Lymphatic Metastasis
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Pneumonectomy
Radiography, Thoracic
Retrospective Studies
Thoracotomy
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
To investigate whether the assessment of resectability of lung cancer can be reliably made on the basis of computed tomography (CT), the thoracic CT scans of 96 lung cancer patients who were operated on, and in whom the tumour was classified to be of stage III at preoperative CT or at thoracotomy, were analysed. Of the patients, 58 underwent complete resection of the tumour, whereas thoracotomy resulted in non-complete resection or exploration only in 38 cases. Overlapping of the CT findings in the groups of complete and non-successful resection was observed. The majority of tumours with apparent growth to the carina, trachea, oesophagus or great vessels at CT were completely resected. Tumours that only bordered on the pleura could not be distinguished from those with pleural invasion. Mediastinal lymph node enlargement did not always mean metastatic spread. We conclude that there is no definite sign that identifies non-resectability of lung tumours, and a certain proportion of non-curative thoracotomies must be accepted.
PubMed ID
1912539 View in PubMed
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Axel H. Cappelen, MD (1858-1919): first suture of a myocardial laceration from a cardiac stab wound.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170295
Source
J Trauma. 2006 Mar;60(3):653-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Kjetil Söreide
Jon Arne Söreide
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. ksoreide@mac.com
Source
J Trauma. 2006 Mar;60(3):653-4
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Vessels - injuries
Heart Injuries - history
Heart Ventricles - injuries
Hemothorax - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Norway
Sutures - history
Thoracotomy - history
Wounds, Stab - history
PubMed ID
16531871 View in PubMed
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Cardiac arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia after thoracotomy for lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224067
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 1992 Apr;53(4):642-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
J. von Knorring
M. Lepäntalo
L. Lindgren
O. Lindfors
Author Affiliation
IV Department of Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 1992 Apr;53(4):642-7
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - epidemiology
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology
Atrial Flutter - epidemiology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Electrocardiography
Exercise Test
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intraoperative Complications - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Pneumonectomy - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Tachycardia - epidemiology
Tachycardia, Supraventricular - epidemiology
Thoracotomy - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The records of 598 patients undergoing a thoracic surgical procedure for lung cancer from 1975 through 1989 were reviewed for occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias and myocardial ischemic events. Atrial tachycardias occurred in 16% (94/598); atrial fibrillation was preponderant (87%), followed by supraventricular tachycardia and atrial flutter. Patients with recurrent episodes of dysrhythmias had a significantly higher mortality rate than those without episodes or with a single episode only (17% versus 2.4%; p less than 0.01). Transient ischemic electrocardiographic changes were documented in 23 patients (3.8%) and myocardial infarction in 7 (1.2%). An abnormal preoperative exercise test result and intraoperative hypotension were strongly associated with both dysrhythmia and ischemia (p less than 0.01). Pneumonectomy, ischemic changes on the electrocardiogram, and cardiac enlargement were also associated with arrhythmias (p less than 0.01). A weaker association (p less than 0.05) was found between postoperative arrhythmias and old myocardial infarction (greater than 6 months), arterial hypertension, and heart failure. Pulmonary function had no predictive value in this respect. A history of angina or old myocardial infarction was predictive of transient postoperative myocardial ischemia but not myocardial infarction. Despite improved anesthetic and monitoring techniques and more frequent use of the intensive care unit postoperatively in the last decade, the incidence of arrhythmias after thoracotomy has not decreased. More effective prevention is needed, particularly for patients with defined preoperative and perioperative risk factors.
PubMed ID
1554274 View in PubMed
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Chronic pain after lung transplantation: a nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145292
Source
Clin J Pain. 2010 Mar-Apr;26(3):217-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kim Wildgaard
Martin Iversen
Henrik Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia double daggerDivision of Lung Transplantation, Heart Center Section for Surgical Pathophysiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. wildgaard@thoracotomy.eu
Source
Clin J Pain. 2010 Mar-Apr;26(3):217-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Aged
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Thoracotomy - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Little is known about persistent postsurgical pain after lung transplantation with the associated intensive and continuous immunosuppressive treatment. Therefore, we investigated the nationwide incidence of chronic pain after lung transplantations.
Detailed questionnaires were sent to all 110 Danish surviving recipients of lung transplantation from September 2002 to September 2007.
Seventy-nine patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria with a mean follow-up time of 39 months. Excluded patients were 1 death during survey, 14 with previous thoracic surgery, and 16 patients who did not respond to an initial mailed questionnaire or a reminder. Fourteen patients (18%) reported persistent pain, whereas only 8 patients (10%) reported pain score >3 (numeric rating scale 0 to 10) and 4 patients (5%) >5 (numeric rating scale 0 to 10). Seventy-one percent of the patients with postsurgical pain also had pain from another part of the body. In patients with persistent postsurgical pain, this was a limiting factor for daily social activities in 29% to 92% dependent on the activity and 54% in pain felt quality of life was compromised due to the pain. Seventy-three percent of persistent postsurgical pain patients (lateral thoracotomy) experienced sensory disturbances compared with 46% of nonpain patients.
Moderate-to-severe persistent postsurgical pain occurred in 5% to 10% of patients after lung transplantation, which is lower than reported after nontransplant thoracotomy. The specific role of the peritransplant immunosuppression on persistent post-thoracotomy pain should be explored further.
PubMed ID
20173435 View in PubMed
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The clinical effects and cost-avoidance of a change in perioperative bronchodilator use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217559
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1994 Aug;47(4):149-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
B. Zimmer
A C Casson
C D Bayliff
C F George
Author Affiliation
Victoria Hospital, London, Ontario.
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1994 Aug;47(4):149-53
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols - economics - therapeutic use
Albuterol - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - etiology
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cost Savings - statistics & numerical data
Drug Costs
Drug Utilization Review
Humans
Ontario
Postoperative Care - economics - standards
Preoperative Care - economics - standards
Surgery Department, Hospital - economics - standards
Thoracotomy - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The clinical effects and financial impact of a change in prescribing habits from routine to occasional use of perioperative bronchodilators, following the presentation of drug information, were assessed retrospectively by comparing the outcomes of patients admitted for major thoracic surgery. Eighteen of 24 (75%) patients in Period A (prior to change) received salbutamol bronchodilator therapy versus 10 of 17 (59%) in Period B (following the change) (p = .448). Of the patients who did receive salbutamol aerosols, the mean dose in grams per patient was greater in Period A than in Period B (6.85 +/- 5.96 vs. 2.64 +/- 4.44 respectively p
PubMed ID
10136950 View in PubMed
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A comparison of transthoracic and transhiatal resection for thoracic oesophageal cancer. Observations of 30 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24995
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1991;80(4):340-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
J. Mäkelä
S. Laitinen
M I Kairaluoma
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Central Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1991;80(4):340-5
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality - surgery
Comparative Study
Esophageal Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Esophagectomy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Survival Rate
Thoracotomy - methods
Abstract
The transthoracic and transhiatal resection techniques are compared using the 30-year experience of Oulu University Central Hospital. During the period 1960-1982 we favoured resections trough a transthoracic route, while during the period 1983-1989 a transhiatal route was preferred. This change, and the more enthusiastic attitude adopted towards resection, has lead to an increase in resectability from 23% (46/203) to 62% (43/69) (P less than 0.0001). The difference between radical resections, 50% (23/46) and 37% (16/43) has remained non-significant. Morbidity was higher after transthoracic than transhiatal resections, 57% (26/46) versus 42% (18/43), whereas mortality was nearly the same, 11% (5/46) and 9% (4/43). Postoperative pulmonary complications occurred in 28% (13/46) after transthoracic resection and in 14% (6/43) after transhiatal resection. No significant difference was detected in the development of late anastomotic strictures, 33% (15/46) and 30% (13/43), respectively. We conclude that transhiatal resection is as safe as transthoracic resection and seems to allow more resections to be carried out without any increase in mortality or morbidity, but long-term survival remains poor.
PubMed ID
1814256 View in PubMed
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[Comparison of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and limited axillary thoracotomy for spontaneous pneumothorax]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77703
Source
Laeknabladid. 2007 May;93(5):405-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Tomasdottir Gudrun Fonn
Torfason Bjarni
Isaksson Helgi J
Gudbjartsson Tomas
Author Affiliation
Laeknadeild Háskóla Islands, Landspítala, Reykjavík, Iceland. tomasgud@landspitali.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2007 May;93(5):405-12
Date
May-2007
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Length of Stay
Male
Pneumothorax - mortality - surgery
Recurrence
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted - adverse effects
Thoracotomy - adverse effects - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Historically, surgery for SP has been performed with open thoracotomy. Today video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has replaced open surgery for SP in most centers. Long-term results (i.e. recurrent pneumothorax) following VATS have been debated. In Iceland surgery for SP has been performed with both VATS and limited axillary thoracotomy (LAT). The aim of this study was to compare these two approaches, especially reoperations for prolonged airleakage and late recurrences. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a retrospective non-randomized study on all patients operated first time for SP at our institution between 1991-2005. Out of 210 patients that underwent 234 procedures (160 males, mean age 29 yrs.), 200 had primary SP (95%) and 10 secondary SP. The cases were divided into two groups; 134 VATS procedures and 100 thoracotomies (LAT). Three surgeons performed a LAT and four performed VATS. RESULTS: Wedge resection was performed in all cases and mechanical pleurodesis was added in 25% of the VATS and 67% of the LAT cases. Median operation time was 20 minutes longer for VATS (p=0.006). Reoperations for late recurrent pneumothorax were 10 vs. 3 in the VATS and LAT group, and reoperations for persistent airleakage 3 vs. 0, respectively (p=0.03). Operative mortality within 30 days from surgery was 0%. Median hospital stay was one day longer after LAT. CONCLUSION: Reoperations following VATS for SP are more common compared to open thoracotomy, explained by a higher rate of both late recurrent pneumothoraces and prolonged early postoperative airleakage. Both approaches are safe and major complications are infrequent. Hospital stay is shorter after VATS, however, VATS takes longer and the higher reoperation rate is a shortcoming and is of concern.
PubMed ID
17502683 View in PubMed
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Consequences of persistent pain after lung cancer surgery: a nationwide questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139305
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2011 Jan;55(1):60-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
K. Wildgaard
J. Ravn
L. Nikolajsen
E. Jakobsen
T S Jensen
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Section for Surgical Pathophysiology, Departments of Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark. wildgaard@thoracotomy.edu
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2011 Jan;55(1):60-8
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pain, Postoperative - epidemiology - pathology - psychology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Thoracotomy - adverse effects
Abstract
post-thoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) and its social consequences have been inconsistently investigated as most studies were either small sized, focused on a limited number of risk factors or included heterogeneous surgical procedures. The current objectives were to obtain detailed information on the consequences of PTPS after thoracotomy and video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) from homogenous unselected nationwide data, and to suggest mechanisms for the development of PTPS.
data from 1327 patients were collected using a prospective national database and combined with a detailed questionnaire.
the response rate was 81.5%, resulting in 546 patients without prior thoracic surgery for the final analysis. Follow-up was 22 months (range 12-36). PTPS occurred in 33% thoracotomy patients and 25% VATS patients. Clinically relevant pain was present in 11-18% of the patients and severe pain in 4-12% depending on the level of physical activity. In PTPS patients, 64% also had pain from other locations on the body. Perceived sensory changes in the thoracic area were present in 63% of PTPS patients vs. 25% in pain-free patients (P
PubMed ID
21077845 View in PubMed
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[Diagnosis and treatment heart and pericardium wounds].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195722
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2001;(1):18-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A S Ermolov
M M Abakumov
Iu A Radchenko
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2001;(1):18-21
Date
2001
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods
Diagnosis, Differential
Echocardiography
Heart Injuries - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Humans
Pericardium - injuries
Radiography, Thoracic
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Rate
Thoracotomy - methods
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds, Penetrating - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Abstract
The experience of diagnosis and treatment of heart and pericardium wounds in 152 patients are presented. In obecure diagnosis the authors prefer X-ray examination and echocardiography. Total lethality was 23.6%. Its high level is due to injury of coronary arteries and intracardiac structures, other thoracic and abdominal organs. The left anterolaferal thoracotomy is the optimum approach in wounds of the heart and pericardium. The most frequent complication of postoperative period is pericarditis, its echographic symptoms were revealed in 91% examinys. Non-steroid and steroid antiinflammatory drugs are effective for prophylaxis and treatment of pericarditis.
PubMed ID
11210308 View in PubMed
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62 records – page 1 of 7.