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162 records – page 1 of 17.

Advance directives for resuscitation and other life-saving or sustaining measures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224132
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Mar 15;146(6):1072A-B
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1992

Advance directives: patient preferences in family practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229101
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1990 May;36:876-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
John P Sloan
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1990 May;36:876-8
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives
Aged
Attitude
Canada
Data Collection
Decision Making
Euthanasia, Passive
Family
Family Practice
Humans
Life Support Care
Patient Care
Patients
Terminal Care
Third-Party Consent
Abstract
The author reports on six months' experience of obtaining advance directives from patients for care in a family practice. Patients were questioned about their preferences for comfort or prolonging life and then were asked to delegate a substitute decision maker. Of 20 patients, all who responded chose comfort over prolonging life. Delegated substitute decision makers included spouses, children, and professionals or friends. In this population, patients overwhelmingly favoured comfort over prolonging life in the event that they might be irreversibly disabled, and they tended to choose spouses or other first-degree relatives as substitute decision makers.
Notes
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Cites: Med Law. 1989;7(5):457-652493552
PubMed ID
11653912 View in PubMed
Less detail

An Act (S.N.S., 1988, Chapter 14) respecting consent to medical treatment (the Medical Consent Act)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103307
Source
Int Dig Health Legis. 1990;41(1):91-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

An observational study of the level at which parents participate in decisions during their child's hospitalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31632
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2002 Mar;9(2):202-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Inger Hallström
Ingrid Runeson
Gunnel Elander
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital, S-221 85 Lund, Sweden. Inger.Hallstrom@skane.se
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2002 Mar;9(2):202-14
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Hospitalized
Child, Preschool
Communication
Consumer Satisfaction
Decision Making
Family Health
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Parents - psychology
Patient Participation
Professional-Family Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Third-Party Consent
Abstract
When a child is hospitalized, the parents find themselves in an unfamiliar environment and their parental role changes. They are in a stressful and often anxiety-filled situation and it may be difficult for them to participate in decisions. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which parents participate in decisions during the course of events when their child is hospitalized. Thirty-five parents of 24 children (aged 5 months to 18 years) were followed by mobile observation during their child's hospitalization in a paediatric department in Sweden. Three researchers analysed field notes in three steps, using manifest and latent coding. In step 1, 119 situations that included a decision process were identified. In step 2, the situations were assessed according to a five-level scale concerning how the parents' wishes, desires or values had been respected. In step 3, each situation was scrutinized with respect to factors influencing the extent of the parents' participation. The results showed that parents have varying ability to be involved in decision making. Professionals need to communicate more openly with them in order to identify and satisfy their needs because some parents are unwilling or incapable of expressing them.
PubMed ID
11944209 View in PubMed
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Artificial feeding for severely disoriented, elderly patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230801
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1989 May;35:1057-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989
Author
Neil H McAlister
Nazlin K McAlister
Catherine G Challin
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1989 May;35:1057-62
Date
May-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives
Aged
Altruism
Beneficence
Canada
Coercion
Conscience
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cultural Diversity
Decision Making
Dementia
Equipment and Supplies
Ethics
Euthanasia, Passive
Humans
Jurisprudence
Life Support Care
Mental Competency
Nutritional Support
Paternalism
Patient Care
Physicians
Right to Die
Risk
Risk assessment
Social Values
Third-Party Consent
Treatment Refusal
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
The issue of artificial feeding for patients with dementia who refuse feeding by hand is a wrenching emotional problem that can cloud clinical judgement. It is helpful to apply an analytic approach to decision making. There are five steps: gathering a comprehensive clinical database; defining the goal of treatment; knowing the treatment options available, their burdens and potential benefits; understanding the law; and defining the moral framework in which care is being given. Such an approach can be used to formulate a plan of treatment in the best interests of incompetent elderly patients who cannot speak for themselves.
Notes
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Cites: Law Med Health Care. 1987 Fall;15(3):110-73695573
PubMed ID
11659211 View in PubMed
Less detail

162 records – page 1 of 17.