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162 records – page 1 of 17.

The beneficial role of a judicial process when "everything" is too much?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155004
Source
Healthc Q. 2008;11(4):46-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Mark Handelman
Bob Parke
Author Affiliation
Ontario Consent and Capacity Board, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Healthc Q. 2008;11(4):46-50
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Decision Making
Humans
Patient Participation
Terminal Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Third-Party Consent
Abstract
This narrative is written with the intent to encourage physicians as well as other healthcare professionals to use judicial processes, such as those provided by the Ontario Consent and Capacity Board, to help resolve conflict with treatment decisions between care providers and decision-makers. Through the presentation of a fictional yet common case scenario, it is argued that after all attempts at mediation have been attempted that the timely use of a third party is in the patient's, the family's and the healthcare team's best interests.
PubMed ID
18818529 View in PubMed
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An Act (S.N.S., 1988, Chapter 14) respecting consent to medical treatment (the Medical Consent Act)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103307
Source
Int Dig Health Legis. 1990;41(1):91-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

Supreme Court requires consent for sterilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236325
Source
Can Hum Rights Advocate. 1986 Nov;2(10):7-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1986

Canada's Supreme Court rejects ex-lover's effort to halt abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230352
Source
N Y Times Web. 1989 Aug 9;:A1, A3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-9-1989

The practice of consenting to electroconvulsive therapy in the European Union.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126888
Source
J ECT. 2012 Mar;28(1):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Gábor Gazdag
Rozália Takács
Gabor S Ungvari
Pascal Sienaert
Author Affiliation
Consultation-Liaison Psychiatric Service, Szent István and Szent László Hospitals, Budapest, Hungary. gazdag@lamb.hu
Source
J ECT. 2012 Mar;28(1):4-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consent Forms
Electroconvulsive Therapy - ethics - standards
Electronic Mail
European Union
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Informed consent
Norway
Switzerland
Third-Party Consent
Abstract
To survey major aspects of obtaining informed consent to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the countries of the European Union.
Leading professionals in the field of biological psychiatry in all European Union countries and Norway and Switzerland were approached by e-mail asking about the national practice of obtaining consent to ECT including the form of consent, the legality of consent by proxy, and consent to anesthesia and maintenance treatment.
A considerable diversity was found across Europe regarding consent to ECT. In Slovenia and Luxembourg, ECT is not available at all. Informed consent is needed in written form in most European countries except for Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Slovakia, where verbal consent is sufficient. Italy, Ireland, and Latvia are stricter in their approach because separate written consent is required before each ECT session.
The practice of obtaining informed consent varies from country to country reflecting the individual European Union countries' jurisdiction and their sociocultural traditions as well as their different development of psychiatric services. In line with the increasing cooperation in health care, developing a unified way of obtaining consent for ECT is recommended.
PubMed ID
22343577 View in PubMed
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Obtaining informed consent from continuing care residents: issues and recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186454
Source
Can J Aging. 2001;20(3):385-406
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
L. Stelmach
C. Konnert
K. Dobson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. lddalzel@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2001;20(3):385-406
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Comprehension
Disclosure - standards
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Informed Consent - standards
Mental Competency - standards
Proxy
Residential Facilities
Third-Party Consent
Abstract
As the number of older adults residing in continuing care facilities increases, mental health professionals will provide more services and conduct more research in this setting. Mental health professionals working with continuing care residents will find themselves regularly challenged by ethical issues, particularly obtaining informed consent. Characteristics of the continuing care setting and residents make obtaining informed consent especially challenging. Mental health professionals must overcome these challenges in order to fulfill the following three requirements of informed consent: (1) the client is competent, (2) the client is provided with sufficient information, and (3) the client has not been coerced and/or the consent is voluntary. This article will examine the issues surrounding the fulfillment of these requirements in a continuing care facility, and will provide suggestions and guidelines that mental health professionals can utilize during the informed consent process.
PubMed ID
12611405 View in PubMed
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162 records – page 1 of 17.