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Acute effects of mustard, horseradish, black pepper and ginger on energy expenditure, appetite, ad libitum energy intake and energy balance in human subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120287
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):556-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2013
Author
N T Gregersen
A. Belza
M G Jensen
C. Ritz
C. Bitz
O. Hels
E. Frandsen
D J Mela
A. Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):556-63
Date
Feb-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Appetite Regulation
Armoracia - chemistry
Black Pepper - adverse effects
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Ginger - chemistry
Humans
Hyperphagia - prevention & control
Lunch
Male
Mustard Plant - chemistry
Postprandial Period
Single-Blind Method
Spices - adverse effects
Thermogenesis
Young Adult
Abstract
Chilli peppers have been shown to enhance diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and reduce energy intake (EI) in some studies, but there are few data on other pungent spices. The primary aim of the present study was to test the acute effects of black pepper (pepper), ginger, horseradish and mustard in a meal on 4 h postprandial DIT. The secondary aim was to examine the effects on subjective appetite measures, ad libitum EI and energy balance. In a five-way placebo-controlled, single-blind, cross-over trial, twenty-two young (age 24·9 (SD 4·6) years), normal-weight (BMI 21·8 (SD 2·1) kg/m²) males were randomly assigned to receive a brunch meal with either pepper (1·3 g), ginger (20 g), horseradish (8·3 g), mustard (21 g) or no spices (placebo). The amounts of spices were chosen from pre-testing to make the meal spicy but palatable. No significant treatment effects were observed on DIT, but mustard produced DIT, which tended to be larger than that of placebo (14 %, 59 (SE 3) v. 52 (SE 2) kJ/h, respectively, P=0·08). No other spice induced thermogenic effects approaching statistical significance. Subjective measures of appetite (P>0·85), ad libitum EI (P=0·63) and energy balance (P=0·67) also did not differ between the treatments. Finally, horseradish decreased heart rate (P=0·048) and increased diastolic blood pressure (P= 0·049) compared with placebo. In conclusion, no reliable treatment effects on appetite, EI or energy balance were observed, although mustard tended to be thermogenic at this dose. Further studies should explore the possible strength and mechanisms of the potential thermogenic effect of mustard actives, and potential enhancement by, for example, combinations with other food components.
PubMed ID
23021155 View in PubMed
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The arrestin domain-containing 3 protein regulates body mass and energy expenditure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130643
Source
Cell Metab. 2011 Nov 2;14(5):671-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-2011
Author
Parth Patwari
Valur Emilsson
Eric E Schadt
William A Chutkow
Samuel Lee
Alessandro Marsili
Yongzhao Zhang
Radu Dobrin
David E Cohen
P Reed Larsen
Ann Marie Zavacki
Loren G Fong
Stephen G Young
Richard T Lee
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. parth@alum.mit.edu
Source
Cell Metab. 2011 Nov 2;14(5):671-83
Date
Nov-2-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue, Brown - metabolism
Adipose Tissue, White - metabolism
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - pharmacology
Animals
Arrestins - genetics - metabolism
Body mass index
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5
Cohort Studies
Energy Metabolism - genetics
Female
Genetic Loci
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Mice
Mice, Knockout
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta - metabolism
Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Sex Factors
Signal Transduction
Thermogenesis - genetics
Abstract
A human genome-wide linkage scan for obesity identified a linkage peak on chromosome 5q13-15. Positional cloning revealed an association of a rare haplotype to high body-mass index (BMI) in males but not females. The risk locus contains a single gene, "arrestin domain-containing 3" (ARRDC3), an uncharacterized a-arrestin. Inactivating Arrdc3 in mice led to a striking resistance to obesity, with greater impact on male mice. Mice with decreased ARRDC3 levels were protected from obesity due to increased energy expenditure through increased activity levels and increased thermogenesis of both brown and white adipose tissues. ARRDC3 interacted directly with ß-adrenergic receptors, and loss of ARRDC3 increased the response to ß-adrenergic stimulation in isolated adipose tissue. These results demonstrate that ARRDC3 is a gender-sensitive regulator of obesity and energy expenditure and reveal a surprising diversity for arrestin family protein functions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21982743 View in PubMed
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Bioactive food stimulants of sympathetic activity: effect on 24-h energy expenditure and fat oxidation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61489
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jun;59(6):733-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
A. Belza
A B Jessen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Centre for Advanced Food Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark. anbe@kvl.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jun;59(6):733-41
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caffeine - pharmacology
Calcium, Dietary - pharmacology
Calorimetry, Indirect
Capsaicin - pharmacology
Catechin - pharmacology
Central Nervous System Stimulants - pharmacology
Cross-Over Studies
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Energy Metabolism - drug effects - physiology
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Obesity - drug therapy
Oxidation-Reduction
Plant Extracts
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration - drug effects
Tea
Thermogenesis - drug effects
Tyrosine - pharmacology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Bioactive food ingredients influence energy balance by exerting weak thermogenic effects. We studied whether the thermogenic effect of a combination of capsaicin, green tea extract (catechins and caffeine), tyrosine, and calcium was maintained after 7-day treatment and whether local effects in the gastric mucosa were involved in the efficacy. DESIGN: The present study was designed as a 3-way crossover, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded intervention.SETTING: Department of Human Nutrition, RVAU, Denmark. SUBJECTS: A total of 19 overweight to obese men (BMI: 28.0+/-2.7 kg/m2) were recruited by advertising locally. INTERVENTION: The subjects took the supplements for a period of 7 days. The supplements were administrated as a simple supplement with the bioactive ingredients, a similar enterocoated version, or placebo. In all, 24-h energy expenditure (EE), substrate oxidations, spontaneous physical activity (SPA), and heart rate were measured in respiration chambers on the seventh day of each test period.Results:After adjustment for changes in body weight and SPA, 24-h EE was increased by 160 kJ/day (95% CI: 15-305) by the simple preparation as compared to placebo, whereas the enterocoated preparation had no such effect (53 kJ/day, -92 to 198); simple vs enterocoated versions (P=0.09). The simple preparation produced a deficit in 24-h energy balance of 193 kJ/day (49-338, P=0.03). Fat and carbohydrate oxidation were equally increased by the supplements.CONCLUSION: A supplement containing bioactive food ingredients increased daily EE by approximately 200 kJ or 2%, without raising the heart rate or any observed adverse effects. The lack of effect of the enterocoated preparation suggests that a local action of capsaicin in the gastric mucosa is a prerequisite for exerting the thermogenic effect.
PubMed ID
15870822 View in PubMed
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Source
Pages 231-238 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
difficulty in carrying out skilled tasks. If the individual is unprepared for cold exposure, or needs the mobility of light clothing, then heat produc- tion must be boosted by an increase of metabolism, through some combination of physical activity, shiver- ing, and non-shivering thermogenesis. The
  1 document  
Author
Shephard, R.J.
Goode, R.C.
Author Affiliation
School of Physical and Health Education and Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada
Source
Pages 231-238 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acclimatization
Cold adaptation
Energy balance
Fat loss
Glycogen loss
Heat production
Homeothermic system
Metabolism
Non-shivering thermogenesis
Shivering
Thermal equilibrium
Thermographic studies
Voluntary activity
Documents
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Commentaries -- Biorhythms, cold physiology, and pathology

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94097
Source
Pages 71-77 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
  1 document  
Source
Pages 71-77 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Brown adipose tissue (BAT)
Cardiovascular response
Cold acclimation
Cold diuresis
Cortisol
Inguinal white fat (IWF)
Linoleic Acid
Linolenic acid
Muscular activity
Non-shivering thermogenesis
Norepinephrine infusion
Palmitic Acid
Palmitoleic acid
Perirenal white fat (PWF)
Rectal temperature
Renal response
Skin temperatures
Sleep pattern
Notes
"Renal response and lipid change during cold acclimation of rodents" (G.E. Folk, Jr. and J.J. Berberich)
"Physiological responses to cooling of the face" (J. LeBlanc)
"Adaptive changes in rats reared in cold for successive generations" (S. Itoh, K. Moriya, and H. Maekubo)
"Seasonal patterns of sleep stages and secretion of cortisol and growth hormone during 24-hour periods in northern Norway" (Elliot D. Weitzman, Andries S. deGraaf, Jon F. Sassin, Tormar Hansen, Ole B. Godtlibsen, and Leon Hellman)
"Protection against extreme cold - 10 clo of insulation?" (R.F. Goldman)
"Thermographic (infrared) evaluation of frostbite" (M.P. Hamlet)
"Circadian and seasonal hormone cycles in Caucasian males in the arctic and subarctic" (Betty Anne Philip and Donald E. Roberts)
"Biorhythmologic study of man's adaptation to the conditions of the Far North" (M.G. Kolpakov)
Documents
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Effects of different mitochondrial thermogenic systems on the temperature of winter wheat seedlings exposed to cold shock.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75510
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2001 May-Jun;378:262-4
Publication Type
Article

Fatty acid metabolism during norepinephrine-induced thermogenesis in the cold-acclimatized rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297231
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report AAL-TDR-61-48.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 1962
Author
Hannon, J.P.
Larson, Anna M.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report AAL-TDR-61-48.
Date
May 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Fatty acids
Metabolism
Cold Temperature
Norepinephrine
Thermogenesis
Less detail
Source
Pages 29-31 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49 (2 Suppl):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
, whereafter the physiological responses to cold are attenuated and cold exposure is subjectively considered less stressful. Key words: cold, thermoreceptor, thermogenesis, thermoregulation, cold, vasocons triction, vasodilatation INTRODUCTION Human thermal responses to cold are similar to those of
  1 document  
Author
Rintamaki, H.
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu, Finland
Source
Pages 29-31 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49 (2 Suppl):29-31
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cold
Thermogenesis
Thermoreceptor
Thermoregulation
Vasoconstriction
Vasodilatation
Abstract
The thermoneutral ambient temperature for naked and resting humans is ca. 27 degrees C. Exposure to cold stimulates cold receptors of the skin which causes cold thermal sensations and stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic stimulation causes vasoconstriction in skin, arms and legs. Diminished skin and extremity blood flow increases the thermal insulation of superficial tissues more than 300% corresponding to 0.9 clo (0.13 degrees C x m(-2) x W(-1)). With thermoregulatory vasoconstriction/ vasodilatation the body heat balance can be maintained within a range of ca. 4 degrees C, the middle of the range being at ca. 21 degrees C when light clothing is used. Below the thermoneutral zone metabolic heat production (shivering) is stimulated and above the zone starts heat loss by evaporation (sweating). Cold induced vasoconstriction increases blood pressure and viscosity and decreases plasma volume consequently increasing cardiac work. Cold induced hypertensive response can be counteracted by light exercise, while starting heavy work in cold markedly increases blood pressure. Under very cold conditions the sympathetic stimulation opens the anastomoses between arterioles and venules which increases skin temperatures markedly but temporarily, especially in finger tips. Adaptation to cold takes ca. 2 weeks, whereafter the physiological responses to cold are attenuated and cold exposure is subjectively considered less stressful.
PubMed ID
17929604 View in PubMed
Documents
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Incidental movement, lifestyle-embedded activity and sleep: new frontiers in physical activity assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159200
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007;98 Suppl 2:S208-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Mark S Tremblay
Dale W Esliger
Angelo Tremblay
Rachel Colley
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. mark.tremblay@statcan.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007;98 Suppl 2:S208-17
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Guidelines as Topic
Health Planning Guidelines
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Motor Activity
Movement - physiology
Public Health
Sleep - physiology
Social Marketing
Thermogenesis
Abstract
Canadian public health messages relating to physical activity have historically focused on the prescription of purposeful exercise, most often assessing leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). Although LTPA contributes to total energy expenditure (TEE), a large part of the day remains neglected unless one also considers the energy expended outside of purposeful exercise. This paper reviews the potential impact of incidental (non-exercise or non-purposeful) physical activity and lifestyle-embedded activities (chores and incidental walking) upon TEE and indicators of health. Given that incidental movement occurs sporadically throughout the day, this form of energy expenditure is perhaps most vulnerable to increasingly ubiquitous mechanization and automation. The paper also explores the relationship of physical inactivity, including sleep, to physical activity, TEE, and health outcomes. Suggestions are provided for a more comprehensive physical activity recommendation that includes all components of TEE. Objective physical activity monitors with time stamps are considered as a better means to capture and examine human movements over the entire day.
PubMed ID
18213950 View in PubMed
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The influence of cold on energy expenditure at rest and during exercise in person in the North.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84554
Source
Pages 231-236 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):231-236
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
  1 document  
Author
Grishin, O.V.
Ustuzaninova, N.V.
Author Affiliation
SI Research Institute for Physiology SB RAMS, Novosibirsk, Russia
Source
Pages 231-236 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49(2 Suppl):231-236
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Anoxia
Cold - adverse effects
Cold Climate
Energy Metabolism
Exercise - physiology
Geography
Humans
Oxygen consumption
Rest
Thermogenesis
Abstract
In the majority of research on human adaptation in the North signs of hypoxia were found. In physiology studies of animals it is established that adaptive changes to cold and hypoxia have much in common, for example, the decrease of spent energy (hypometabolism). This phenomenon has been studied much less in humans than in animals. The first study was that of A. Hemingway and L. Birzis which showed that under the influence of air temperature of -3 degrees C on natives of Kalahari deserts the average body temperature and level of metabolism decrease. The reduction of lung ventilation and decrease of heat loss in humans was interpreted as the result of cold. However, it is obvious that ventilation decrease in humans in cold air leads to reduction of oxygen consumption, i.e. to hypoxia. It is possible to assume that adaptation of Northerners is closely connected with cold and hypoxia. At hypoxia and under cold conditions the decrease of energy expenditure is the natural phenomenon. Y. Gauiter and M. Bonora, S. Wood consider that the fall of body temperature observable at hypoxia is a consequence of the decrease in oxygen consumption and reduction of energy expenditure. Besides, the decrease in oxygen consumption (Vo2) always precedes the fall of body temperature. In the work of C. Pedraz, J. Mortola it is shown that the external warming at hypoxia in newborn cats and dogs during restoration of body temperature up to the reference values is not accompanied by authentic change of metabolism. It remains lowered as under the previous conditions of hypoxia (before warming). It specifies that the fall in body temperature at hypoxia is a consequence instead of the reason of Vo2 fall. This is an important question for the human's adaptation--the influence of cold and hypoxia on spent energy. The paper presents the results of research into the effects of cold on resting and exercise energy expenditure among Northerners of the Russian North.
PubMed ID
17929639 View in PubMed
Documents
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19 records – page 1 of 2.