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42 records – page 1 of 5.

Source
Transplant Proc. 1992 Oct;24(5):2218-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Source
Semin Surg Oncol. 1996 Jan-Feb;12(1):32-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Blichert-Toft
H. Mouridsen
K W Andersen
Author Affiliation
Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group, Rigshopitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Semin Surg Oncol. 1996 Jan-Feb;12(1):32-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Denmark
Disclosure
Female
Humans
Informed consent
Patient Selection
Physician's Role
Prognosis
Random Allocation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research Subjects
Therapeutic Human Experimentation
Abstract
The randomized clinical trial is a scientific method for solving clinical problems. The method is typically employed before a new type of treatment is offered on a major scale in order to safeguard patients against a less curative therapy. Especially with regard to cancer treatment, randomized studies are conducted in increasing numbers. However, there remains a considerable discrepancy between the actual number of patients entered in randomized trials and the eligible number available. The demand of obtaining informed consent is a major reason for not entering patients into randomized studies. The critical item is whether information about randomization as a method for allocation should be disclosed to the patient. The doctor feels embarrassed not to be able to advise and support the patient in decision making about treatment and finds his or her role as the caring doctor replaced by the roulette. The requirement to seek informed consent has increased the rate of denial to participate in randomized trials from a few percent, up to about 50% or even higher.
PubMed ID
8821407 View in PubMed
Less detail

A dangerous method? Psychedelic therapy at Modum Bad, Norway, 1961-76.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307334
Source
Hist Psychiatry. 2020 Jun; 31(2):217-226
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Petter Grahl Johnstad
Author Affiliation
University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Hist Psychiatry. 2020 Jun; 31(2):217-226
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Hallucinogens - adverse effects - history - therapeutic use
History, 20th Century
Hospitals, Psychiatric - history
Humans
Lysergic Acid Diethylamide - history - therapeutic use
Malpractice - history
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - history
Norway
Psychiatry - history
Therapeutic Human Experimentation - history
Abstract
After many years of disregard, the use of psychedelic drugs in psychiatric treatment has re-emerged in recent years. The prospect that psychedelics may again be integrated into mainstream psychiatry has aroused interest in long-forgotten research and experience from the previous phase of psychedelic therapy, which lasted from the late 1940s to the 1970s. This article will discuss one large-scale psychedelic therapy programme at Modum Bad Nervesanatorium, a psychiatric clinic which treated 379 inpatients with psychedelic drugs during the years 1961-76. The psychiatrists there initially regarded the psychedelic treatment as efficacious and without serious negative reactions, but reports of long-term harm have since surfaced. This article discusses how insights from Modum Bad might benefit the new generation of psychedelic treatment efforts.
PubMed ID
31928087 View in PubMed
Less detail

Danish patients' attitudes to scientific-ethical questions. An interview study focusing therapeutic trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241010
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1984;215(2):99-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
N. Saurbrey
J. Jensen
P. Elmegaard Rasmussen
T. Gjørup
H. Guldager
P. Riis
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1984;215(2):99-104
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Disclosure
Ethics Committees, Clinical
Ethics Committees, Research
Ethics, Medical
Female
Humans
Informed consent
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Therapeutic Human Experimentation
Abstract
One hundred and fourteen in- and out-patients from a department of internal medicine were interviewed, on the basis of a questionnaire with the following key questions: 1) Their attitudes to medical trials with man as the subject. 2) Their emphasis on informed consent. 3) Their attitudes to inclusion of patients not being able to give informed consent. 4) Their attitudes to tentative participation in 4 concrete projects. In all, 98% considered doctors' and patients' collaboration on new therapeutical methods both necessary and desirable. Eighty-eight per cent considered information of patients participating in trials a prerequisite. Eighty-six per cent accepted participation in scientific trials based on the guarantee of the doctors responsible. Of these 86%, 58% felt that a scientific-ethical committee's accept of the project implied an extra element of security. Seventy-five per cent replied that patients not being able to give informed consent themselves could be included in scientific trials. The majority, 77%, added that patients' relatives would then have to accept, 20% that such trials could be based on the participating doctors' responsibility, and only 2% that such a responsibility was to place on scientific-ethical committees. In the 4 concrete projects, answers followed a uniform trend: full information of patients was demanded by approximately 80%, and acceptance of participation resting with responsible doctors in more than 80%. Less than half of these 80% felt that evaluation by a scientific-ethical committee would add to patients' security.
PubMed ID
6702499 View in PubMed
Less detail

Debate about placebos points to issue surrounded by many shades of grey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210566
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 15;155(10):1475-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1996
Author
N. Baer
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 15;155(10):1475-6
Date
Nov-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Control Groups
Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic - methods
Depression - therapy
Drugs, Investigational - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Ethics, Medical
Government Regulation
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mentally Ill Persons
Patient Selection
Placebos
Risk assessment
Therapeutic Human Experimentation
Abstract
Dr. Kenneth Rothman, a critic of the use of placebos in clinical trials, recently discussed the issue with Health Canada employees. Some researchers insist this is not a black-and-white issue, and that in some cases patients who receive a placebo are the lucky ones.
PubMed ID
8943938 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.