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The Reading the Mind in the Eyes test: validation of a French version and exploration of cultural variations in a multi-ethnic city.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108100
Source
Cogn Neuropsychiatry. 2014;19(3):189-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Marie Prevost
Marie-Eve Carrier
Gabrielle Chowne
Phyllis Zelkowitz
Lawrence Joseph
Ian Gold
Author Affiliation
a Leacock Building, Room 908, Departments of Philosophy and Psychiatry , 855 Sherbrooke West, McGill University , Montreal , Quebec H3A 2T7 , Canada.
Source
Cogn Neuropsychiatry. 2014;19(3):189-204
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Empathy
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Humans
Language
Male
Ontario
Psychometrics - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Theory of Mind
Vocabulary
Abstract
The first aim of our study was to validate the French version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test, a theory of mind test. The second aim was to test whether cultural differences modulate performance on this test.
A total of 109 participants completed the original English version and 97 participants completed the French version. Another group of 30 participants completed the French version twice, one week apart.
We report a similar overall distribution of scores in both versions and no differences in the mean scores between them. However, 2 items in the French version did not collect a majority of responses, which differed from the results of the English version. Test-retest showed good stability of the French version. As expected, participants who do not speak French or English at home, and those born in Asia, performed worse than North American participants, and those who speak English or French at home.
We report a French version with acceptable validity and good stability. The cultural differences observed support the idea that Asian culture does not use theory of mind to explain people's behaviours as much as North American people do.
PubMed ID
23937473 View in PubMed
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Theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alström syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257983
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2014 Mar;78(3):530-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Hans Erik Frölander
Claes Möller
Jan D Marshall
Annette Sundqvist
Berit Rönnåsen
Lil Falkensson
Björn Lyxell
Author Affiliation
Health Academy, Örebro University, Örebro SE 701 82, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro SE 701 85, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD) Graduate School, Linköping, Sweden. Electronic address: hans-erik.frolander@spsm.se.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2014 Mar;78(3):530-6
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alstrom Syndrome - diagnosis - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Cognition Disorders - physiopathology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - diagnosis - therapy
Hearing Tests - methods
Humans
Male
Memory, Short-Term
Multivariate Analysis
Neuropsychological Tests
Reference Values
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Theory of Mind
Vocabulary
Young Adult
Abstract
The study focuses on theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alström syndrome (ALMS). ALMS, an autosomal recessive syndrome causes juvenile blindness, sensorineural hearing loss, cardiomyopathy, endocrinological disorders and metabolic dysfunction. Theory-of-mind (ToM) refers to the ability to impute mental states to one self and to others. Clinical observations have revealed an increased occurrence of deviances in mental state understanding in ALMS. In the present study ToM will be examined and related to working memory (WM), verbal ability and sensory loss.
Twelve young individuals (16-37 years) with ALMS and 24 nondisabled individuals matched on age, gender and educational level participated. ToM was assessed by means of a multiple task that taxes the ability to understand thoughts and feelings of story characters'. WM was examined by means of a reading span task and verbal ability by means of a vocabulary test.
The ALMS group performed at significantly lower levels in ToM tasks and displayed a higher variability in performance than the control group. Individuals with ALMS and a relatively poor level performance provided fewer correct mental state inferences in ToM tasks than ALMS individuals with relatively higher performance levels. ALMS individuals with relatively high performance levels made as many correct inferences in ToM tasks as the control group, but their inferences were more often incomplete. Vocabulary skills and educational level, but not WM-capacity predicted ToM performance. Degree of deafblindness did not have an impact on ToM. Age of onset of visual loss but not hearing loss related to ToM.
The individuals with ALMS display a high degree of heterogeneity in terms of ToM, where some individuals reached performance levels comparable to nondisabled individuals. The results are discussed with respect to how cognitive and verbal abilities and factors related to the disability affect ToM.
PubMed ID
24485176 View in PubMed
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