Skip header and navigation

Refine By

87 records – page 1 of 9.

Abortion in Thailand and Sweden: health services and short-term consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65618
Source
Ciba Found Symp. 1985;115:54-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
T N Singnomklao
Source
Ciba Found Symp. 1985;115:54-66
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Criminal
Abortion, Induced - methods - trends
Abortion, Legal
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Massage
Medicine, Traditional
Pregnancy
Risk
Rural Health - trends
Sweden
Thailand
Abstract
In Thailand, where abortion is still illegal, abortion services (health services) outside Bangkok, and outside hospitals or clinics, are provided by non-physician practitioners. In the studies reported here, those practitioners were interviewed in 1978 and 1981 about their methods and the characteristics of their clients. The first study revealed that massage is the method most widely used by rural practitioners and that uterine injection with different solutions comes second. The second study was in agreement with these findings. The health consequences of these induced abortions were studied by interviewing the clients of the rural practitioners in 1980 and 1981. In Sweden, where abortion has been legal for quite a long time, all women who need an abortion have access to safe and convenient health services throughout the country.
PubMed ID
3849419 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attack rates of dengue fever in Swedish travellers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260850
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;46(6):412-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Joacim Rocklöv
Wolfgang Lohr
Marika Hjertqvist
Annelies Wilder-Smith
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;46(6):412-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bangladesh - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Dengue - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Sri Lanka - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Thailand - epidemiology
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Travel Medicine
Young Adult
Abstract
Dengue is endemic in many countries visited by Swedish travellers. We aimed to determine the attack rate of dengue in Swedish travellers and analyse the trends over time and the geographical variation.
We obtained the following data from the Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control for the y 1995-2010: number of Swedish residents with confirmed dengue, the country and year of infection. We also obtained registers on the Swedish annual air traveller arrivals to dengue endemic areas from the United Nations World Tourist Organization for the time period. We estimated attack rates with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
In total, 925 Swedish travellers with confirmed dengue were reported. We found an increasing trend over time for most destinations. The majority of the dengue cases were acquired in Thailand (492 out of 925 travellers; 53%), with an attack rate of 13.6 (95% CI 12.7, 14.4) per 100,000 travellers. However, the 2 highest attack rates per 100,000 travellers were found for Sri Lanka (45.3, 95% CI 34.3, 56.4) and Bangladesh (42.6, 95% CI 23.8, 61.5).
Information on attack rates in travellers is more helpful in guiding travel medicine practitioners than reports of absolute numbers, as the latter reflect travel preferences rather than the true risk. Although the majority of dengue infections in Swedish travellers were acquired in Thailand, the attack rates for dengue in travellers to Sri Lanka and Bangladesh were much higher. These data aid in refining information on the risk of dengue in travellers.
PubMed ID
24716463 View in PubMed
Less detail

Boys’ and Girls’ Relational and Physical Aggression in Nine Countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274314
Source
Aggress Behav. 2012 Jul-Aug;38(4):298-308
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jennifer E Lansford
Ann T Skinner
Emma Sorbring
Laura Di Giunta
Kirby Deater-Deckard
Kenneth A Dodge
Patrick S Malone
Paul Oburu
Concetta Pastorelli
Sombat Tapanya
Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado
Arnaldo Zelli
Suha M Al-Hassan
Liane Peña Alampay
Dario Bacchini
Anna Silvia Bombi
Marc H Bornstein
Lei Chang
Source
Aggress Behav. 2012 Jul-Aug;38(4):298-308
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression - psychology
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
China
Colombia
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Italy
Jordan
Kenya
Male
Peer Group
Philippines
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sweden
Thailand
United States
Abstract
Distinguishing between relational and physical aggression has become a key feature of many developmental studies in North America and Western Europe, but very little information is available on relational and physical aggression in more diverse cultural contexts. This study examined the factor structure of, associations between, and gender differences in relational and physical aggression in China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Children ages 7–10 years (N = 1,410) reported on their relationally and physically aggressive behavior. Relational and physical aggression shared a common factor structure across countries. In all nine countries, relational and physical aggression were significantly correlated (average r = .49). Countries differed in the mean levels of both relational and physical aggression that children reported using and with respect to whether children reported using more physical than relational aggression or more relational than physical aggression. Boys reported being more physically aggressive than girls across all nine countries; no consistent gender differences emerged in relational aggression. Despite mean-level differences in relational and physical aggression across countries, the findings provided support for cross-country similarities in associations between relational and physical aggression as well as links between gender and aggression.
Notes
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2002 Jan;128(1):3-7211843547
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2000 Jul;36(4):463-7210902698
Cites: Dev Psychol. 1997 Jul;33(4):601-99232375
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1998 Apr;66(2):337-479583337
Cites: Dev Psychol. 1998 Jul;34(4):687-979681260
Cites: Dev Psychol. 1998 Nov;34(6):1246-629823509
Cites: Shinrigaku Kenkyu. 2004 Aug;75(3):254-6115745072
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2005 Sep;131(5):763-8416187859
Cites: Dev Psychopathol. 2007 Winter;19(1):37-5517241483
Cites: Child Dev. 2007 Jul-Aug;78(4):1255-6417650137
Cites: Child Dev. 2008 Sep-Oct;79(5):1185-22918826521
Cites: Am Psychol. 2008 Oct;63(7):602-1418855491
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 2008 Nov;95(5):1005-1818954190
Cites: Aggress Behav. 2009 Sep-Oct;35(5):357-7519685551
Cites: J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2010 May;38(4):471-8420111898
Cites: Behav Brain Sci. 2010 Jun;33(2-3):61-83; discussion 83-13520550733
Cites: Science. 2011 May 27;332(6033):1100-421617077
Cites: Child Dev. 2002 Jul-Aug;73(4):1143-5012146739
Cites: Nebr Symp Motiv. 1998;45:75-14110752059
Cites: Child Dev. 1999 Sep-Oct;70(5):1181-9610546339
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2003 Mar;39(2):222-4512661883
Cites: Dev Psychol. 1997 Jul;33(4):579-889232373
PubMed ID
23935227 View in PubMed
Less detail

Broken dreams of a better life in Sweden: Thai women's lived experiences of intimate partner violence by Swedish men in international marriages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295674
Source
Glob Health Action. 2018; 11(1):1496889
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Weerati Pongthippat
Mehrdad Darvishpour
Jureerat Kijsomporn
Gunnel Östlund
Author Affiliation
a School of Health, Care and Social Welfare , Mälardalen University , Eskilstuna , Sweden.
Source
Glob Health Action. 2018; 11(1):1496889
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Intimate Partner Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Marriage - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Sex Offenses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Thailand
Abstract
Intimate partner violence by men against women has detrimental effects on equality, health and integration. Migrated and 'imported' wives experience an increased risk of intimate partner violence.
The purpose of this study was to explore Thai immigrant women's lived experiences of intimate partner violence in Sweden.
Semi-structured interviews based on the critical incident technique with specific questions about experiences of male-to-female intimate partner violence were used to collect data. The participants were Thai immigrant women who had lived in Sweden for more than five years. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify patterns and variations in the transcribed data material.
Eighteen interviewees reported psychological, physical, economic and/or sexual violence in their international marriages. These Thai women described being faithful and silent and reliable housewives. However, this did not keep them from being replaced and losing dignity as a result of intimate partner violence, including experiencing broken dreams and deception. Although their dreams were broken, they did not give up their efforts to achieve better lives in Sweden.
The vulnerability of imported wives in international marriages needs to be further recognised by health and welfare agencies in Sweden, as elsewhere, to ensure that these women have equal access to human rights, welfare and health as other citizens. From a health promotion perspective, home-based health check-ups are needed to stop the exploitation of imported wives. In Thailand, information and education about the unrecognised negative conditions of the Mia farang role (Imported wife role) need to be disseminated.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Apr 20;359(9315):1423-9 PMID 11978358
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2002 Nov;23(4):260-8 PMID 12406480
Cites: Violence Against Women. 2006 Jul;12(7):641-62 PMID 16777950
Cites: Br Med Bull. 2004;69:129-41 PMID 15226202
Cites: J Immigr Minor Health. 2011 Aug;13(4):647-58 PMID 20882346
Cites: J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2012 Sep;21(9):942-9 PMID 22747330
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Apr 5;371(9619):1165-72 PMID 18395577
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Sep 17;12:800 PMID 22984840
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Oct 5;360(9339):1083-8 PMID 12384003
Cites: J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2009 Jun;30(2):115-21 PMID 19533491
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2002 Nov;55(9):1603-17 PMID 12297246
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1954 Jul;51(4):327-58 PMID 13177800
Cites: Nurs Res. 1982 May-Jun;31(3):178-81 PMID 6918925
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2016 Jan 26;16:19 PMID 26813894
Cites: Violence Against Women. 2015 Dec;21(12):1431-55 PMID 26215287
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-12 PMID 14769454
Cites: J Interpers Violence. 2006 Feb;21(2):163-77 PMID 16368759
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2017;10(1):1396881 PMID 29119873
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2014 Sep 16;7:24991 PMID 25231099
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Oct 7;368(9543):1260-9 PMID 17027732
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2007 Jul;97(7):1319-25 PMID 17538065
Cites: Indian J Med Sci. 2005 May;59(5):195-9 PMID 15985727
Cites: J Transcult Nurs. 2000 Oct;11(4):274-80 PMID 11982036
PubMed ID
30073910 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Canadian Neurological Scale and the NIHSS: development and validation of a simple conversion model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143286
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2010;30(2):120-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Yongchai Nilanont
Chulaluk Komoltri
Gustavo Saposnik
Robert Côté
Silvia Di Legge
Yaping Jin
Naraporn Prayoonwiwat
Niphon Poungvarin
Vladimir Hachinski
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. siysl@mahidol.ac.th
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2010;30(2):120-6
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Observer Variation
Ontario
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Thailand
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The Canadian Neurological Scale (CNS) and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) are among the most reliable stroke severity assessment scales. The CNS requires less extensive neurological evaluation and is quicker and simpler to administer.
Our aim was to develop and validate a simple conversion model from the CNS to the NIHSS.
A conversion model was developed using data from a consecutive series of acute-stroke patients who were scored using both scales. The model was then validated in an external dataset in which all patients were prospectively assessed for stroke severity using both scales by different observers which consisted of neurology residents or stroke fellows.
In all, 168 patients were included in the model development, with a median age of 73 years (20-94). Men constituted 51.8%. The median NIHSS score was 6 (0-31). The median CNS score was 8.5 (1.5-11.5). The relationship between CNS and NIHSS could be expressed as the formula: NIHSS = 23 - 2 x CNS. A cohort of 350 acute-stroke patients with similar characteristics was used for model validation. There was a highly significant positive correlation between the observed and predicted NIHSS score (r = 0.87, p
PubMed ID
20501997 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cefotaxime-resistant Salmonella enterica in travelers returning from Thailand to Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261089
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Jul;20(7):1214-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Marianne Gunell
Laura Aulu
Jari Jalava
Susanna Lukinmaa-Åberg
Monica Osterblad
Jukka Ollgren
Pentti Huovinen
Anja Siitonen
Antti J Hakanen
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Jul;20(7):1214-7
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cefotaxime - therapeutic use
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Finland
Humans
Salmonella Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Salmonella enterica - drug effects - isolation & purification
Thailand
Travel
Abstract
During 1993-2011, cefotaxime resistance among Salmonella enterica isolates from patients in Finland increased substantially. Most of these infections originated in Thailand; many were qnr positive and belonged to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica monophasic serovar 4,[5],12:i:-. Although cefotaxime-resistant salmonellae mainly originate in discrete geographic areas, they represent a global threat.
Notes
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2001 Nov-Dec;7(6):996-100311747728
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2002 Jun;40(6):2153-6212037080
Cites: Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2006 Spring;3(1):97-10516602985
Cites: Microbes Infect. 2006 Jun;8(7):1945-5416714134
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2007;39(5):417-2417464864
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2008 Mar;8(3):159-6618291338
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2009 Mar;53(3):977-8619075050
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2009 May;15(5):809-1219402977
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2009 Aug;64(2):301-919474065
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2009 Sep;53(9):3832-619596880
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2009 Nov;47(11):3546-5619741087
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 2010 Apr;42(4):275-8020121649
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2011 Jan;17(1):97-921192864
PubMed ID
24960266 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child care and child development in Thailand, Sweden, and Israel--their relevance for the United States

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43315
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1973 May;63(5):396-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1973
  1 website  
Author
Siegel, E
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1973 May;63(5):396-400
Date
May-1973
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child care
Child Day Care Centers - manpower
Child Development
Child Health Services
Child Nutrition
Child Rearing
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Israel
Nurseries
Parent-Child Relations
Sweden
Thailand
United States
Abstract
This report encompasses material gathered in 1971 in Thailand, Sweden, and Israel. Observations of group care arrangements for young children, discussions with local program and research workers as well as review of relevant publications form the basis of the presentation. A substantial portion of five months in Israel was available for study of the kibbutz and its relationship to child care and development, while during shorter stays in Thailand and Sweden, child care arrangements were a focus of interest. The extensive experiences of the kibbutz and Swedish day nurseries will be emphasized since they are more applicable to present concerns in the United States.
PubMed ID
4700651 View in PubMed
Online Resources
Less detail

Chromogranin A cell density in the large intestine of Asian and European patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285964
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2017 Jun - Jul;52(6-7):691-697
Publication Type
Article
Author
Magdy El-Salhy
Tanisa Patcharatrakul
Jan Gunnar Hatlebakk
Trygve Hausken
Odd Helge Gilja
Sutep Gonlachanvit
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2017 Jun - Jul;52(6-7):691-697
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cell Count
Chromogranin A - metabolism
Colon - pathology
Colonoscopy
Enteroendocrine Cells - metabolism
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - ethnology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Rectum - pathology
Thailand
Abstract
Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in Asia show distinctive differences from those in the western world. The gastrointestinal endocrine cells appear to play an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS. The present study aimed at studying the density of chromogranin A (CgA) cells in the large intestine of Thai and Norwegian IBS patients.
Thirty Thai IBS patients and 20 control subjects, and 47 Norwegian IBS patients and 20 control subjects were included. A standard colonoscopy was performed in both the patients and controls, and biopsy samples were taken from the colon and the rectum. The biopsy samples were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and immunostained for CgA. The density of CgA cells was determined by computerized image analysis.
In the colon and rectum, the CgA cell densities were far higher in both IBS and healthy Thai subjects than in Norwegians. The colonic CgA cell density was lower in Norwegian IBS patients than in controls, but did not differ between Thai IBS patients and controls. In the rectum, the CgA cell densities in both Thai and Norwegian patients did not differ from those of controls.
The higher densities of CgA cells in Thai subjects than Norwegians may be explained by a higher exposure to infections at childhood and the development of a broad immune tolerance, by differences in the intestinal microbiota, and/or differing diet habits. The normal CgA cell density in Thai IBS patients in contrast to that of Norwegians may be due to differences in pathophysiology.
PubMed ID
28346031 View in PubMed
Less detail

87 records – page 1 of 9.