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Associations between plasma persistent organic pollutant levels and blood pressure in Inuit adults from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108571
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:282-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
  1 document  
Author
Beatriz Valera
Pierre Ayotte
Paul Poirier
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Axe santé publique et pratiques optimales en santé, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Canada. beatriz.valera@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:282-9
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
631157
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Arctic Regions
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Diet
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Female
Fishes
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Hypertension - chemically induced - epidemiology
Inuits
Lindane - blood
Male
Mercury - blood
Middle Aged
Pesticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Quebec - epidemiology
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) increases the risk of hypertension in environmentally exposed populations. High POP levels have been detected in Arctic populations and the exposure is related to high consumption of fish and marine mammals, which represent the traditional diet of these populations.
We examined the associations between polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) pesticides and hypertension among Inuit from Nunavik (Quebec, Canada).
A complete set of data was obtained for 315 Inuit=18years who participated in the "Santé Québec" health survey that was conducted in the 14 villages of Nunavik in 1992. Fourteen polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 8 OC pesticides or their metabolites were measured in plasma samples using gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Blood pressure (BP) was measured using a standardized protocol and information regarding anti-hypertensive medication was obtained through questionnaires. The associations between log-transformed POPs and hypertension (systolic BP=140mmHg, diastolic BP=90mmHg or anti-hypertensive medication) were analyzed using multiple logistic regressions.
Total PCBs as well as the sum of non-dioxin-like PCBs were significantly associated with higher risk of hypertension. Furthermore, the risk of hypertension increased with higher plasma concentrations of congeners 101, 105, 138 and 187. Models adjusted for BP risk factors became significant after including n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and further adjustment for lead and mercury did not change the results. Regarding OC pesticides, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) was associated with increased risk of hypertension while inverse associations were observed with p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), ß-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and oxychlordane.
Some PCB congeners were associated with higher risk of hypertension in this highly exposed population. Most associations became significant after including n-3 PUFAs in the models. However, the analyses of OC pesticides revealed divergent results, which need to be confirmed in further cohort and experimental studies.
PubMed ID
23872387 View in PubMed
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Associations of persistent organic pollutants with abdominal obesity in the elderly: The Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132263
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Apr;40:170-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Duk-Hee Lee
Lars Lind
David R Jacobs
Samira Salihovic
Bert van Bavel
P Monica Lind
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventative Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Jung-gu, Daegu, Republic of Korea. lee_dh@knu.ac.kr
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Apr;40:170-8
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes mellitus
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - blood
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Male
Obesity, Abdominal - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pesticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Abstract
In animal experiments, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have induced visceral obesity. To address this possibility in humans, we evaluated associations between POPs and abdominal obesity both cross-sectionally and prospectively.
Twenty-one plasma POPs (16 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, 3 organochlorine (OC) pesticides, 1 brominated diphenyl ether (BDE), and 1 dioxin) were measured at baseline in 970 participants aged 70 years of the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS), with prospective analyses in 511 participants re-examined after 5 years. Abdominal obesity was defined by an increased waist circumference.
In the cross-sectional analyses, concentrations of the less chlorinated PCBs, OC pesticides such as p,p'-DDE and dioxin had adjusted odds ratios of 2 to 3 for abdominal obesity. Many relations had inverted U-shapes rather than being linear, particularly in women. In contrast, concentrations of highly chlorinated PCBs were strongly inversely associated with abdominal obesity. In a single model including summary measures of the less chlorinated PCBs, highly chlorinated PCBs, and OC pesticides, both the positive associations and inverse associations strengthened. Similar but somewhat weaker associations were seen between POPs and risk of development of abdominal obesity in the prospective analyses.
Using both a cross-sectional and a prospective design, low-dose exposure to less chlorinated PCBs, p,p'-DDE, and dioxin, were associated with existence or development of abdominal obesity, while highly chlorinated PCBs had an opposite association in an elderly population, despite the previous observation of higher incident diabetes associated with these same PCBs.
PubMed ID
21835469 View in PubMed
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Circulating levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) among elderly men and women from Sweden: results from the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126747
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Sep;44:59-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Samira Salihovic
Erik Lampa
Gunilla Lindström
Lars Lind
P Monica Lind
Bert van Bavel
Author Affiliation
MTM Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. samira.salihovic@oru.se
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Sep;44:59-67
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Hexachlorobenzene
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Male
Pesticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Sex Factors
Sweden
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Abstract
Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are a huge group of chemicals that have been linked to various adverse health effects in humans. Large epidemiological studies investigating gender differences in levels of POPs in the elderly are limited and the results from these are not always consistent. The present study was undertaken to examine the background levels of a broad range of POPs in human plasma samples among elderly men and women from Sweden and to assess the influence of gender. Levels of 23 POPs were determined in plasma samples collected during 2001-2004 from 1016 (50.2% women) 70year-old participants from the population-based Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS). Measurements were performed using high resolution gas chromatography with high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC-HRMS) and the POPs studied were 16 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), five organochlorine (OC) pesticides, one dioxin, and one brominated flame retardant. The concentrations of the selected POPs were found similar, or comparable, to other studies of non-occupationally exposed populations from Sweden and Europe. Differences in levels of POPs between men and women were assessed by using Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test. Significant (p
PubMed ID
22361238 View in PubMed
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Dietary exposure to dioxins and PCBs in a large cohort of pregnant women: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108262
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:398-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Ida H Caspersen
Helle K Knutsen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Helen E Kvalem
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ida.henriette.caspersen@fhi.no
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:398-407
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Burden
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Dioxins - administration & dosage - blood
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - administration & dosage - analysis - blood
Female
Fish Products - adverse effects - analysis
Food Contamination
Humans
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - blood
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Exposure to dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during pregnancy and breastfeeding may result in adverse health effects in children. Prenatal exposure is determined by the concentrations of dioxins and PCBs in maternal blood, which reflect the body burden obtained by long term dietary exposure. The aims of this study were (1) to describe dietary exposure and important dietary sources to dioxins and PCBs in a large group of pregnant women and (2) to identify maternal characteristics associated with high dietary exposure to dioxins and PCBs. Dietary exposure to dioxins (sum of toxic equivalents (TEQs) from dioxin-like (dl) compounds) and PCB-153 in 83,524 pregnant women (gestational weeks 17-22) who participated in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) during the years 2002-2009 was calculated based on a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and a database of dioxin and PCB concentrations in Norwegian food. The median (interquartile range, IQR) intake of PCB-153 (marker of ndl-PCBs) was 0.81 (0.77) ng/kg bw/day. For dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs, the median (IQR) intake was 0.56 (0.37) pg TEQ/kg bw/day. Moreover, 2.3% of the participants had intakes exceeding the tolerable weekly intake (TWI) of 14pg TEQ/kg bw/week. Multiple regression analysis showed that dietary exposure was positively associated with maternal age, maternal education, weight gain during pregnancy, being a student, and alcohol consumption during pregnancy and negatively associated with pre-pregnancy BMI and smoking. A high dietary exposure to PCB-153 or dl-compounds (TEQ) was mainly explained by the consumption of seagull eggs and/or pate with fish liver and roe. Women who according to Norwegian recommendations avoid these food items generally do not have dietary exposure above the tolerable intake of dioxins and dl-PCBs.
PubMed ID
23911340 View in PubMed
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Direct assessment of cumulative aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist activity in sera from experimentally exposed mice and environmentally exposed humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143850
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 May;118(5):693-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Jennifer J Schlezinger
Pamela L Bernard
Amelia Haas
Philippe Grandjean
Pal Weihe
David H Sherr
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02118 , USA. jschlezi@bu.edu
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 May;118(5):693-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cell Line
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Female
Humans
Ligands
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Pregnancy
Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon - agonists - blood
Risk assessment
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood - toxicity
Abstract
Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands adversely affect many biological processes. However, assessment of the significance of human exposures is hampered by an incomplete understanding of how complex mixtures affect AhR activation/inactivation.
These studies used biological readouts to provide a broader context for estimating human risk than that obtained with serum extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS)-based assays alone.
AhR agonist activity was quantified in sera from dioxin-treated mice, commercial human sources, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-exposed Faroe Islanders using an AhR-driven reporter cell line. To validate relationships between serum AhR agonist levels and biological outcomes, AhR agonist activity in mouse sera correlated with toxic end points. AhR agonist activity in unmanipulated ("neat") human sera was compared with these biologically relevant doses and with GC/MS-assayed PCB levels.
Mouse serum AhR agonist activity correlated with injected dioxin dose, thymic atrophy, and heptomegaly, validating the use of neat serum to assess AhR agonist activity. AhR agonist activity in sera from Faroe Islanders varied widely, was associated with the frequency of recent pilot whale dinners, but did not correlate with levels of PCBs quantified by GC/MS. Surprisingly, significant "baseline" AhR activity was found in commercial human sera.
An AhR reporter assay revealed cumulative levels of AhR activation potential in neat serum, whereas extraction may preclude detection of important non-dioxin-like biological activity. Significant levels of AhR agonist activity in commercial sera and in Faroe Islander sera, compared with that from experimentally exposed mice, suggest human exposures that are biologically relevant in both populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20435556 View in PubMed
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Maternal concentrations of persistent organochlorine pollutants and the risk of asthma in offspring: results from a prospective cohort with 20 years of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106479
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Jan;122(1):93-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Susanne Hansen
Marin Strøm
Sjurdur F Olsen
Ekaterina Maslova
Panu Rantakokko
Hannu Kiviranta
Dorte Rytter
Bodil H Bech
Linda V Hansen
Thorhallur I Halldorsson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Fetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Jan;122(1):93-9
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Female
Hexachlorobenzene - blood
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Infant, Newborn
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous findings suggest that developmental exposures to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) may be detrimental for the development of the immune system in the offspring. Whether these suspected immunoregulatory effects persist beyond early childhood remains unclear.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between maternal serum concentrations of POPs and the risk of asthma in offspring after 20 years of follow-up.
A birth cohort with 965 women was formed in 1988-1989 in Aarhus, Denmark. Concentrations of six polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (congeners 118, 138, 153, 156, 170, 180), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p´-DDE) were quantified in maternal serum (n=872) collected in gestation week 30. Information about offspring use of asthma medications was obtained from the Danish Registry of Medicinal Product Statistics.
Maternal serum concentrations of HCB and dioxin-like PCB-118 were positively associated with offspring asthma medication use after 20 years of follow-up (p for trend
Notes
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PubMed ID
24162035 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.