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The 5alpha-reductase type II A49T and V89L high-activity allelic variants are more common in men with prostate cancer compared with the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173682
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Oct;48(4):679-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Yvonne L Giwercman
Per-Anders Abrahamsson
Aleksander Giwercman
Virgil Gadaleanu
Göran Ahlgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Wallenberg Laboratory, entrance 46, SE - 205 02 Malmö, Sweden. yvonne.giwercman@kir.mas.lu.se
Source
Eur Urol. 2005 Oct;48(4):679-85
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3-Oxo-5-alpha-Steroid 4-Dehydrogenase - blood - genetics
Aged
Alanine
Alleles
Arginine
Case-Control Studies
Dihydrotestosterone - blood
Disease Progression
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutamine
Humans
Leucine
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prostatic Hyperplasia - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Receptors, Androgen - blood - genetics
Risk factors
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminal Repeat Sequences
Testosterone - blood
Threonine
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Valine
Abstract
To compare men with prostate disease with those from the general population regarding polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene and in the 5alpha-reductase II (SRD5A2) gene.
The SRD5A2 polymorphisms A49T, V89L and R227Q, the androgen receptor CAG and GGN repeats and sex hormone status was investigated in men with prostate cancer (CaP) (n=89), benign prostate hyperplasia (n=45) and healthy military conscripts (n=223).
The SRD5A2 high-activity allele variants A49T AT and V89L LL were more frequent in CaP-patients compared to general population, p=0.026 and p=0.05, respectively. CaP progression was, however, independent of SRD5A2 variants. In contrary, men with GGN
PubMed ID
16039774 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 5-year follow-up study of disease incidence in men with an abnormal hormone pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47352
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Oct;254(4):386-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
R. Rosmond
S. Wallerius
P. Wanger
L. Martin
G. Holm
P. Björntorp
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Institute, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Oct;254(4):386-90
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Cerebrovascular Accident - epidemiology - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - metabolism
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose - analysis
Humans
Hydrocortisone - analysis
Hypertension - epidemiology - metabolism
Incidence
Insulin - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have suggested that abnormal levels of cortisol and testosterone might increase the risk of serious somatic diseases. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a 5-year follow-up study in middle-aged men. METHODS: A population-based cohort study conducted in 1995 amongst 141 Swedish men born in 1944, in whom a clinical examination supplemented by medical history aimed to disclose the presence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, stroke), type 2 diabetes and hypertension were performed at baseline and at follow-up in the year 2000. In addition, salivary cortisol levels were measured repeatedly over the day. Serum testosterone concentrations were also determined. Using the baseline data, an algorithm was constructed, which classified the secretion pattern of cortisol and testosterone from each individual as being normal or abnormal. RESULTS: By the end of follow-up, men with an abnormal hormone secretion pattern (n = 73) had elevated mean arterial pressure (P = 0.003), fasting insulin (P = 0.009) and insulin : glucose ratio (P = 0.005) compared with men with a normal secretion pattern (n = 68). Body mass index, waist circumference, and waist : hip ratio were significantly elevated in both groups. However, the 5-year incidence of CVD, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension were significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
12974877 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic performance of opposite-sex and same-sex twins in adolescence: A Danish national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265765
Source
Horm Behav. 2015 Mar;69:123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Linda Ahrenfeldt
Inge Petersen
Wendy Johnson
Kaare Christensen
Source
Horm Behav. 2015 Mar;69:123-31
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Androgens - blood
Cognition - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Measurement - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Perception - physiology
Psychology, Adolescent
Sex Characteristics
Testosterone - blood
Twins - psychology
Twins, Dizygotic - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Testosterone is an important hormone in the sexual differentiation of the brain, contributing to differences in cognitive abilities between males and females. For instance, studies in clinical populations such as females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) who are exposed to high levels of androgens in utero support arguments for prenatal testosterone effects on characteristics such as visuospatial cognition and behaviour. The comparison of opposite-sex (OS) and same-sex (SS) twin pairs can be used to help establish the role of prenatal testosterone. However, although some twin studies confirm a masculinizing effect of a male co-twin regarding for instance perception and cognition it remains unclear whether intra-uterine hormone transfer exists in humans. Our aim was to test the potential influences of testosterone on academic performance in OS twins. We compared ninth-grade test scores and teacher ratings of OS (n=1812) and SS (n=4054) twins as well as of twins and singletons (n=13,900) in mathematics, physics/chemistry, Danish, and English. We found that males had significantly higher test scores in mathematics than females (.06-.15 SD), whereas females performed better in Danish (.33-.49 SD), English (.20 SD), and neatness (.45-.64 SD). However, we did not find that OS females performed better in mathematics than SS and singleton females, nor did they perform worse either in Danish or English. Scores for OS and SS males were similar in all topics. In conclusion, this study did not provide evidence for a masculinization of female twins with male co-twins with regard to academic performance in adolescence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25655669 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adiposity, compared with masculinity, serves as a more valid cue to immunocompetence in human mate choice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118562
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Jan 22;280(1751):20122495
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2013
Author
Markus J Rantala
Vinet Coetzee
Fhionna R Moore
Ilona Skrinda
Sanita Kecko
Tatjana Krama
Inese Kivleniece
Indrikis Krams
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Section of Ecology, University of Turku, 20014 Turku, Finland.
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Jan 22;280(1751):20122495
Date
Jan-22-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Adiposity - genetics
Adult
Body Weights and Measures
Choice Behavior
Cues
European Continental Ancestry Group
Face
Female
Finland
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood
Humans
Immunocompetence - genetics
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Latvia
Male
Masculinity
Regression Analysis
Sexual Behavior - physiology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
According to the 'good genes' hypothesis, females choose males based on traits that indicate the male's genetic quality in terms of disease resistance. The 'immunocompetence handicap hypothesis' proposed that secondary sexual traits serve as indicators of male genetic quality, because they indicate that males can contend with the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone. Masculinity is commonly assumed to serve as such a secondary sexual trait. Yet, women do not consistently prefer masculine looking men, nor is masculinity consistently related to health across studies. Here, we show that adiposity, but not masculinity, significantly mediates the relationship between a direct measure of immune response (hepatitis B antibody response) and attractiveness for both body and facial measurements. In addition, we show that circulating testosterone is more closely associated with adiposity than masculinity. These findings indicate that adiposity, compared with masculinity, serves as a more important cue to immunocompetence in female mate choice.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23193134 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambient temperature effects on photo induced gonadal cycles and hormonal secretion patterns in Great Tits from three different breeding latitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95553
Source
Horm Behav. 2008 Jun;54(1):60-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Silverin Bengt
Wingfield John
Stokkan Karl-Arne
Massa Renato
Järvinen Antero
Andersson Nils-Ake
Lambrechts Marcel
Sorace Alberto
Blomqvist Donald
Author Affiliation
Department of Zoology, University of Göteborg, Sweden. bengt.silverin@zool.gu.se
Source
Horm Behav. 2008 Jun;54(1):60-8
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Ecosystem
Geography
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood - secretion
Gonads - metabolism - physiology
Light
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Passeriformes - blood - metabolism - physiology
Photoperiod
Reproduction - physiology
Seasons
Temperature
Testis - anatomy & histology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
The present study determines how populations of Great Tits (Parus major) breeding in southern, mid and northern European latitudes have adjusted their reproductive endocrinology to differences in the ambient temperature during the gonadal cycle. A study based on long-term breeding data, using the Colwell predictability model, showed that the start of the breeding season has a high predictability ( approximately 0.8-0.9) at all latitudes, and that the environmental information factor (I(e)) progressively decreased from mid Italy (I(e)>4) to northern Finland (I(e)
PubMed ID
18402961 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of 508 infertile male patients in south-western Finland in 1980-2000: hormonal status and factors predisposing to immunological infertility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183006
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2003 Dec 10;111(2):173-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2003
Author
Esko Veräjänkorva
Matti Laato
Pasi Pöllänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy, Institute of Biomedicine and The Turku Graduate School of Clinical Sciences, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland. esolve@utu.fi
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2003 Dec 10;111(2):173-8
Date
Dec-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - complications
Autoantibodies - blood
Finland
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Hormones - blood
Humans
Hypogonadism - etiology
Infertility, Male - blood - immunology
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Mumps - complications
Risk factors
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - analysis
Smoking - adverse effects
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility
Spermatozoa - abnormalities - immunology
Testosterone - blood
Varicocele - complications - therapy
Abstract
To analyse the factors predisposing to male immunological infertility from the hospital records of 508 patients that had been treated for infertility in the Turku University Central Hospital from 1980 to 2000. In addition, the hormonal status was investigated at the beginning of treatment.
Patients with a history of mumps, or either a fresh varicocele or a history of varicocele had statistically significant lower levels of MAR antisperm antibodies (ASAs) than patients with no such conditions. Repair of varicocele (either surgical or embolisation), showed a statistically significant enhancement of the total sperm cell counts in ejaculates, but it appeared not to have any influence on other parameters of the semen analysis (mobility and morphology). Of all male infertility patients, 66.3% had normal hormonal status at the beginning of treatment, 12.6% of patients had hypotestosteronemia and 22.1% had subclinical hypogonadism. Patients with subclinical hypogonadism had lower total sperm cell count in ejaculates than patients with normal hormonal status although they had statistically significant more offspring. In addition, it appeared that mumps orchitis as well as smoking and alcohol abuse are risk factors for subclinical hypogonadism.
No clear predisposing factor for male immunological infertility could be found. However, patients with subclinical hypogonadism differed from other male infertility patients and thus may form a special group among the male infertility patients.
PubMed ID
14597247 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of prognostic factors in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Uro-Oncology Group of Northern Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24782
Source
J Urol. 1991 Aug;146(2):372-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
D S Ernst
J. Hanson
P M Venner
Author Affiliation
Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Urol. 1991 Aug;146(2):372-6
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - blood - mortality - therapy
Age Factors
Alberta
Bone Neoplasms - blood - mortality - secondary - therapy
Bone and Bones - radionuclide imaging
Combined Modality Therapy
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - blood - mortality - secondary - therapy
Male
Neoplasm Staging
Orchiectomy
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - mortality - therapy
Survival Analysis
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
We determined the influence of the extent of disease on bone scan, serum testosterone, patient age, performance status, method of initial diagnosis, Gleason grade, clinical stage at diagnosis, serum acid phosphatase, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) and primary hormonal treatment on survival. The clinical and hormonal data were obtained when the presence of metastatic disease was established and treatment was to be initiated in 162 men with metastatic prostate cancer. Mean followup was 16 months (range 1 to 105 months). A total of 70 men (43.2%) died of the metastatic disease during the evaluation period. Log rank analysis revealed that only serum testosterone (p = 0.035) and extent of disease on bone scan (p = 0.003) significantly affected over-all survival. A trend (p = 0.068) towards decreased survival was observed with increasing values of PSA. Increasing values of acid phosphatase positively correlated with extent of disease on bone scan but was not a significant independent prognostic factor. Patient age, performance status, clinical stage, method of initial diagnosis, Gleason grade and type of hormonal treatment did not significantly influence survival. Upon using multivariate Cox analysis, only extent of disease on bone scan was significantly correlated with over-all survival (p less than 0.014). PSA may also be influential but longer duration of followup will be necessary. We conclude that extent of disease on bone scan is the most important prognosticator of the analyzed factors and that serum testosterone may be of value.
PubMed ID
1856934 View in PubMed
Less detail

An anthropological perspective on the evolution and lateralization of the brain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60775
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1977 Sep 30;299:424-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1977
Author
J L Dawson
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1977 Sep 30;299:424-47
Date
Sep-30-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Anthropology, Cultural
Anthropology, Physical
Brain - physiology
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
Estrogens - blood
Evolution
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Laterality - physiology
Male
Perception - physiology
Phenotype
Rats
Speech - physiology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to review the anthropological evidence relating to the cultural determinants of the right-hand first postaulted by Hertz in his classic study. Also a genetic/cultural conformity model of handedness is presented that postulates that the incidence of handedness in a society is held to result both from the genetic expression of handedness interacting with cultural pressures towards conformity. The evolutionary basis for the hemispheric functional organization into cognitive and perceptual hemispheric functions is discussed in terms of "right-handed dominant homozygotes, DD," "heterozygotes, DR," mixed-handers, and "left-handed recessive homozygotes, RR." The cross-cultural distribution of handedness provides support for this model since the more conforming agriculturalists as measured by the Asch Test have a significantly lower incidence of left-handedness (0.59%, 1.5% and 3.4%), while the more permissively socialized Eskimo and Arunta hunters, who are seen to be more independent on the Asch Test, have 11.3% and 10.5% left-handers, respectively. Also, due to the greater pressures for females to conform in agricultural societies, the incidence of female left-handedness in agricultural societies is 0% out of 330 female Ss, with 3.8%, 0.79%, and 2.5% in agricultural males, as contrasted with the Eskimo hunters who have 12.5% left-handed males and 10.3% left-handed females, showing no significant sex difference. A further Hong Kong-English study also supports the genetic/cultural conformity model with a significantly lower incidence of Hong Kong Chinese left-handers (RR: male = 2.7%, and female = 4.2%). The next section, concerned with the neonatal sex-hormone differentiation and lateralization processes, provides a neuropsychologic theory relating to spatial and linguistic skills that is relevant to the following section, which deals with relationships between laterality and cognitive style. The results are also presented for the Alaskan Eskimo in relation to hand, eye, auditory dominance and cognitive style. The analysis of Eskimo fixed-versus mixed-laterality data also confirms, as predicted, that both within and across a modality (e.g., right hand/right eye/right ear) fixed right-dominance Eskimo Ss are more field-independent than mixed-dominance Ss, while the fixed left-dominance Ss are the most field-dependent and have lower spatial skills. The discussion section reviews the papers relating to the genetic/conformity model of handedness, as well as laterality and cognitive style. The evolutionary adaptive significance of sex differences in gonadal differentiation and lateralization of the brain on spatial and linguistic skills are also reviewed. The conclusions are concerned with the implications for biosocial theory and the rapidly changing incidence of left-handedness due to accompanying changes in cultural pressures both within and across cultures.
PubMed ID
280219 View in PubMed
Less detail

Androgenicity in relation to body fat distribution and metabolism in 38-year-old women--the European Fat Distribution Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103626
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1990;43(1):21-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
J C Seidell
M. Cigolini
J. Charzewska
B M Ellsinger
G. Di Biase
P. Björntorp
J G Hautvast
F. Contaldo
V. Szostak
L A Scuro
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Agricultural University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1990;43(1):21-34
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adult
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Body constitution
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Italy
Lipids - blood
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Netherlands
Poland
Sweden
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
We studied fat distribution and metabolic risk factors in 434 38-year old women selected from population registrars in 5 cities in different parts of Europe. In the present study we focussed on the geographical variation in serum concentrations of free testosterone and its relation to measures of obesity, fat distribution and indicators of cardiovascular risk (serum lipids, insulin, and blood pressure). There were significant differences in free testosterone levels (F = 5.4, p less than 0.001) with lowest levels in Polish women (mean +/- SEM: 1.56 +/- 0.08 pg/ml) and highest in women from Italy (2.07 +/- 0.12 pg/ml). In the pooled data, free testosterone levels were correlated with several anthropometric variables (strongest with subscapular/triceps ratio r = 0.27, with subscapular skinfold and waist/thigh circumference ratio r = 0.25 p-values less than 0.001). In addition, free testosterone was positively correlated with serum total cholesterol (r = 0.11), HDL/total cholesterol fraction (r = 0.12), serum insulin (r = 0.20) and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.15). These associations remained significant after adjustment for body mass index and waist/thigh ratio (not for diastolic blood pressure) but were no longer significant after further adjustment for insulin levels. There were considerable differences in strength of the associations mentioned between the 5 centers. We conclude that degree of obesity, fat distribution and serum levels of free testosterone all, to a limited degree, contribute to the metabolic profile of randomly selected 38-year old women but that adjustment for such variables increases the differences in metabolic profiles between women from different centers of Europe.
PubMed ID
2181077 View in PubMed
Less detail

Androgen levels are associated with blood pressure in pregnant women after term.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131150
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Feb;91(2):232-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Sven M Carlsen
Runa Heimstad
Author Affiliation
Departments of Endocrinology, Institute of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Trondheim, Norway. sven.carlsen@ntnu.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Feb;91(2):232-6
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-alpha-Hydroxyprogesterone - blood
Adult
Age Factors
Androgens - blood
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estrogens - blood
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Insulin - blood
Linear Models
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Prolonged - blood - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
To assess possible associations between androgen, estrogen and insulin levels and blood pressure in pregnant women after term, compared with the effect of other well-known factors.
Cross-sectional retrospective study.
University Hospital, Trondheim region.
Four hundred and eighty-nine post-term women with uncomplicated pregnancies.
Blood pressure measurements and fasting serum samples drawn one week beyond the estimated day of delivery (defined as 41(+2) weeks).
Blood pressure, maternal age, body mass index, parity, smoking habits and serum levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstendione, free testosterone index, estradiol, estriol, progesterone, 17-hydroxy-progesterone and insulin.
In univariate linear regression analyses, body mass index, androstendione, free testosterone index and insulin were positively associated and parity was negatively associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. In multivariate linear regression analyses, systolic blood pressure was positively associated with body mass index and free testosterone index, but negatively associated with parity and 17-hydroxy-progesterone levels, while diastolic blood pressure was positively associated with age and free testosterone index, but negatively associated with parity and 17-hydroxy-progesterone levels.
Testosterone may increase blood pressure in pregnant women, while 17-hydroxy-progesterone may have the opposite effect.
PubMed ID
21933155 View in PubMed
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