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Age at puberty and risk of testicular germ cell cancer (Ontario, Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204960
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1998 May;9(3):253-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
H K Weir
N. Kreiger
L D Marrett
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1998 May;9(3):253-8
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Case-Control Studies
Germinoma - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Puberty - physiology
Risk factors
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Incidence rates of testicular cancer are increasing among postpubescent men. This suggests that putative exposures may operate early in life and have changed over time. The age at which endocrine activity accelerates (age at puberty) may be such an exposure. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between age at puberty and testicular cancer risk.
A population-based case-control study was conducted in the province of Ontario, Canada which included males, aged 16 to 59 years, diagnosed with testicular germ cell cancer between 1987 and 1989, and age-matched controls. Data were collected on 502 cases, 346 case mothers, 975 controls, and 522 control mothers. Surrogate measures for age at puberty included age at starting to shave, appearance of hair, growth spurt, and voice change.
A protective effect of later puberty was evident for all four measures of puberty as reported by both subjects and mothers, and greater protection was conferred when the greatest number of later puberty events were reported. Risk associated with earlier puberty was inconclusive.
As age at puberty is decreasing in the population, the proportion of boys experiencing the protective effect of later puberty may be diminishing. This may help explain the increasing incidence of testicular cancer.
PubMed ID
9684705 View in PubMed
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Birth cohort effects underlying the increasing testicular cancer incidence in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201561
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):176-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Liu
S W Wen
Y. Mao
L. Mery
J. Rouleau
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Reproductive and Child Health, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, ON. shiliang_liu@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):176-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To examine the pattern of testicular cancer incidence by age, time period and birth cohort since 1969 in Canada.
In addition to analyses of the secular trends by age group and birth cohort separately, an age-period-cohort model and the submodels with standard Poisson assumptions were fitted to the data.
The overall age-adjusted incidence of testicular cancer increased in Canada, from 2.8 per 100,000 males in 1969-71 to 4.2 in 1991-93. The younger age groups showed much higher absolute incidence rates in the recent period compared with those in the early period. Age-period-cohort modelling of data restricted to males aged 20-84 years suggested that the observed increase in testicular cancer could be largely attributed to a birth cohort effect. A steady increase in risk was observed among men born since 1945; those born between 1959 and 1968 were 2.0 (95% CI, 1.5-2.6) times as likely to develop testicular cancer as those born between 1904 and 1913.
The risk of testicular cancer has increased over time and changing exposure to environmental factors early in life may be responsible for this.
PubMed ID
10401168 View in PubMed
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Birth order and risk of testicular cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24450
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 May;3(3):265-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
A. Prener
C C Hsieh
G. Engholm
D. Trichopoulos
O M Jensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Copenhagen.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 May;3(3):265-72
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Order
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Family Characteristics
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Medical Records - standards
Nurse Midwives
Registries
Risk factors
School Health Services
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Abstract
To explore the etiology of testicular cancer, cases of testicular cancer were identified among members of a cohort of Danish boys born between 1941 and 1957 (inclusive), who had attended schools in Copenhagen and Gentofte and whose school health records were contained in an archive under the supervision of the Danish Cancer Registry. One hundred and eighty-three cases of testicular cancer diagnosed before 31 December 1984 were identified; 366 controls, matched to cases by sex and age, were selected from the same cohort. Information on potential risk factors and confounders was obtained from two sources: school health records and midwife protocols, both of which were recorded prior to the diagnosis of testicular cancer in cases. Relative risks (RR) approximated by the odds ratios were calculated and, in logistic regression analyses, adjustments were done for known or suspected confounders. A decreasing risk of testicular cancer with increasing birth order was observed (P = 0.020). Compared with being firstborn, being number four or more in birth order was associated with a significantly decreased RR for all testicular cancers (RR = 0.3, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 0.3-0.8) and testicular seminoma (RR = 0.1, CI = 0.02-0.9). No association was observed between high social class and the risk of testicular cancer (RR = 1.4, CI = 0.8-2.3); neither was age at which the study subjects had mumps or measles related to risk of testicular cancer. No cases of mumps orchitis were observed before or during school years. A slightly increased RR for testicular cancer among boys from small families could be explained by the association between family size and birth order.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1610973 View in PubMed
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Birth weight, adult height, and testicular cancer: cohort study of 337,249 Swedish young men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18223
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Aug;14(6):595-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Finn Rasmussen
David Gunnell
Anders Ekbom
Johan Hallqvist
Per Tynelius
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden. finn.rasmussen@phs.ki.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Aug;14(6):595-8
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body Height
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seminoma - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: A positive association has been reported between adult height and the incidence of testicular cancer. No previous study has explored whether this relationship is due to the influence of fetal growth on adult height. METHODS: This research question was studied in a Swedish national cohort comprising 337,249 males born 1973-1980 and followed-up for a mean of 4.8 years after army medical conscription examination. Cases of testicular cancer were ascertained from the Swedish National Cancer Register. 144 cases of testicular cancer (120 non-seminomas) diagnosed after conscription were identified. RESULTS: Positive associations were found between height at age 18 years and the incidence of testicular cancer. No associations were observed between gestational age adjusted birthweight and cancer incidence. The positive association between height and cancer incidence was not attenuated in models controlling for birth weight. CONCLUSIONS: Factors influencing post-natal growth such as diet or growth related genes might underlie the association between height and cancer.
PubMed ID
12948291 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among firefighters: 45 years of follow-up in five Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105024
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71(6):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Eero Pukkala
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Elisabete Weiderpass
Kristina Kjaerheim
Elsebeth Lynge
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Pär Sparén
Paul A Demers
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71(6):398-404
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Carcinogens
Cohort Studies
Firefighters
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Risk
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Firefighters are potentially exposed to a wide range of known and suspected carcinogens through their work. The objectives of this study were to examine the patterns of cancer among Nordic firefighters, and to compare them with the results from previous studies.
Data for this study were drawn from a linkage between the census data for 15 million people from the five Nordic countries and their cancer registries for the period 1961-2005. SIR analyses were conducted with the cancer incidence rates for the entire national study populations used as reference rates.
A total of 16 422 male firefighters were included in the final cohort. A moderate excess risk was seen for all cancer sites combined, (SIR=1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.11). There were statistically significant excesses in the age category of 30-49 years in prostate cancer (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.34 to 4.52) and skin melanoma (SIR=1.62, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.23), while there was almost no excess in the older ages. By contrast, an increased risk, mainly in ages of 70 years and higher, was observed for non-melanoma skin cancer (SIR=1.40, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.76), multiple myeloma (SIR=1.69, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.51), adenocarcinoma of the lung (SIR=1.90, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.62), and mesothelioma (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.24 to 4.77). By contrast with earlier studies, the incidence of testicular cancer was decreased (SIR=0.51, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.98).
Some of these associations have been observed previously, and potential exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos and shift work involving disruption of circadian rhythms may partly explain these results.
Notes
Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 2014 Aug;71(8):525-624996680
PubMed ID
24510539 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in a cohort with high fish consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271223
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2014 Dec;25(12):1595-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Anu W Turunen
Anna L Suominen
Hannu Kiviranta
Pia K Verkasalo
Eero Pukkala
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2014 Dec;25(12):1595-602
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Diet
Fatty Acids, Omega-3
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Incidence
Lip Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Population Groups
Registries
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Evidence suggests that fish-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibit cancer promotion and progression. On the other hand, fish may contain endocrine-disrupting and potentially carcinogenic environmental contaminants. Our objective was to describe cancer incidence among the Finnish professional fishermen and their wives who are presumed to eat a lot of fish, partly from the contaminated Baltic Sea. Additionally, we wanted to see whether occupational characteristics are reflected in the fishermen's cancer pattern.
All Finnish fishermen during 1980-2002 were identified from the Professional Fishermen Register (n = 6,410) and their wives from the National Population Information System (n = 4,260). The cohort was linked with the Finnish Cancer Registry data until 2011, and the standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated based on national incidence rates.
The total cancer incidence among the fishermen and their wives was the same as in the Finnish general population. Among the fishermen, the incidence was increased for lip (SIR 2.17, 95 % confidence interval 1.26-3.47) and testis (2.51, 1.15-4.75) and decreased for colon (0.72, 0.52-0.98) cancers.
We cannot exclude the possibility that the observed excess in testis cancer among the fishermen could reflect life-long high exposure to environmental contaminants. An excess in lip cancer has been repeatedly observed among outdoor workers due to high exposure to ultraviolet radiation, whereas high physical activity during fishing is the most likely explanation for the deficit in colon cancer.
PubMed ID
25209112 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence of persons with Down syndrome in Finland: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172392
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Apr 1;118(7):1769-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2006
Author
Kristiina Patja
Eero Pukkala
Reijo Sund
Matti Iivanainen
Markus Kaski
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. kristiina.patja@ktl.fi
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Apr 1;118(7):1769-72
Date
Apr-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Down Syndrome - complications
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have a predisposition to leukaemia and testicular cancer, but data on the incidence of cancers are yet sparse. A cohort of 3,581 persons with DS was identified from a National Registry of Finnish persons with intellectual disability collected between 1978 and 1986 and followed-up for cancer incidence until 2002. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) were defined as ratios of observed number of cancer cases to those expected from the national cancer incidence rates, by age and sex. The overall cancer risk was equal to that of the general population, but a significantly high risk of leukaemia (SIR 10.5, CI 95% 6.6-15.8) and testicular cancer (SIR4.8, CI 95% 1.8-10.4) was found.
PubMed ID
16231334 View in PubMed
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Cannabis Use and Incidence of Testicular Cancer: A 42-Year Follow-up of Swedish Men between 1970 and 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292471
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 Nov; 26(11):1644-1652
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Russell C Callaghan
Peter Allebeck
Olof Akre
Katherine A McGlynn
Anna Sidorchuk
Author Affiliation
Northern Medical Program, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada. russ.callaghan@unbc.ca.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 Nov; 26(11):1644-1652
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Cannabis - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Marijuana Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Background: Given current drug policy reforms to decriminalize or legalize cannabis in numerous countries worldwide, the current study assesses the relation between cannabis use and the development of testicular cancer.Methods: The study included a population-based sample (n = 49,343) of young men ages 18-21 years who underwent conscription assessment for Swedish military service in 1969-1970. The conscription process included a nonanonymous questionnaire eliciting information about drug use. Conscription information was linked to Swedish health and administrative registry data. Testicular cancers diagnosed between 1970 and 2011 were identified by International Classification of Diseases-7/8/9/10 testicular cancer codes in the Swedish National Patient Register, the Cancer Register, or the Cause of Death Register. Cox regression modeling was used to estimate the hazards associated with cannabis use and time to diagnosis of testicular cancer.Results: No evidence was found of a significant relation between lifetime "ever" cannabis use and the subsequent development of testicular cancer [n = 45,250; 119 testicular cancer cases; adjusted HR (aHR), 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.83-2.45]. "Heavy" cannabis use (defined as usage of more than 50 times in lifetime, as measured at conscription) was associated with the incidence of testicular cancer (n = 45,250; 119 testicular cancer cases; aHR 2.57; 95% CI, 1.02-6.50).Conclusions: The current study provides additional evidence to the limited prior literature suggesting cannabis use may contribute to the development of testicular cancer.Impact: Emerging changes to cannabis drug policy should consider the potential role of cannabis use in the development of testicular cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(11); 1644-52. ©2017 AACR.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29093004 View in PubMed
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Cigarette smoking and testicular cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181831
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004 Jan;13(1):49-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Anil Srivastava
Nancy Kreiger
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Research Unit Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2004 Jan;13(1):49-54
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Educational Status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between testicular cancer and cigarette smoking. Data were collected between 1995 and 1996 in Ontario, Canada, as part of the Enhanced Cancer Surveillance Study. Pack-years and years of smoking were examined among all subjects (212 cases and 252 controls) and former and current smokers. Years since quitting and age at smoking initiation were examined among former and current smokers only. Independent of smoking status, significant associations were noted among those who smoked between 12 and 24 pack-years [odds ratio (OR) = 1.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-3.69), relative to nonsmokers] or greater [>24 pack-years, OR = 2.31 (95% CI: 1.12-4.77), relative to nonsmokers], and among those who smoked >21 years [OR = 3.18 (95% CI: 1.32-7.64), relative to nonsmokers]. Quitting smoking was not found to result in a reduction of risk. No association was observed for smoking at adolescence relative to a later period. Results from the study suggest that cigarette smoking exerts an adverse influence on testicular cancer risk that is not mitigated by smoking cessation and not altered by age at initiation.
PubMed ID
14744732 View in PubMed
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Clues to the aetiology of testicular germ cell tumours from descriptive epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24197
Source
Eur Urol. 1993;23(1):8-13; discussion 14-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
H. Møller
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
Eur Urol. 1993;23(1):8-13; discussion 14-5
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Dysgerminoma - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The descriptive epidemiology of testicular cancer in Denmark shows that the incidence of both seminoma and non-seminoma has increased gradually since the 1940s to the present. The age-incidence pattern has remained unchanged, and is the same in the Nordic countries despite variation in the overall incidence level. Men born during the early 1940s have a lower risk in all age groups than expected from the overall trend in incidence. These observations support the idea that the occurrence of testicular cancer (both seminoma and non-seminoma) is determined early in life, and most probably before birth. Once the carcinogenic process is established, the age of occurrence of cancer or the histological type of the cancer does not seem to depend upon external factors.
PubMed ID
8386660 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.