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The 5th Nordic Congress on care of the terminally ill held in Reykjavík 5-7 June 1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203037
Source
Acta Oncol. 1998;37(7-8):741-2
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
1998
Author
V. Sigurdardóttir
Author Affiliation
The Icelandic Cancer Society, Reykjavík. valgerdur@krabb.is
Source
Acta Oncol. 1998;37(7-8):741-2
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Humans
Iceland
Palliative Care
Terminally ill
PubMed ID
10050996 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advanced cancer patients' self-assessed physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from hospital general wards--a questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125804
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2012 Sep;21(5):667-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
L. Soelver
B. Oestergaard
S. Rydahl-Hansen
L. Wagner
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery K, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjeg Bakke 23, Copenhagen, Denmark. lsoe0012@bbh.regionh.dk
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2012 Sep;21(5):667-76
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Diarrhea - etiology - therapy
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, General - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - psychology - therapy
Pain - etiology
Pain Management - standards
Palliative Care - standards
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - etiology - therapy
Terminally ill
Abstract
Most cancer patients receiving life-prolonging or palliative treatment are offered non-specialist palliative services. There is a lack of knowledge about their problem profile. The aim of this article is to describe the incidence of patient-reported physical and emotional problems on admission and discharge from general hospital wards and health staff's reported intervention. A prospective study was undertaken over 12 months, where advanced cancer patients completed a patient questionnaire, EORTC QLQ C15-PAL, on admission (n= 97) and discharge (n= 46). The incidences of the problems were dichotomised in intensity categories. The average number of 'clinically relevant problems' on admission was 5 (SD 2) and on discharge 4 (SD 2). A Wilcoxon signed rank test showed significant change in mean score for six out of nine problem areas, but the majority of the patients did not move to the lower intensity category. The highest concurrence was between patient-reported problems and reported intervention for physical function, pain, constipation and loss of appetite. Palliative cancer patients' self-reported problem profile on admission and discharge from hospital has not previously been described and the results indicate a need to focus on improvements to palliative services and for a special service for pain and constipation that could prevent some admissions.
PubMed ID
22452383 View in PubMed
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Advanced home care for cancer patients at the end of life: a qualitative study of hopes and expectations of family caregivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18927
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2002 Sep;16(3):240-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Agneta Wennman-Larsen
Carol Tishelman
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. agneta.wennman-larsen@omv.ki.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2002 Sep;16(3):240-7
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - psychology
Evaluation Studies
Home Care Services
Hospice Care
Humans
Palliative Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Terminally ill
Abstract
It is increasingly common that cancer patients are cared for at home at the end of life, with help from advanced home care teams. This may have positive implications for cancer patients and their families, but it may also be burdensome to the family caregivers with implications for their health and well-being. This qualitative study was therefore initiated to prospectively explore how family caregivers reason about their expectations of providing end-of-life care at home for relatives with cancer, enrolled in advanced palliative home care units. Ten interviews were conducted with 11 family caregivers at enrollment to the home care unit. A form of constant comparative analysis was used to generate two main themes from the data. One theme concerned the role transition into becoming a family caregiver, whereas the other theme relates to the transition to a new life situation of the caregiver (him/herself). The family caregivers describe themselves as the persons primarily bearing responsibility and providing care for their dying relatives. They were found to have many concerns about their own situation, especially in regard to issues temporally after the death of the patient, but seemed to have few expected sources of support related to these concerns. Professional support is described as expected primarily for care-related tasks, although hopes may be expressed about support in other areas. The distinction between resources described as existing in theory and those used in practice also are apparent in analysis of the interviews. If home care is to be a positive alternative to hospital care, individual expectations should be considered when planning supportive care.
PubMed ID
12191035 View in PubMed
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Age and closeness of death as determinants of health and social care utilization: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152068
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2009 Jun;19(3):313-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Leena Forma
Pekka Rissanen
Mari Aaltonen
Jani Raitanen
Marja Jylhä
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland. leena.forma@uta.fi
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2009 Jun;19(3):313-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Finland
Health Services - utilization
Home Care Services - utilization
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Long-Term Care - utilization
Male
Sex Factors
Social Work - statistics & numerical data
Terminal Care - utilization
Terminally Ill - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
We used case-control design to compare utilization of health and social services between older decedents and survivors, and to identify the respective impact of age and closeness of death on the utilization of services.
Data were derived from multiple national registers. The sample consisted of 56,001 persons, who died during years 1998-2000 at the age of > or = 70, and their pairs matched on age, gender and municipality of residence, who were alive at least 2 years after their counterpart's death. Data include use of hospitals, long-term care and home care. Decedents' utilization within 2 years before death and survivors' utilization in the same period of time was assessed in three age groups (70-79, 80-89 and > or = 90 years) and by gender.
Decedents used hospital and long-term care more than their surviving counterparts, but the time patterns were different. In hospital care the differences between decedents and survivors rose in the last months of the study period, whereas in long-term care there were clear differences during the whole 2-year period. The differences were smaller in the oldest age group than in younger age groups.
Closeness of death is an important predictor of health and social service use in old age, but its influence varies between age groups. Not only the changing age structure, but also the higher average age at death affects the future need for services.
PubMed ID
19286838 View in PubMed
Less detail

An effect of communication on medical decision making: answerability, and the medically induced death of Paul Mills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162604
Source
Health Commun. 2007;22(1):69-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
R Wade Kenny
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Relations, Mount Saint Vincent University. doctorwadekenny@hotmail.com
Source
Health Commun. 2007;22(1):69-78
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Communication
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Male
Palliative Care - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Physicians
Suicide, Assisted - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Terminally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
In this essay, the occasion of a medically induced death is examined to illustrate how circumstances surrounding a medically induced death are interpreted through a theory of how social agents, on occasion, respond inappropriately. The essay illustrates and assesses an occasion when a health professional, faced with a medical crisis that was laden with professional, ethical, and even legal considerations, responded in a manner that overlooked all those standards when she injected potassium chloride into her patient, Paul Mills. In the essay, the case is chronicled and the character of the social and communicative mechanism that led to the disaster is given and used to interpret the events.
PubMed ID
17617015 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An ethically credible intensive care shields the terminally ill patient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185454
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Apr 10;100(15):1358-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2003
Author
Dag Lundberg
Keld Brodersen
Göran Hermerén
Andreas Hvarfner
Tore Nilstun
Eva Ranklev-Twetman
Bertil Romner
Bengt Roth
Author Affiliation
Anestesi- och intensivvårdskliniken, Universitetssjukhuset i Lund. dag.lundberg@anest.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Apr 10;100(15):1358-9
Date
Apr-10-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Intensive Care - ethics
Physician's Role
Sweden
Terminally ill
Tissue Donors - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Tissue and Organ Procurement - ethics
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Apr 24;100(17):155412756704
PubMed ID
12739408 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anxiety is contagious-symptoms of anxiety in the terminally ill child affect long-term psychological well-being in bereaved parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98147
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2010 May;54(5):751-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Li Jalmsell
Ulrika Kreicbergs
Erik Onelöv
Gunnar Steineck
Jan-Inge Henter
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2010 May;54(5):751-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Bereavement
Child
Child, Preschool
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms - psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Quality of Life
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminally Ill - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We studied the relation between unrelieved symptoms in terminally ill children and the psychological well-being in the bereaved parents 4-9 years after their loss. PROCEDURE: We contacted parents in Sweden who had lost a child to a malignancy 1992-1997. The parents were asked to assess symptoms affecting their child's well-being during his or her last month of life, and their own current psychological well-being. RESULTS: Altogether 449/561 (80%) eligible parents supplied information on 19 specific symptoms that may occur in children with a malignancy and how each of these symptoms had affected their child's well-being during his or her last month of life (not applicable, none, low, moderate, or severe). These results were linked to questions concerning the parents' self-assessed mental health. Parents of children who were affected by disturbed sleep also had increased risk to develop these symptoms; RR 2.0 [1.4-2.9] for depression, 1.8 [1.3-2.5] for anxiety, 1.5 [1.2-1.8] for decreased psychological well-being, and 1.5 [1.3-1.9] for decreased quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Bereaved parents whose children were affected by anxiety or disturbed sleep due to anxiety or pain had an increased risk of long-term psychological morbidity. Reducing psychological complications in seriously ill children may also improve the psychological well-being in bereaved parents.
PubMed ID
20135696 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are existential questions the norm for terminally ill patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185943
Source
J Palliat Med. 2002 Dec;5(6):815-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002

Assessing the suitability of host communities for secondary palliative care hubs: a location analysis model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152185
Source
Health Place. 2009 Sep;15(3):792-800
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Jonathan Cinnamon
Nadine Schuurman
Valorie A Crooks
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada V5A 1S6. jca80@sfu.ca
Source
Health Place. 2009 Sep;15(3):792-800
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Geographic Information Systems
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Palliative Care
Professional Practice Location
Rural Population
Terminally ill
Abstract
An increased need for palliative care has been acknowledged world-wide. However, recent Canadian end-of-life care frameworks have largely failed to consider the unique challenges of delivery in rural and remote regions. In the Canadian province of British Columbia (BC), urban areas are well-served for specialized palliative care; however, rural and remote regions are not. This study presents a location analysis model designed to determine appropriate locations to allocate palliative care services. Secondary palliative care hubs (PCH) are introduced as an option for delivering these services in rural and remote regions. Results suggest that several BC communities may be appropriate locations for secondary PCHs. This model could be applied to the allocation of palliative care resources in other jurisdictions with similar rural and remote regions.
PubMed ID
19269241 View in PubMed
Less detail

233 records – page 1 of 24.