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Caring for patients in the end-of-life from the perspective of undergraduate nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311597
Source
Nurs Forum. 2020 Jul; 55(3):433-438
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2020
Author
Anna Abelsson
Anna Willman
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Nurs Forum. 2020 Jul; 55(3):433-438
Date
Jul-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Empathy
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Qualitative Research
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology - standards
Abstract
Caring for patients in the end-of-life is an emotionally and physically challenging task. Therefore, undergraduate nursing students (UNS) need opportunities to learn to care for the dying patient. This study aimed to describe UNS' experiences of caring for patients at end-of-life.
Interviews with 16 UNS in their last semester of nursing education were conducted. Data were analyzed with a phenomenological approach.
The UNS created a professional relationship with the dying patient. It meant that when the patient was unable to speak for themselves, the UNS could still meet his/her wishes and needs. The UNS believed they could take responsibility for the patient who was no longer able to take responsibility for themselves. Meeting with the patient's family could be experienced with anxiousness but was dependent on the personal chemistry between the patient's family and the UNS.
The UNS creates a relationship with the patient and their family. To be knowledgeable about the patient's physical and psychosocial needs means that the UNS can support the patient in the end-of-life phase. Being close to the patient and the family results in an intensity of emotions in the care situation. The UNS can receive support from their colleagues during processing their emotions and creating an experience from their encounters with patients in end-of-life care.
PubMed ID
32173881 View in PubMed
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[From theory to reality in the palliative landscape?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175677
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Mar 17;125(6):760-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-17-2005
Author
Stig Ottesen
Inger Fossli
Trude Aamotsmo
Reidun Holten
Author Affiliation
Kompetansesenter for lindrende behandling, Onkologisk avdeling, Ullevål universitetssykehus, 0407 Oslo. stig.ottesen@uus.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Mar 17;125(6):760-2
Date
Mar-17-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Palliative Care - methods - psychology - standards
Terminal Care - methods - psychology - standards
PubMed ID
15776073 View in PubMed
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A good death from the perspective of palliative cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286321
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2017 Mar;25(3):933-939
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Lisa Kastbom
Anna Milberg
Marit Karlsson
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2017 Mar;25(3):933-939
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Death
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Palliative Care - methods - psychology - standards
Patient Preference - psychology
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology - standards
Terminally Ill - psychology
Abstract
Although previous research has indicated some recurrent themes and similarities between what patients from different cultures regard as a good death, the concept is complex and there is lack of studies from the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to explore the perception of a good death in dying cancer patients in Sweden.
Interviews were conducted with 66 adult patients with cancer in the palliative phase who were recruited from home care and hospital care. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.
Participants viewed death as a process. A good death was associated with living with the prospect of imminent death, preparing for death and dying comfortably, e.g., dying quickly, with independence, with minimised suffering and with social relations intact. Some were comforted by their belief that death is predetermined. Others felt uneasy as they considered death an end to existence. Past experiences of the death of others influenced participants' views of a good death.
Healthcare staff caring for palliative patients should consider asking them to describe what they consider a good death in order to identify goals for care. Exploring patients' personal experience of death and dying can help address their fears as death approaches.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27837324 View in PubMed
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Medical practice, procedure manuals and the standardisation of hospital death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152526
Source
Nurs Inq. 2009 Mar;16(1):22-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Hans Hadders
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Anthropology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dragvoll, Trondheim, Norway. hans.hadders@svt.ntnu.no
Source
Nurs Inq. 2009 Mar;16(1):22-32
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Baths - nursing
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospitals, University - organization & administration
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration
Manuals as Topic
Norway
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Policy
Patient Advocacy
Patient Identification Systems
Philosophy, Nursing
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Terminal Care - methods - psychology - standards
Abstract
This paper examines how death is managed in a larger regional hospital within the Norwegian health-care. The central focus of my paper concerns variations in how healthcare personnel enact death and handle the dead patient. Over several decades, modern standardised hospital death has come under critique in the western world. Such critique has resulted in changes in the standardisation of hospital deaths within Norwegian health-care. In the wake of the hospice movement and with greater focus on palliative care, doors have gradually been opened and relatives of the deceased are now more often invited to participate. I explore how the medical practice around death along with the procedure manual of post-mortem care at Trondheim University Hospital has changed. I argue that in the late-modern context, standardisation of hospital death is a multidimensional affair, embedded in a far more comprehensive framework than the depersonalized medico-legal. In the late-modern Norwegian hospital, interdisciplinary negotiation and co-operation has allowed a number of different agendas to co-exist, without any ensuing loss of the medical power holder's authority to broker death. I follow Mol's notion of praxiographic orientation of the actor-network approach while exploring this medical practice.
PubMed ID
19228301 View in PubMed
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Patient-Nurse Communication about Prognosis and End-of-Life Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275269
Source
J Palliat Med. 2015 Oct;18(10):865-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Lisa Hjelmfors
Martje H L van der Wal
Maria J Friedrichsen
Jan Mårtensson
Anna Strömberg
Tiny Jaarsma
Source
J Palliat Med. 2015 Oct;18(10):865-71
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Comorbidity
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Health Care Surveys
Heart Failure - nursing
Humans
Male
Netherlands
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - standards - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education as Topic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology - standards
Abstract
Although several studies advise that discussions about prognosis and end-of-life care should be held throughout the whole heart failure (HF) trajectory, data is lacking on the prevalence and practice of such discussions in HF care.
The study objective was to explore how often and why HF nurses in outpatient clinics discuss prognosis and end-of-life care in the context of patient education.
This was a descriptive and comparative study. Participants were HF nurses from Swedish and Dutch HF outpatient clinics. Measurements were taken via a survey for both quantitative and qualitative data. Additional data was collected via open-ended questions and analyzed with content analysis.
Two hundred seventy-nine nurses registered 1809 patient conversations using a checklist. Prognosis and end-of-life care were among the least frequently discussed topics, whereas symptoms of HF was discussed most often. Prognosis was discussed with 687 patients (38%), and end-of-life care was discussed with 179 patients (10%). Prognosis and end-of-life care were discussed more frequently in The Netherlands than in Sweden (41% versus 34%, p
PubMed ID
26068058 View in PubMed
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