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33 records – page 1 of 4.

[A trying situation in which routines give confidence].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226202
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jun 5;88(23):2162
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1991
Author
L. Hjelmérus
Author Affiliation
Ersta hemsjukvård, Ersta sjukhus, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jun 5;88(23):2162
Date
Jun-5-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family - psychology
Home Care Services
Humans
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology
PubMed ID
1824413 View in PubMed
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Bridging obstacles to transcultural caring relationships--tools discovered through interviews with staff in pediatric oncology care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86530
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2008 Feb;12(1):35-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Pergert Pernilla
Ekblad Solvig
Enskär Karin
Björk Olle
Author Affiliation
Department of Woman and Child Health, Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital/Solna Q6:05, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. pernilla.pergert@ki.se
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2008 Feb;12(1):35-43
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Child
Communication Barriers
Cultural Competency
Cultural Diversity
Emigration and Immigration
Empathy
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Neoplasms - ethnology - nursing
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology
Oncologic Nursing - education - methods
Pediatric Nursing - education - methods
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology
Transcultural Nursing - education - methods
Abstract
In this qualitative study we explored how health-care staff continuously resolve "obstacles to transcultural caring relationships" as they care for families with an immigrant background within the context of pediatric oncology care. A constant comparative method was used and data collection included 5 focus group interviews and 5 complementary individual interviews with health-care staff within pediatric oncology care. Bridging emerged as the way that health-care staff deal with obstacles to transcultural caring relationships. Bridging is a process in which various tools may be used and combined, including communicational tools, transcultural tools and organizational tools. Failure to use tools, or to use and combine them insufficiently, can bring the caring relationship to a halt, which leads to inequity in care. In order to ensure the provision of high-quality care despite differences in religion, culture, language and social situation, health-care staff need to bridge obstacles to transcultural caring relationships.
PubMed ID
18218338 View in PubMed
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Cancer patients who prefer to die at home. Characterizations of municipalities with several or few occurrences of home deaths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20638
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1999;13(2):102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
L W Sørbye
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Diakonhjemmets College, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1999;13(2):102-8
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Death
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Neoplasms - mortality - nursing - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient satisfaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Terminal Care - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This article presents a descriptive study based on quantitative and qualitative methods. We wished to determine factors that promote or restrict home deaths. The Norwegian Central Bureau of Statistics released non-identifiable data for the time period 1990-1994 for all municipalities in Norway. Relevant health and social data from the Norwegian Social Science Data Service for the 24 municipalities, which had more than 20% or less than 10% of the cancer patients dying in their own homes, were analysed. Key persons in the home care teams were interviewed. There were few occurrences of home deaths in municipalities with a local hospital, good capacity in nursing homes or a larger percentage of one-person households. Indicators for several occurrences of home deaths were openness, good co-operation with physicians, and a stable, flexible staff. In addition, the patient had to have a strong desire to die at home. Finally, the employees had to be professionally confident and willing to go beyond the prescribed shift hours.
PubMed ID
10633740 View in PubMed
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Caring for critically ill patients with advanced COPD at the end of life: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158517
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2008 Jun;24(3):162-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Donna Goodridge
Wendy Duggleby
John Gjevre
Donna Rennie
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7T5E5, Canada. donna.goodridge@usask.ca
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2008 Jun;24(3):162-70
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anxiety - prevention & control
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Critical Care - methods - psychology
Dyspnea - prevention & control
Empathy
Fear
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Medical Futility
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Patient Advocacy
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - nursing - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Respiratory Therapy - methods - psychology
Terminal Care - methods - psychology
Abstract
Providing expert critical care for the high acuity patient with a diagnosis of COPD at the end of life is both complex and challenging. The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians' perspectives on the obstacles to providing quality care for individuals with COPD who die within the critical care environment. Transcripts of three focus groups of ICU clinicians were analyzed using thematic analysis. The three themes of "managing difficult symptoms", "questioning the appropriateness of life-sustaining care" and "conflicting care priorities" were noted to be significant challenges in providing high quality end of life care to this population. Difficulties in palliating dyspnea and anxiety were associated with caregiver feelings of helplessness, empathy and fears about "killing the patient". A sense of futility, concerns about "torturing the patient" and questions about the patient/family's understanding of treatment pervaded much of the discourse about caring for people with advanced COPD in the ICU. The need to prioritize care to the most unstable ICU patients meant that patients with COPD did not always receive the attention clinicians felt they should ideally have. Organizational support must be made available for critical care clinicians to effectively deal with these issues.
PubMed ID
18313923 View in PubMed
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Caring for patients in the end-of-life from the perspective of undergraduate nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311597
Source
Nurs Forum. 2020 Jul; 55(3):433-438
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2020
Author
Anna Abelsson
Anna Willman
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Nurs Forum. 2020 Jul; 55(3):433-438
Date
Jul-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Empathy
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Qualitative Research
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology - standards
Abstract
Caring for patients in the end-of-life is an emotionally and physically challenging task. Therefore, undergraduate nursing students (UNS) need opportunities to learn to care for the dying patient. This study aimed to describe UNS' experiences of caring for patients at end-of-life.
Interviews with 16 UNS in their last semester of nursing education were conducted. Data were analyzed with a phenomenological approach.
The UNS created a professional relationship with the dying patient. It meant that when the patient was unable to speak for themselves, the UNS could still meet his/her wishes and needs. The UNS believed they could take responsibility for the patient who was no longer able to take responsibility for themselves. Meeting with the patient's family could be experienced with anxiousness but was dependent on the personal chemistry between the patient's family and the UNS.
The UNS creates a relationship with the patient and their family. To be knowledgeable about the patient's physical and psychosocial needs means that the UNS can support the patient in the end-of-life phase. Being close to the patient and the family results in an intensity of emotions in the care situation. The UNS can receive support from their colleagues during processing their emotions and creating an experience from their encounters with patients in end-of-life care.
PubMed ID
32173881 View in PubMed
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Consolation in conjunction with incurable cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89725
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2009 Mar;36(2):E99-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Langegard Ulrica
Ahlberg Karin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and the Institute of Health and Care Sciences at Sahlgrenska Academy at Goteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden. ulrica.langegard@gu.se
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2009 Mar;36(2):E99-106
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Communication
Empathy
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Kinesics
Male
Medical Futility - psychology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Oncologic Nursing - methods
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology
Abstract
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To increase knowledge of what patients with incurable cancer have found consoling during the course of the disease. DESIGN: Descriptive, cross-sectional analysis. SETTING: Hospice in western Sweden. SAMPLE: 10 patients (8 women, 2 men) aged 30-90 years. METHODS: Data were collected through semistructured interviews and analyzed with the constant comparative method of analysis. FINDINGS: Four categories emerged from the interview data: connection, self-control, affirmation, and acceptance. The core variable of the study was developed and defined as "being seen." To be seen and, therefore, consoled results from experiencing a sense of connection, self-control, affirmation, and acceptance. To be consoled is a step toward increased well-being. When patients feel their suffering is seen and understood by another person, they are filled with relief. CONCLUSIONS: Raising the issue of consolation and what consolation means to the patient is essential. Physical contact is not as important as mental presence. The act of listening is the most important factor when it comes to being seen, and what the nurse communicates is what defines the patient/nurse relationship. Nurses should be clear that they have the time and interest to deal with the patient. In addition, a nurse who is concerned with patients and has the courage to stay with them during difficult situations develops an attitude marked by presence, understanding, and commitment. Creativity, knowledge, and, most of all, courage are needed from the nurse as a caregiver to recognize the patient's need for consolation. Creativity and knowledge are needed to determine what point the patient has reached, and courage is needed to be present with the patient during difficult times. Results show that the caregiver, without having an established long-term relationship with the patient, can still bring consolation to the patient. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Creativity, knowledge, and courage are needed to comprehend and accept a patient's need for consolation. By using simple interventions, the nurse can console the patient with little effort. Words become less important when consolation is done through body language.
PubMed ID
19273399 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jun 5;88(23):2161-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1991
Author
B. Persson
Author Affiliation
Distriktssköterska, Kyrkhult.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jun 5;88(23):2161-2
Date
Jun-5-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family - psychology
Home Care Services
Humans
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology
PubMed ID
1824412 View in PubMed
Less detail

Defining priorities for improving end-of-life care in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140279
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 9;182(16):E747-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-9-2010
Author
Daren K Heyland
Deborah J Cook
Graeme M Rocker
Peter M Dodek
Demetrios J Kutsogiannis
Yoanna Skrobik
Xuran Jiang
Andrew G Day
S Robin Cohen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ont. dkh2@queensu.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Nov 9;182(16):E747-52
Date
Nov-9-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Death
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hospice Care - methods
Humans
Male
Palliative Care - methods - psychology
Patient Preference
Patient satisfaction
Professional-Family Relations
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Terminal Care - methods - psychology
Terminally Ill - psychology
Total Quality Management
Abstract
High-quality end-of-life care should be the right of every Canadian. The objective of this study was to identify aspects of end-of-life care that are high in priority as targets for improvement using feedback elicited from patients and their families.
We conducted a multicentre, cross-sectional survey involving patients with advanced, life-limiting illnesses and their family caregivers. We administered the Canadian Health Care Evaluation Project (CANHELP) questionnaire along with a global rating question to measure satisfaction with end-of-life care. We derived the relative importance of individual questions on the CANHELP questionnaire from their association with a global rating of satisfaction, as determined using Pearson correlation coefficients. To determine high-priority issues, we identified questions that had scores indicating high importance and low satisfaction.
We approached 471 patients and 255 family members, of whom 363 patients and 193 family members participated, with response rates of 77% for patients and 76% for families. From the perspective of patients, high-priority areas needing improvement were related to feelings of peace, to assessment and treatment of emotional problems, to physician availability and to satisfaction that the physician took a personal interest in them, communicated clearly and consistently, and listened. From the perspective of family members, similar areas were identified as high in priority, along with the additional areas of timely information about the patient's condition and discussions with the doctor about final location of care and use of end-of-life technology.
End-of-life care in Canada may be improved for patients and their families by providing better psychological and spiritual support, better planning of care and enhanced relationships with physicians, especially in aspects related to communication and decision-making.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20921249 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dignity-conserving care actions in palliative care: an integrative review of Swedish research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295083
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Mar; 32(1):8-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Carina Werkander Harstäde
Karin Blomberg
Eva Benzein
Ulrika Östlund
Author Affiliation
Centre for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Mar; 32(1):8-23
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Palliative Care - methods - psychology
Personhood
Right to Die
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods - psychology
Abstract
Previous research has proposed that persons in need of palliative care often have a loss of functions and roles that affects social and existential self-image. Moreover, these individuals also commonly suffer from complex multisymptoms. This, together with the situation of facing an impending death, can lead to a loss of dignity. Therefore, supporting these persons' dignity is a crucial challenge for professional nurses. The 'Dignity Care Intervention' addresses the multidimensionality of dignity by identifying patients' dignity-related concerns and suggests care actions to address them. At the present, the Dignity Care Intervention is adapted for implementation in Swedish care settings. Because expressions of dignity are influenced by culture, and an overview of care actions in a Swedish context is lacking, this integrative review aimed to find suggestions from Swedish research literature on what kind of care actions can preserve dignity.
An integrative literature review was conducted using the databases SwePub and SweMed+. Articles published from 2006 to 2015 and theses published from 2000 to 2015 were searched for using the terms 'dignity' and 'palliative care'. Result sections of articles and theses were reviewed for dignity-conserving care actions synthesised by thematic analysis and categorised under themes and subthemes in Chochinov's model of dignity.
Fifteen articles and 18 theses were included together providing suggestions of care actions in all themes and subthemes in the dignity model. Suggested care actions included listening, communication, information, symptom control, facilitating daily living and including patients in decision-making. Additionally, nurses' perceptiveness towards the patients was a core approach.
The review offers culturally relevant suggestions on how to address specific dignity-related concerns. The adapted Dignity Care Intervention will be a way for Swedish nurses to provide person-centred palliative care that will conserve patients' dignity.
PubMed ID
28509335 View in PubMed
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Doctors' learning experiences in end-of-life care - a focus group study from nursing homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281299
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2017 Jan 31;17(1):27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2017
Author
Anette Fosse
Sabine Ruths
Kirsti Malterud
Margrethe Aase Schaufel
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2017 Jan 31;17(1):27
Date
Jan-31-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Death
Education, Medical, Graduate - methods - organization & administration
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Internship and Residency - methods - organization & administration
Male
Norway
Nursing Homes - manpower - organization & administration
Palliative Care - methods - psychology
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians - psychology
Problem-Based Learning - methods
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Terminal Care - methods - psychology
Abstract
Doctors often find dialogues about death difficult. In Norway, 45% of deaths take place in nursing homes. Newly qualified medical doctors serve as house officers in nursing homes during internship. Little is known about how nursing homes can become useful sites for learning about end-of-life care. The aim of this study was to explore newly qualified doctors' learning experiences with end-of-life care in nursing homes, especially focusing on dialogues about death.
House officers in nursing homes (n?=?16) participated in three focus group interviews. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation. Lave & Wenger's theory about situated learning was used to support interpretations, focusing on how the newly qualified doctors gained knowledge of end-of-life care through participation in the nursing home's community of practice.
Newly qualified doctors explained how nursing home staff's attitudes taught them how calmness and acceptance could be more appropriate than heroic action when death was imminent. Shifting focus from disease treatment to symptom relief was demanding, yet participants comprehended situations where death could even be welcomed. Through challenging dialogues dealing with family members' hope and trust, they learnt how to adjust words and decisions according to family and patient's life story. Interdisciplinary role models helped them balance uncertainty and competence in the intermediate position of being in charge while also needing surveillance.
There is a considerable potential for training doctors in EOL care in nursing homes, which can be developed and integrated in medical education. This practice based learning arena offers newly qualified doctors close interaction with patients, relatives and nurses, teaching them to perform difficult dialogues, individualize medical decisions and balance their professional role in an interdisciplinary setting.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28143600 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.