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52 records – page 1 of 6.

Source
Can Nurse. 2006 Feb;102(2):26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Ann Tapp
Author Affiliation
Canadian Nurses Protective Society, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can Nurse. 2006 Feb;102(2):26
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Humans
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Proxy - legislation & jurisprudence
Terminal Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2006 May;102(5):8-916789559
PubMed ID
16524045 View in PubMed
Less detail

The beneficial role of a judicial process when "everything" is too much?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155004
Source
Healthc Q. 2008;11(4):46-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Mark Handelman
Bob Parke
Author Affiliation
Ontario Consent and Capacity Board, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Healthc Q. 2008;11(4):46-50
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Decision Making
Humans
Patient Participation
Terminal Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Third-Party Consent
Abstract
This narrative is written with the intent to encourage physicians as well as other healthcare professionals to use judicial processes, such as those provided by the Ontario Consent and Capacity Board, to help resolve conflict with treatment decisions between care providers and decision-makers. Through the presentation of a fictional yet common case scenario, it is argued that after all attempts at mediation have been attempted that the timely use of a third party is in the patient's, the family's and the healthcare team's best interests.
PubMed ID
18818529 View in PubMed
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Bioethics for clinicians: 11. Euthanasia and assisted suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208428
Source
CMAJ. 1997 May 15;156(10):1405-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1997
Author
J V Lavery
B M Dickens
J M Boyle
P A Singer
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1997 May 15;156(10):1405-8
Date
May-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Euthanasia, Active
Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary
Humans
Intention
Internationality
Mental Competency
Personal Autonomy
Physician's Role
Stress, Psychological
Suicide, Assisted - legislation & jurisprudence
Terminal Care - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Wedge Argument
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
Euthanasia and assisted suicide involve taking deliberate action to end or assist in ending the life of another person on compassionate grounds. There is considerable disagreement about the acceptability of these acts and about whether they are ethically distinct from decisions to forgo life-sustaining treatment. Euthanasia and assisted suicide are punishable offences under Canadian criminal law, despite increasing public pressure for a more permissive policy. Some Canadian physicians would be willing to practise euthanasia and assisted suicide if these acts were legal. In practice, physicians must differentiate between respecting competent decisions to forgo treatment, providing appropriate palliative care, and acceeding to a request for euthanasia or assisted suicide. Physicians who believe that euthanasia and assisted suicide should be legally accepted in Canada should pursue their convictions only through legal and democratic means.
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1997 Sep 15;157(6):638, 6409307548
PubMed ID
9164399 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bioethics for clinicians: 15. Quality end-of-life care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204862
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Jul 28;159(2):159-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-28-1998
Author
P A Singer
N. MacDonald
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics, ON. peter.singer@utoronto.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Jul 28;159(2):159-62
Date
Jul-28-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Care Planning
Bioethics
Canada
Clinical Medicine - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia, Active
Humans
Quality of Health Care
Stress, Psychological
Terminal Care - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
A physician who receives a call from the emergency department to see a patient with heart failure will have a clear framework within which to approach this problem. The thesis of this article is that physicians do not have an analogous conceptual framework for approaching end-of-life care. The authors present and describe a framework for end-of-life care with 3 main elements: control of pain and other symptoms, the use of life-sustaining treatments and support of those who are dying and their families. This 3-part framework can be used by clinicians at the bedside to focus their effort in improving the quality of end-of-life care.
Notes
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1993 Jul 15;119(2):121-68099769
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 Mar 3;330(9):592-67508092
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1995 Apr;43(4):440-67706637
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Jul 15;155(2):189-908800077
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Sep 15;155(6):657-618823211
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Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Dec 15;155(12):1689-928976334
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Jan 15;156(2):225-89012726
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 May 15;156(10):1405-89164399
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Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 1997 Dec;14(6):332-429409098
Cites: J Clin Ethics. 1997 Winter;8(4):359-719503086
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Apr 27;158(8):879-849570174
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Jun 30;158(13):1717-269676549
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Jul 15;155(2):177-808800075
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1997 Jan 15;126(2):97-1069005760
PubMed ID
9700330 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian doctors ask court to clarify who has authority in end of life situations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124488
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e3348
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Not for all terminally ill patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215422
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1995 Apr;41:649-52, 655-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
D. Ginn
D. Zitner
Author Affiliation
Health Law Institute, Dalhousie University, Halifax.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1995 Apr;41:649-52, 655-7
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Resuscitation Orders - legislation & jurisprudence
Terminal Care - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
Where there are clear clinical indications that a patient suffering from a terminal illness would not benefit from cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there is no legal or ethical requirement that CPR be discussed with the patient as a treatment option or that CPR be administered if the patient stops breathing or suffers cardiac arrest.
Notes
Cites: Humane Med. 1993 Jan;9(1):57-6311652942
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Sep 8;309(10):569-766877286
Cites: J Leg Med. 1991 Jun;12(2):115-651885937
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Sep 12;264(10):1276-802388379
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1989 Jul-Aug;4(4):349-552668460
PubMed ID
7787495 View in PubMed
Less detail

Care of the dying elderly person: the perspective of a nurse in palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243936
Source
Health Law Can. 1982;3(4):82-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

Cessation of treatment and suicide: a proposal for reform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243946
Source
Health Law Can. 1982;3(4):72-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
J L Baudouin
Source
Health Law Can. 1982;3(4):72-3
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence
Euthanasia, Passive
Humans
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Suicide
Terminal Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The present state of the law in relation to dying persons is in a state of uncertainty primarily because there has not yet been a clear jurisprudential indication of the meaning to be given to a certain number of sections of the Canadian Criminal Code dealing with the subject. I propose to briefly discuss the law as it now exists and to refer to a working paper (No. 28) of the Law Reform Commission of canada called "Euthanasia, Aiding Suicide and Cessation of Treatment".
PubMed ID
10309986 View in PubMed
Less detail

Commentary on Billings and Block's "Slow euthanasia".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213124
Source
J Palliat Care. 1996;12(4):38-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996

Death duties: workshop on what family physicians are expected to do when patients die.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161297
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Jun;53(6):1035-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Kathryn A Myers
David Eden
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, St Joseph's Health Care Centre, Room A011, 268 Grosvenor St, London ON N6A 4V2. Kathryn.myers@sjhc.london.on.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Jun;53(6):1035-8
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Coroners and Medical Examiners
Curriculum
Death Certificates - legislation & jurisprudence
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Family Practice - education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Needs Assessment
Physician's Role
Program Evaluation
Terminal Care - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Abstract
Family physicians are often called upon to pronounce and certify the deaths of patients. Inadequate knowledge of the Coroners Act (in the province of Ontario) and of the correct process of certifying death can make physicians uncomfortable when confronted with these tasks.
To educate family physicians about how to perform the administrative tasks required of them when patients die.
The program included an educational video, a tutorial outlining the process of death certification, and discussion with a regional coroner about key features of the Coroners Act. In small groups, participants worked through cases of patient deaths in which they were asked to determine whether a coroner needed to be involved, to determine the manner of death, and to complete a mock death certificate for each case.
All participants reported a high level of satisfaction with the workshop and thought the main objective of the program had been achieved. Results of a test given 3 months after the workshop showed substantial improvement in participants' knowledge of the coroner's role and of the process of death certification.
Notes
Cites: Aust J Public Health. 1992 Dec;16(4):431-41296794
Cites: J Public Health Med. 1993 Jun;15(2):192-2018353009
Cites: Clin Invest Med. 1993 Aug;16(4):249-558306533
Cites: Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1993 Sep;14(3):249-528311060
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Mar 13;275(10):794-68598597
Cites: Ulster Med J. 1997 May;66(1):13-79185484
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1989 Nov 9;321(19):1306-112677732
Cites: Aust Fam Physician. 1998 Mar;27(3):178-829529707
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 May 19;158(10):1317-239614825
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1998 Dec 15;129(12):1020-69867756
Cites: Med Educ. 1996 Nov;30(6):434-99217906
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2001 Mar;54(3):232-811223320
Cites: Am J Med. 2004 Oct 1;117(7):492-815464706
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2007 Jun;53(6):977-8, 981-217872761
PubMed ID
17872782 View in PubMed
Less detail

52 records – page 1 of 6.