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[Caring for persons at the end of life in a curative care unit: privileges and heartbreaks].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145841
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2009;19(3):110-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Marie-Laurence Fortin
Louise Bouchard
Author Affiliation
l''Hôpital Général Juif, 3755 chemin de la Côte Ste-Catherine, Montréal, Québec. mfortin@jgh.mcgill.ca
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2009;19(3):110-6
Date
2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Conflict (Psychology)
Empathy
Frustration
Grief
Hospital Units - ethics - organization & administration
Hospitals, University
Humanism
Humans
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations - ethics
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - ethics - organization & administration - psychology
Organizational Culture
Philosophy, Nursing
Professional Autonomy
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Terminal Care - ethics - organization & administration - psychology
Thinking
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe the experience of caring for individuals at the end of life by five nurses working in curative care units. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gain a better understanding of the meaning nurses give to this experience. The analysis of results, based on Giorgi's phenomenological method (1997), highlighted a central meaning: it is a human experience fraught with paradoxes where the bedside nurse feels both privileged to be accompanying these individuals at the end of their lives and torn between the medical priority given to curative care and the lesser priority given to palliative care. This study offers relevant options for nurse managers wanting to improve these nurses' work environment and the quality of care for individuals at the end of life.
PubMed ID
20101940 View in PubMed
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Signs of life and signs of death: brain death and other mixed messages at the end of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157246
Source
J Child Health Care. 2008 Jun;12(2):92-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Mary Ellen Macdonald
Stephen Liben
Franco A Carnevale
S Robin Cohen
Author Affiliation
Insituttes of Health Research New Emerging Team: Family Caregiving in Palliative and End-of-life Care, Montreal, Canada. mary.macdonald@mcgill.ca
Source
J Child Health Care. 2008 Jun;12(2):92-105
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Bereavement
Brain Death - diagnosis - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Child
Communication
Craniocerebral Trauma - diagnosis
Critical Care - psychology
Female
Frustration
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Intensive Care Units, Pediatric
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Terminal Care - ethics - organization & administration - psychology
Time Factors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - ethics - organization & administration
Abstract
Brain death is a medical, legal and cultural category constructed to fill an important need created by evolving medical technologies and practices. However, managing life and death via organ transplants and brain death criteria is not without controversy; there remains much confusion and ambivalence in both lay and medical populations regarding both organ donation and the diagnostic category of brain death. By way of a case study of cranial trauma taken from a larger study of bereaved parents, this article discusses how, from a parent's perspective, brain death and organ donation are neither morally nor medically straightforward concepts. The case study presented in this article demonstrates the necessity for more research and clinical training in communication issues regarding brain death and end-of-life care with families in critical care situations.
PubMed ID
18469294 View in PubMed
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